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Lincoln County tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1885-1890, August 28, 1889, Image 1

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THE TRIBUNE.
STEVENS & BARE, .Prop's.
TERMS:
If paid in Advance, only $ 1.00 per year.
One Year, if not in Advance, $1.50.
Six Months, in Advance, - - - , .75
-Three Months, in Advance, - - .50
Advertising Rates on Application.
t
YOL. Y.
NORTH PLATTE, tfEBR&SKA, AUGUST 28, L889.
NO. 33.
E. B WARNER,
Funeral Director
Keeps constantly in btock Metalic mid Cloth
Draped Caskets, complete line of TrimmingH
in white'and black, Glosa White Caskets,
Coffins of all sizes, Shronds & Shoes.
Telegraph orders promptly attended to.2
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT..
Sixth Stkket, uxors or Locust.
NORTH PLATTE, : : NEBRASKA
PUBLIC NOTICE.
DAYS
FOR THE NEXT 60
WE WILL SELL FOB
SPOT CA.SH
Anything in our store consisting of all new and
well made goods as follows:
Chil-
Mens, Boys
dren's
and
Suits,
THE NEW BABYLON.
Hats, Caps, Boots Shoes, Trunks, Valises,
AST lOTXJAL COST
and remember we mean what we say
and do it. Now is your best time
to get Bargains at the
MODE
Mine
Leaders
EINSTEEN & Co.
of Fashion and Low Prices.
No. 3496.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK,
North. Platte, - N&h.
Authorized Capital, $200,000. Paid in Capital, $50,000.
Banking In All Its Branches Transacted
Sell Bills of Exchange Direct on Great Britain and Ireland, Switzer
land, France, Belgium, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark,
Italy, Russia, Spain, Portugal, German' and Austria.
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS.
CTCTXiD.
$50 REWARD.
Hy virtue of Uio laws of the State of Nebraska,
1 hereby offer a reward of Fifty Dollars for the
capture and conviction of any person charged
with horse stealing in Lincoln county.
D. A. BAKER,
Bhcriff.
R. D. THOMSON,
ixclxitect,
Contractor and Builder.
127 Sixth St. Cor. of Vine,
NOKTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
RICHARDS & Co.,
CONTRACTORS,
We coutract on everything in the
line of building.
I. K. S0MERS,
Nurseryman,
Florist and Gardener,
(BARTON PLACE,)
NORTH PLATTE, NEBR.
Can furnish all kinds of fruit and
shade trees, forest trees, and seed
lings for tree claims at lowest
prices. Also all kinds of plants and
flowers. Estimates and designs
given for laying out new grounds.
Yards kept by contract.
Martin & Nauman
. BUTCHERS,
AND DEALERS IN"
m AID SALT MEATS,
HAMS ,BACON, SAUSAGE
AND FISH.
Highest Price Paid for Fat Stock.
Sixth Street, between 8prnce and Pine,
NORTH PLATTE, - - NEB.
St.
M.
31.
U. P. TIME TABLE.
OOIKO EAST.
No. it Chicago Express DeptSO a.
No. 4 Fast Express " 10:50 a.
No. 2 Atlantic Express " 8.-03 p.
No. 22-Freight " 530 A.
GOING WEST MOUNTAIN TIME.
No. 1 Fast ExDress Dept 6:03 a. m.
No. 3-Pacific Express 0:10 p. M.
No. 5Denver Express " 8:10 p. M.
No. 23-Freight " 7:15 a. m.
J. C Ferguson. Agent.
NESBITT & GRIMES,
Attorneys-at-Law,
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBR.
Office over Foley's 8tobe.
B. I. Hinman.
T. Fulton Gantt.
HINMAN & GANTT,
Attorneys - at -
Will practice in all the courts of tho State.
Office over the Postoffice.
C. M. DUNCAN, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Office: Ottenstein's Block, np 6tairs. Office
hoars from to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 and 7 to 'J p. m
Residence on West Sixth Street.
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBRASKA.
Doctor McNEIL SMITH,
Graduate oi the Royal Colleges of Physicians
and Sargeons, Edinburgh,
FHTSIOIAX.
Office and Kcsidence,
Wellfleet, - Nebraska.
P. WALSH,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates on "Work Furnished.
Shop Corner Cottonwood and Third Sts
east of Catholic church.
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
Notice is hereby given that I will examine all
persons who may desire to offer themselves as
candidates for teachers of the common schools of
this county on the THIRD TUESDAY of every
month.
R. H. LANCFORD,
County Supt.
A. P. CARLSON,
Merchant
Tailor.
Full line o piece goods always on
hand and made to order.
Only first-class workmen employed.
Shop on Spruce Street over Hans Gertler&Co.
must so right
"Give me water, or rather let me be
permitted to store up the waters of
Heaven that are wasted, and I can make
the whole North American desert as fer
tile and as fruitful as were the gardens of
Babvlon in the days of old."
These are the words of one of the ablest
senators : a man who has been more or
less in what was once laid down on our
maps as the "Great American Desert"
since his boyhood, and who has grown
gray in the United States Senate.
Reader. I have engaged with the Iride
pendent, for most generous pay, to lay
down the tools of husbandry here on my
mountain ranch by the great Bay of San
Francisco and make a long journey.
Oreeon. Washington, Montana. Dakota.
Colorado, these are some of the sections
named in the contract, where I am to look
closely at the progress of things and re
port thereon in a brief, plain way, with a
much greater regard for facts than nne
writing. I am especially asked to look
out for fair and safe investment for
Eastern capital; to report on farming,
stock-raising, milling, and most especially
on land investment. You will bear with
me then after this statement if 1 am
sometimes a bit prosy and statistical and
given over to quotations from senators,
governors, and so on, as above. It is not
always best to stand alone in our state
ments or to leave off figures, which they
say never He.
And now to begin: I
oacK to wnere i lett on when this paper
sent me to Mexico three years ago. I
must beg 3'ou to recall my account of the
reservoirs for water there"; the thousand
little artificial lakes that lie on the hot
and glaring mountain sides and down in
the deep valleys as you descend from the
snowy heights of Zacatecas and the silver
mines of Northern Mexico.
Well, those little lakes have been there
I hince time immemorial. The little Aztec.
hollowed them out with his little wash
bowl and small brown hands, just as his
descendants build the beds of railroads to
this day. For you must know that there
has never been a wheel-barrow in all
Mexico. The dirt is all scooped up by
the hand and then' borne on the head in a
little wooden bowl.
But to get on with the subject in hand :
I only wanted to recall the fact that it is
by these little artificial lakes that Mexico
lives.
My last article on this theme was of
a more recent date, and was called "The
North American Nile." This has been
translated into Spanish, and is made a
text for quite a book on agriculture and
irrigation in Mexico. You will please
remember that I attempted to show by
the ruined cities scattered along the banks
of the Colorado and in other parts of
Arizona, that this portion of our Republic
hud once been and could again be, under
American enterprise, all that the Nile has
ever been in power and population.
Bear with me further if I inform you
that it was this same paper which secured
to the "Great American Desert" an ap
propriation of a quarter of a million of
dollars at the last session of Congress for
the survey of that vast region.
And now let me recall the fact that I
advise all who have pluck and ambition
to try and get hold of land in Arizona,
or elsewhere adjacent, where land could
be bo had cheap, and I have done with
looking back or speaking of myself.
The 'contemplated trip will take in
much of this section of country. And
as I firmly believe with the Senator quoted
from at the head of this article, that the
"great desert," as it was once called, can
be made green, why, this must be the
place for investments where tremendous
returns are to be had for a small outlay
But the buyer of lands must now be
careful not to purchase the site of a reser
voir. It is not perhap8Ngenerally known
that Congress, at the last session, reserve d
all lands, in a very general way, that are
suitable or necessary for reservoirs in the
arid regions. We whirl along so fast and
are doing so much that it is doubtful if
one man in ten thousand is at all aware
of this reservation. And indeed, I doubt
if one man in ten thousand among us is
aware that Major Powell, the head of
topographical engineers for the United
States, is at this moment at work survey
mg the region described in the sketch
called -The North American Nile." But
it is a fact ; and it is a fact that a few far-
seeing and very shrewd men are following
his footsteps closely. Let me beg you, if
you caie for the development of our
country, to say nothing of your own
future, to follow his reports closely. It
would be a wise thing if some few shrewd
men could "pool in" and keep one of
their number with Major Powell in Ihe
field. Information thus obtained would
be of incalculable value to iuvestors.
I was asked to be bresent a meeting of
the prominent men west of the Rocky
Mountains in San Francisco not long
since, where this great question was to be
discussed.
President A. T. Hatch stated that Con
gress had alread3r appropriated $350,000
for surveys, and that a committee of six,
of which Senator Stewart was one, would
meet in St Paul on August 1st, and thence
proceed to Nevada and Colorado to deter
mine what future steps would be advis
able. Senator Stanford was called upon
to speak. Said he :
"On the question of the value of irri
gation, there can be no two opinions.
The irrigation belt extends from the Rio
Grande to the British line, and covers an
area of about 1,200 square miles. I was
very much impressed when at San Diego
not long ago to see what they had don e
there. Their reservoir cost but $200,000,
and yet the water stored in it will irrigate
more than 40,000 acres. The people there
have let new light on the subject. I
know of my own knowledge of places in
Nevada where water could be stored to
irrigate millions of acres. At one point
on the Humboldt water could be stored
to irrigate a strip five miles wide and per
haps in all containing not less than
1,000,000 acres.
'There must be an entire revolution of
opinion in the East regarding our lands.
There are large areas where a chipmunk
could not live. Surveys must be made,
and whenever the land is redeemed,
poor men can go and make farms. As
the arid belt is now it is practically
valueless. The arid region of the country
is more than equal to all the country east
of Chicago. The homes that may be
made in it after a wise system of irriga
tiou are impossible to estimate. Billions
of dollars should not stop us at all from
doing whatever is necessary. The State
Board of Trade, and thosi who have been
invited to meet you here, are on the most
important question that has ever been
considered. I would like to seo you
follow it up and get the East out of its old
rectangular ruts."
Here we have the ablest financier in
the United States, a ipan of senatorial
dignity, a man who lately gave twenty
million dollars to the endowment of a
university, telling us tbatc -billions of
dollars1 exp enditure sb ould not deter us
from redeeming the arid lands of Middle
America. Take a map and; .you will see
that his assertion abotrt-,the area being
larger than all that portion of the United
States east of Chicago-, is strictly within
the lines of actual measurement.
It is enough to take one's' breath away,
the magnitude of this proposition! It is
of far more importance to; the world than
was the discovery of gold'ln California.
The opportunities to make great and
sudden fortunes are greater, and surely
they are far more certain.. For who ever
ins money ov
would be from $5 to $10 an acre. Cer
tainly it would not be over one-tenth as
much as to clear land of timber: and there
is another thing about it. An irrigated
acre of land is worth double what an acre
is that has to depend on rainfall. Most
people who have given the matter atten
tion say my estimate is too low, and that
an irrigated acre is worth two or three of
those forced to depend on rainfall
"In
found
Egypt curious things have been
A defile going out of the Nile
digging
has been
heard of any man loseing, li
putting it In land? -u
Therefore 1 sound it out over me union
as sounding a trumpet; 'Get land ! Get
land! Get land! Get land. in the "Great
American Desert," and never let go ono
handful of sand till it has turned to gold .
You ask, Why this sadden action of
Congress and this impeitfous interest out
here in this vast enterprise? .
The answer is easy. India !
If you look at the wheal crop of India
you can read the whole .story. India is
feeding the world witti'bread-. And God
bless her for that; but it has called
America to the front in competition
And America cannot compete till she does
what India has done and is steadily doing.
And it is all enxressed in the question at
the head of this article, in the one word,
irrigation !
When we came out here and conquered
all this Southwest world from Mexico, wo
found they had water over the land, and
in this way obtained tremendous results
with but little labor. But 7d you Know
we despised all that? Why, I 'veu re
member hearing a preaqher preach with
all his might against it. His text "was to
the effect that we shall letjGod send rain
that "He sendeth his rain,? ;ctc:., etc.
Well, when England, overran India,
coming from hermurkv ahd misty Isles,
she could not comprehend4the motive of
pouring the waters on thp &il by canals
any more tnan we, wnen we came oui
here. And so India kept sliding uncK
and sinking down year after; year, with
now and then a dreadful fa mine. At last
she took to irrigation. Let me give a part
of the report from a single district for
last year:
"Any more striking illustration ni wie
social and fiscal value of canals could not
be civen. and its force is p.nfein'i'U so fur
as the state is concerned, by the fact that
the entire cost of the worksViiot including
ordinary repairs and establishment) on
the canals west of the Jumfla, up to the
present time, amounts ony to 119.474,
so that the returns of the year 1887-8 in
land and water rent have covered the
whole expenditure, leaving a surplus of I
nearly 26,800 from thbj'sqnrce alone."
Here we have the whole:th!ng in a nut
shell. Only India has about live year
the start. "But the Yankee is now well
awake, and he may yet overtake the
Englishman.
"Billions of dollars," says Senator Stan
ford, must not deter "us from this
stupendous work.
For my own part, I can only call upon
every member of Congress not to cripple
us by scant appropriations. If "need be
let these "desert lands" be doubled or
quadrupled even in price to pay for
what the English in India call "canals."
Only let us not be far behind.
To the Indiana American let me again
say, Get land ! get land ! get laud ! GVt a
great deal of land if you can, and then cut
it up into colonies, as tunny good men
have done out here in California. I shall
visit some of these fortunate colonies, and
shall see their life blood, the "'canal" next
week, and shall write you down the
details so that you may see J he future
and the power that lies in store for any
man wise enough to get a grod share of
desert land and divide it among his
fellows. I will now close this sketch by
an extract from the speech of Senator
Stewart.'of Nebraska, before the Califor
nia Board of Trade last week.
Said Senator Stewart:
"My plan is to first get the surveys and
then an appropriation each year for all
that we can. Wo are now allowed reser
voir right. We ought to have had them
connects with a great basin, and
into the defile a great dike
discovered. Thousands of conduits made
of masonry have -been found that are
perfect to-day. Remains of hydraulic
works have also been found in South
America that people in after centuries
did not know how to build.
"I did not think irrigation injures
health or produces malaria. I think it is
beneficial if property done. Look at the
island of Ceylon. Look at India. With
their mighty population they can't be very
unhealthy countries. Look also at the
valley of the Nile, where irrigation is the
rule.
"Of course you take any new country,
where you first turn up the soil, and you
will have malaria; but remember that
two-thirds of all our agriculture, but now
and for all time past, has been carried on
by irrigation. Nobody has understood
that agriculture was unhealthy.
"Rainfall bleaches the land too much .
That's what is the matter with a vast area
from Baltimore to the Gulf
"Everybody is astonished over in Nevada
and in Southern California, to s:e what
the sage brush land will produce. It is
stronger laud . It hasn't been bleached.
It is the best kind of land there is. Take
a look at Lombardy, in Italy l:ere they
haveb:cn irrigating for 2,000 years. Take
Spain. In both the richness of the soil
is preserved, and the public hpalth is as
good as it is possible to bp under any con
dition. Edgland now proposes to irrigate
two-thirds of Egypt. The people of the
United States are destined to lead the
j world in irrigation.. .tvijui J filler in
j 1 lie independent.
ew Goods Affp sf friees
AT THE NEW STORE.
RENNIE'S GREAT FALL SALE.
There was a terrible epidemic of
dysentery and blood' tlux in Pope
County, Illinois, last summer. As man)'
as five deaths occurred in yone day.
Mpssrs. Walter Brothers, of Waltersburg,
sold over 380 bottles of Chamberlain's
Cholic, Cholera, and Diarrhoea Remedy
during this epidemic and say the) never
heard of it's failing in auy case when the
directions were followed. It was the
only medicine used that did cure the
worst cases. Many persons were cured
by it after the doctor had given them up.
Twenty live and fifty cent bottles for sale
bv A. F. StreHx airl'Dr. Lnng!cy North
Platte. -S "
NOTICE'
TO CATTLE OWNERS.
Do not turn your cows out until the
herder calls for them. I shall certainly
enforce the ordinance and impound every
animal found running at large in the citv
limits. The Town Lot Go's addition is ih
the eity limits. Thi notice applies to
horse as well :is cows.
Syl Friend,
Chief of Police.
NOTICE TO DELINQUENTS.
twenty years ago. We need irrigation as
far east as the ninety-eighth or ninety
ninth meridian, and from that to the
Pacific Ocean, with a little exception.
Few people know that at least two-thirds
of the agriculture of the globe is by
irrigation .
"It is not really as hard to overcome
the deserts as the forests, but this fact is
entirely new to the people of the East. I
wouldn't make the estimate now of what
it will cost to do the work we want done.
It will take more than 4,000,000, and
probably more than $10,000,000. All that
can be done with the $250,000 appropriat
ted recently is to survey a few initial
points. We will get more appropriations
each year hereafter. Major Powell
thinks Truqkee is a good point to begin
with.
"One thiug we want to do, is to show
this committee what irrigation has done
Another is to show that irrigation does
not cause a monopoly of lands When
we have the surveys and estimates made,
and land still remains untaken, we can
then put the lands on sale in a body if
need be. I believe California is capable
of supporting 40,000,000, and I believe
that eighty or ninety per cent, of our
water is going to waste. Colorado has led
off and done better than any other state."
Senator Stewart then turned his atten
tion to other countries and, reading from
a report of British India, he co'ntiuued:
"British India only has 8o0,000 square
miles, while, it has a population of 250,
000.000. We have 3,000,000 square miles
and ought to support easily 200,000,000
people. There is no such a body of land
in the world as that of the Mississippi
basin that will produce crops without
irrigation.
"The trouble is that neither we nor our
English ancestors have been accustomed
to irrigation. In India about $1,000,000,-
000 have been spent on railroads and
irrigation in the last thirty years.
"Let us get the surveys, and make it
possible for the people to get the titles.
Then we will move along. Forty acres
of irrigated land is as safe for a family as
lou acres depending on rainfall."
senator & tan lord here asked Senator
Stewart if he had investigated the relative
cost of clearing and irrigating land . "It
is a most important matter," abided Sen
ator Stanford. to know iust what the
difference in cost, is."
"I was up in Washington Territory a
year ago responded Senator Stewart,
and asked what jt would cost to clear the
timber land there, and nobody put it at
less than $100 an acre. A fair estimate
of the cost of reclaiming desert lands
Notico is hereby Kivea "lnt the roiitnl on the
contracts of lease to the following described
Edncntional Lands situated in Lincoln county,
Nebraska, as set opposite the names of the re
spective holders thereof is delinquent, viz:
Albin Stolle. his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, nil of section town 10, .range 2S.
Albin Htolle, his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, nil section It!, town 13, range 35.
Albin Stolle, his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, nil Fection Hi, town , range 2-5.
Albin Stolle, his heirs, nssijrns or administra
tor. aU section Hi. town 13, range 31.
Albin Stolle. his heirs, assigns, or administra
tor, all section H5, town 15, range '7.
Albin Stollo. his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, all section i, town Hi, range 27.
Albin Stolle, his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, all section 88, town 11, range 23.
Albin Stolle, Iiis heirs, assigns or administra
tor, all section ai, town 9, range 32.
Albin Stolle, his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, all section IB, town 16. range 30.
Albin Stollo, his heirs, assigns or administra
tor, all section 30, town 10, range 32.
Lizzie Heed, no grand whfandso qr section
Hi, town 11. range 27.
Lizzie Iteed, w hf and so qr and no qr section
3(5, town 12, range 31.
Lee Skinner, all section 30, town 10, range 33.
Lee Skinner, all section 30, towh U, rnnge 32.
ltascor K. Brnner. ehf se qrt-ectionM, town 11,
range 28.
ltascor K. Brnner, w hf w h asd o hf e hf and
w hi no section 3)5, town 14, inngo2S.
Kjiscor K. Brnner, lots 8, 1, 5, 0, 7. 8 and S, sec
tion Hi, town 12, range 27.
J J. McCnllough, all section Hi, town 9,
range 27.
J. J. McCullough, n hf section Hi. town 13,
rango 27.
Herman Knccht, all section Hi, town Hi range
31.
Frank Gay, all section SO, town 15, range 28.
Franz Hopfen. all section 10. town 11, range 33.
Florence Skinner, all section 30, town 11,
rango 33.
W. V. Irvine, all section Hi, town 11, rango 31.
J. B. Keilly, all section 80, town 15, range 31.
John Heed, west half section 30, town 13,
range 27.
lloward Hicks, southeast quarter section Hi,
town 10, rango 2S.
PatricK II. McConley, west hnlf section 30,
town 12, rango 33.
Oscar HoUman, all section 30, town 13, rango
33.
D. ('. Stapleton, all section 30. town9,rango3t.
H. K. Nichols, all scctieu 30, town 10, range 31.
Peck & Kernne qr and sc qr section 30, town
15, range 20.
John li. Iluun. 8 hf 6W section Hi, town 11,
range 20.
It. C. Connor, all section Hi, town 10, range 27.
(ieo. Hill, all section 30, town 1', rango 27.
W. E. 1'euch, all section 10, town 15, rango 20.
And nnless such delinquency is paid within
ninety days from the date of this notico such
contracts will !o declared forfeited by the Board
of Educational Lands nnd Fnnds, and said for
feiture will be entered of record in the manner
prescribed by law
Dated at Lincoln, Nebraska, this "Jth day of
Angnst, 18S.
By order of
JOHN STF.EN.
Com. P. & B.
Attest:
C. E. OSGOOD,
313 Treas. of Lincoln Co.
NOTICE OF
SALE UNDElt
3IOKTGAGE.
CHATTEL
Notice is hereby given that by virtne of a
chattel mortgage dated February 19th. 1889, and
duly filed and recorded in the oifice of the clerk
of Lincoln county, Nebraska, on February 19th,
1889. and executed by Patrick Ituddy and Mary
ltnddy to Hershey fc Co. to secure the payment
of the sum of $20.00 on July 1st, 1889, $13.00 on
Angnst 1st, 1889, $15.00 on September 1st, 1889,
$3.00 on October 1st, 1S39,$5.00 on November 1st,
1889. and 15.00 on December 1st, 1889; default
having been mzdo in the sums due on July 1st.
18S9, and Angnst 1st, 1889, the mortgagees elect,
as in said mortgage provided, to declare the
whole sum secured thereby due and payable and
upon which there is now due the sum of $88.93.
No suit or other proceeding al law having been
instituted to recover said debt or any part
thereof, therefore wo will Bell the property
therein described, viz: one sorrel mare with
white stripe in forehead and branded S M on
left shoulder and ubout nine years old, weight
about 1,000 pounds, ono 3-inch Milburn wagon
complete and nearly new, one white roan com
ing one-year-old heifer, one red and white com
ing one-year-old heifer, one red roan or spotted
three-year-old cow; said wagon being subject to
a senior mortgage of $23.00; at public auction at
the livery bam of 8. W. VanDoran in North
Platte, Lincoln county, on the 31st day of Aug.
1889, at two o'clock p. m. of said day.
Dated Aug. 0th, 1889.
HERSHEY & CO.,
Nesbitx & Gbi jies. Mortgagees .
313 Attj b for Mortgagee.
( The Greatest Dry Goods Sale Ever Offered. 0,000 Just
( Received Direct From Lee, Tweedy & Co., New York.
We are bound to sell and at prices that will suprise the whole country.
Look at these prices:
Five Thousand Yards Best 8-cent Calico at Six Cents.
Five Thousand Yards Lonsdale Muslin at 8 1-2 Cents.
Five Thousand Yards Unbleached at 6 1-2 Cts.
5,000 Yards Dutch Blue Best Quality, at 12 I -2 Cts.
5,000 YARDS NEW STYLE GINGHAMS.
IN OUR DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT
We
have the largest variety ever
Henrietta Cloths, the very latest
and Colored Brillianteens, the
shown in the city. Colored Silks,
shades, Handsome line of Black
latest dress goods in the market.
IMMENSE LINE OF LADIES' CLOAKS AND WRAPS,
Newmarkets in Fiue English Cloths. Fine line o Plush Wraps.
BARGAINS IN SHOES.
We put on sale a fine line of 5.50 French Kid Shoes at $o.50. Also a
large line of American Kid at 1.00, reduced from 2.50 and &o.
Two-plys,
designs.
CAEPETS.
Ladies are invited to examine our immense line of carpets.
Three-plys, Tapestry and Body Brussels, in the very latest
lhirty patterns to select from. The only line in town.
RENNIE S NEW PALACE OF FASHION,
Spruce Street, Opposite the Postoffice.
NOriCE TO HRIDGE BUILDERS.
Sealed bids will be received at the office o the
County Clerk of Lincoln until Monday, Sept. 9,
188U, at'Z o'clock p. in., for a bridge. across the
Flatto Hirer on a public highway on section line
between sections 10 and 11, 14 and 15. 22 and 23,
township 12, rango 27, in Lincoln County, Ne
braska Said bridge will be a pilo bridge about 3,000
feet long.
Plans and specifications for said bridge havo
been adopted by the Jioard of County Com
missioners nnu all bids will be made on satd
plans.
Said plans can Ie seen at the oilice of the
County L lerk at North Platte, Nebraska.
,1. ho Board reserves the right to reject any or
all bias.
By order of Board of County Commissioners of
Lincoln (..ounty, Nebraska
J. E. Evans.
3J I County Clerk
UNDERTAKING.
30,000 ACRES
OK
Desirable Faniiiiiff Land
IN
LINCOLN & KEITH COUNTIES
JPOl SALE.
-o-
These Lauds lie between the North
and South Platte llivers, in Kanges
33 to 37 inclusive, on the line of the
Union Pacific Railway.
Prices, terms and full informa
tion can be obtained on application
at the office of
DILLON & COLLINS,
North Patte, : rNebraska.
"GUY'S PLACE."
I liereby announce that I have
opened out a large stock of Under
taker's Supplies, such as
Metallic and Cloth Draped
CASKETS,
Wooden Caskets,
And Burial Cases.
Also a hue stock of Shrouds, Lin
ings, Trimmings, etc. In connec
tion I have one of the finest hearses
in the west. Prompt attention to
all calls in city or country. Prices
reasonable. Koom on Locust St.,
opposite Hershey & Co.
SAML. ADAMS, Prop.
FIRST-CLASS
Sample :-: Boom,
EST Having refitted our rooms
throughout, the public is invited to
call and see us.
ONLY
Choice :! Wines, ;: Liquors and :! Cigars
Kept at the Bar.
Agent for the celebrated
IDA1IHA ' NATURAL XIHESAl WATER
from Soda Springs, Idaho.
Keith's Block, Front Street.
NOKTH PLATTE. - NEBRASKA
PRINCIPAL POINTS
EAST, WEST,
Tito
ON SALE
TO ATjIj
'Ji MacLEAN,
Fine Boot and Shoe Maker,
Ami Dealer In
MEN'S LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S'
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Perfect Fit, Best "Work and Goods
Represented or Money Refunded.
asi
REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE.
NORTH 'PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
-A. UEW H A. 3NT ID
AT THE HELLO WS.
O
HnvinK purchased the Mlaek
tjmith Business of Hershey & Co.
iwill continue the name at the
old stand, cor. Fifth and Locunt
streets. All kinds of
Blacksmithing, ::: Horseshoeing-,
AND
Wagon and Carriage Hepairin
promptly executed in firet-clast style. Having
the best machinery west of Kearney, my facilities
for doing work quickly are unsurpassed.
My prices are very low, but cannot give
C red it. Please do not ask for it.
JOHN II. HARDEN,
The Cash Blacksmith,
NORTH PLATl'f.
Bismark Saloon
NORTH
a i in
SOUTH
r -NORTH
PLATTE, - NEB
J. O. Ferguson, Agent.
Billiard and Pool Hall,
J. C. HUPFER, Pii0p.?
Keeps none but the finest Whiskies,sitch jis
ROBINSON OOlfNTi:, TENN.
GOON HOLLOW,
JL V. M0NA11CI1.
0. F. C. TAYLOJi
GUCKENIIEIMER RYE.
WELSH AND HOMESTEAD
Also line case goods, Brandies, Rum, Giu
Etc. St. Louis Bottled Beer and
Milwaukee Beer on draft.
Corner Sixth and Spruce Streets
NORTH PLATTE, - . NEBRASKA

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