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Lincoln County tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1885-1890, October 09, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010270502/1889-10-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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r THE TRIBUNE. ." ' QY - e. burner, ' : J:
. Mfe." Funeral Director
STEVENS & BARE, Prop's. a w .mttfh - - uuoxwi w
TERMS: mS3Si 1 - --- - I
"VOL. T. NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA, OCTOBER 9; 1889. NO. 39.
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If paid in Advance, only $1.00 per year.
One Year, if not in Advance, $1.50.
Six Months, in Advance, - - - .75
Three Months, in Advance, - - .50
Advertising Rates on Application.
Keeps constantly in stock Metalic and Cloth
Draped Caskets, complete line of Trimmings
in white and black, Gloes White Caskets,
Coffins of all sizes, Shrouds & Shoes.
Telegraph orders promptly attended to&!
OPEN DA AND-StTffHR,
EMBALMING A SPECIALTYSsfa
Sixth Street, east of Locust.
NORTH PLATTE, : : NEBRASKA
FALL STOCK
IS COMPLETE IN
r
ALL DEPARTMENTS
And open for inspection with the finest
line of Men's, Boys' and. Children's
BUEYDfG OF THE DEAD.
CHANGES IN FUNERAL CUSTOMS
DICTATED BY GOOD SENSE.
CLOTHING-
Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps,
AND AT
I
Rock Bottom Prices.
1 1 nnm m n
M.
Leaders
SE,
EINSTEEN k Co.
of Fashion and Low Prices.
Ho. 34S6.
BANK,
FIRST NATIONAL
TsToi-th. Platte,
Authorized Capital, $200,000. Paid in Cawtal, $50,000.
Banking ,In All Its Branches Transacted
Womea No Ixmcer Expected to Attend
Faaexal Services, Nor Men to Stand with
Bared Heads by the Grave No Long
Procession of Carriages.
The undertakers of this city announce
that funerals are no longer what they
used to be. Women are no longer ex
pected to attend them, and with some
exceptions they don't. The statement of
this fact was brought about through the
publication in a Philadelphia newspaper
of a number of interviews with under
takers in that city. In a recently pub
lished death notice of a woman in Phila
delphia this sentence was embodied:
"Male members of the family only are
invited to attend." This notice was pub
lished in accordance with the wishes of
the dead woman. She had been of a
practical and sensible turn of mind. Her
object was to prevent the attendance at
her funeral of women who might, if it
were bad weather, contract disease of a
serious nature.
IN PHILADELPHIA.
Until very recently numerously at
tended funerals had been very common
in Philadelphia. Scores of carriages fol
lowed the deceased man or woman to the
grave, and men and women stood around
on the damp ground in all kinds of
weather while the coffin was lowered
into its last resting place. Philadelphia
is gradually awakening to the fact that
this sort of thing is dangerous. Strange
to say, it appears to be due to the under
takers of that city that these changes are
being made. Evidently they are not so
calculating and selfish as various writers
of fiction have portrayed them. The
more carriages there are at a funeral the
bigger the undertaker's bill is, yet the
Philadelphia members of the profession
seem to view this fact with indifference.
Said Mr. R. R. Bringhurst, one of the
most prominent of these gentlemen:
"The custom in vogue here of a large
concourse of friends and relatives at
tending funerals is a very foolish one.
Male members of the family only should
accompany the hearse to the burial
CLAY THEIR DAILY FOOD.
SUCH IS THE DIET OF A CURIOUS
SET OF PEOPLE IN ALABAMA.
A Peculiar Complexion Seemingly the
Only Bad Effect How the Clay N Eaters
Live and Get Their, Daily Clay One of
Tli em Interviewed to Littlo Purpose.
'Those people are clay eaters."
The people referred to were a group of
men and women of various ages who
had gathered at a country store in Win
ston county, Ala., to barter a few egg3
and chickens for coffee and tobacco.
They were poorly clad, men and women
were barefooted, and three children in
the party were also bareheaded. Their
faces were pale and haggard, and in their
dyes was a dull, hopeless look, showing
that they were not only densely ignor
ant, but without ambition to better their
condition in. any way. The storekeeper,
after attending to the wants of these
strange customers, informed the writer
that they belonged to the poorest class
of mountaineers who inhabited that sec
tion, and that white clay was a part of
their regular diet.
The writer spent several days in Win
ston county recently and visited the
homes of a number of these people who
eat clay as a part of their daily food.
They live in small log cabins of the rud
est kind, and eke out a miserable exist
ence by farming, hunting and fishing.
Their farms, or patches as they call
them, are small clearings around their
cabins, and are never more than a few
acres in extent. Their ,crop3 consist of
corn, peas, potatoes, and a few who are
fortunate enough to own a horse attempt
to raise a little cotton. The land is very
poor, and as the crop3 receive little work
the yield is always very poor. Men,
women and children are slaves to the
tobacco habit. The women chew and
smoke, and most of them also use snuff
when they can obtain it.
. THE ABODE OF A CLAY EATER.
The interior of the cabin of a clay eat
er is rude in the extreme. The cabin is
usually built of small pine logs, from
which the bark is sometimes removed.
There are no windows and usually only
one door. There are no pictures on the
ground, and I am glad to see that this j walls, no ornaments of any kind and
Sell Bills of Exchange Direct on Great Britain and Ireland, Switzer
land, France, Belgium, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark,
Italy, Russia, Spain, Portugal, Germairy and Austria.
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS.
$50 REWARD.
By virtue of the laws of the State of Nebraska,
I hereby offer a reward of Fifty Dollars for the
capture and conviction of any person charged
with horse stealing in Lincoln county.
D. A. BAKER,
Sheriff.
R. D. THOMSON,
icliitect,
Contractor and Builder.
127 Sixth St. Cor. of Vine,
NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
RICHARDS & Co.,
CONTRACTORS,
OMAHA, - jSTEB.
U. P. TIME TABLE.
GOI.NG EAST.
No. G Chicago Express Dept550 A. M.
No. 4 Fast Express " 10:50 a. m.
No. 2 Atlantic Express " 8:05 p. m.
No. 22-Freight " 530 A M.
GOING WEST MOUNTAIN TI11E.
No. 1 Fast Exoress Dept 5:10 a. si.
No. 3 Pacific Express " 6:10 v. 31.
No. 5 Denver Express " 8:10 p. M.
No. 23 Freight " 7:15 a. M.
J. C. Febguson. Agent.
NESBITT & CRIMES,
Attorneys-at-Law,
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBli.
Office oveb Foley's Stohe.
B. 1. Hinman.
T. FcTroN Gantt.
We contract on everything in the
line of building.
I. K. S0MERS,
Nurseryman,
Florist and Gardener,
(BARTON PLACE,)
NORTH PLATTE, NEBR.
Can furnish all kinds of fruit and
shade trees, forest trees, and seed
lings for tree claims at lowest
prices. Also all kinds of plauts and
flowers. Estimates and designs
given for laying out new grounds.
Yards kept by contract.
Martin & Nauman
BUTCHERS,
AND DEALERS TS
HINMAN & GANTT,
Attorneys - a,t - Ziaw.
Will practice in all the courts of the State.
Offico over the Postoffice.
C. M. DUNCAN, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Office: Otteustein's Block, up 6tnirs. Office
hours from U to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p. m
.Residence on West Sixth Street.
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBRASKA.
Doctor McNEIL SMITH,
Graduate o the Royal Colleges of Physicians
and Surgeons, Edinburgh,
Fscs-sioiAsar.
Office and Residence,
Wellfleet, - Nebraska.
P. WALSH,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates on Work Furnished.
Shop Corner Cottonwood and Third
east of Catholic church.
Sts
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
Notice is hereby given that I will examine all
persons who may desire to offer themselves as
candidates for teachers of the common schools of
this county on -the THUtD TUESDAY of every
month.
R. H. LANGFORD,
County Supt.
9
fH&MS ,BACON, SAUSAGE
AND FISH.
Highest Price Paid for Fat Stock.
Sixth Street, between Spruce and Pine,
NORTH PJjATTE, - ,t NEB.
A. P. CARLSON,
Merchant
Tailor.
Full line of piece goods always on
hand and made to order."
Only first-class workmen employed.
Shop on Spruce Street over Hane Gertler&Co.
plan is being adopted by several fam
ines of this city. Ladies should not be
taken to the burial ground, for more
than one reason, either in good or bad
weather. It subjects them to a great
nervous strain to see the body of some
member of their family or some relative
lowered into the ground, and time and
time again I have seen ladies faint from
this excitement.
- "Sometimes "thero is a -hitch in the
dropping of the coffin, so that considera
ble difficulty is occasioned in getting it
straightened out. Accidents of this na
ture are very prolific of nervous pros
tration, and women should not be sub
jected to them.
"It is a striking fact that half of our
funerals take place on stormy days, when
it is positively dangerous for any man,
not to mention ladies, to stand for a
longtime on the wet-ground until the
interment is finished. This city is, how
ever, getting to be somewhat enlighten
ed on the subject of funerals. A few
years ago there were forty or fifty car
riages to every funeral, bub now this
number is reduced to about eight. Of
course, the more people attend funerals
the better it is for the undertaker. His
business is advertised, and he comes in
for the burial of those who are taken
mck'and die because of the exposure at
the burial ground. But we undertakers
have sympathetic souls like other classes
of humanity, and I for one advise all my
patrons to have the funeral ceremony at
the house, and then let only a few gen
tlemen of the family accompany the
body to the cemetery."
Undertaker J. R Knowles expressed
the same sentiments and added:
"The exclusion of ladies and friends
at funerals is an admirable policy to
adopt. This city is just awakening to
the fact that a big funeral is a big folly.
As a rule every large funeral is the
cause of the death of at least one person
who attends it."
New York adopted the new custom
Bomo time since. Savo in the case of
men of great official prominence, few
funerals, with the exception of those of
foreigners and persons of- the poorer
class, who accept innovations in such
matters slowly, are largely attended,
even by men. Nowadays there are rare
ly more than three or four carriages at
the funeral of a person of good social
rank, and fivo seems to be the maxi
mum. The more fashionable the fam
ily the simpler the arrangements are.
At a large proportion of such funerals
that have taken place lately there have
been only one or two carriages besides
the hearse. Undertaker Edward M. Se
nior said yesterday:
"At three-quarters of the funerals I
have had in charge lately, no women
have been present. As a rule they do
not even sit in the same room with the
body of the dead. The body is usually
placed in the parlor, and some male rel
ative remains there to receive visitors
and do whatever is needed, while the
women stay upstairs. They may come
down to be present at services in the
house, but they rarely follow the body
to the grave. Even when- they do this,
they do not leave their carriages."
It is not uncommon now for persons
to provide minutely for their burials in
their wills, and many prudent ones ex
pressly request that no woman be al
lowed to follow their bodies. When the
late actor, Chanfrau, died, the funeral
at Long Branch was largely attended.
The pall bearers were all old men, and
they dropped one end of the coffin in
going out of tho house. The widow
fainted at the sight, and a painful scene
was the result. The new rule is to have
8ra coffin carried by hired assistants,
while the pall bearers walk on either
ride. New York Sun.
For choicest
Pork call on
cuts of Beef. Mutton or
Klekk & Gat ward.
often no furniture worthv of the name.
If there are bedsteads they are of the
crudest kind, made by the head of tho
family with no other tools than a saw
and an ax. Usually the cabin is too
small for bedsteads if the family is large,
and thoy sleep on quilts and mattresses
spread on the floor. The entire family,
often ten or more persons, eat and sleep
in one small room. Thocopking is done
in the one .replace. theufiiisH .consist
ing of a frying pan, a ktttlo, an oven
and possibly a few pots. Cooking stoves,
sewing machines and all modern conven
iences are unknown.
The clay eaten by these people is found
along the banks of the small mountain
streams in inexhaustible quantities. It is
of a dirty white color usually; sometimes
a pale yellow. It has a peculiarly oily
appearance, and this oil keeps it from
sticking to the hands or mouth. When
dry it does not crumble, and a few drops
of water will easily soften it until it can be
rolled into any shape desired. It is almost
without taste, but must possess some
nourishment, as these people declare they
can subsist upon it for days. They place
a small piece in the mouth and hold it
there until it gradually dissolves, and is
swallowed in small quantities at a rime.
The quantity eaten at one time varies
from a lump as large as a pea for the
child or beginner to a Jump as large as
a hen's egg for those who 4iave eaten it
for years.
A CLAY EATEli INTERVIEWED.
'How did you learn to eat clay?" I
asked of a man whose face was almost
the color of the stuff he was eating.
"Dunno," he answered. "I seen pap
and t'others eatin' it, an' I got at it."
"Does the habit grow until you acquire
a taste for tho stuff?"
"Huh?"
"Can you quit eating clay?"
"Dunno; never tried."
"Has tho stuff a pleasaut taste?"
"If 'twantgood I wouldn't beeatin'UV
and tho native drew a second lump from
his pocket aud began to eat it with a
relish.
The only bad effect of clay eating seems
to be the peculiar appearance it gives the
skin of those who become addicted to the
habit. The skin turns pale, so pale, in
fact, as to give the face the pallor of
death, and then, later on, it turns a pe
culiar pale yellow, a color closely re
sembling some of the" clay eaten. Chil
dren who become addicted to the habit
grow old, at least in appearance, prema
turely, and their faces lose forever the
bright glow of youth and health. There
is littlo sickness among the clay eaters,
and they live as long as the average of
mankind, so it is conclusive that the
habit is not fatal in its effects.
It may or may not be the result of clay
eating, but these people are as supersti
tious as the black followers of a voodoo.
They have signs for everything and al
most worship the moon. Corn is planted
when the moon is full and potatoes are
planted in the dark of the moon. They
will not start on a journey or begin a job
unless the moon is right, and they fore
tell storms and all kinds of disasters by
the appearance of the moon. If one end
of a new moon is lower than the other it
will rain before tho moon changes again,
say the clay eaters, but if the moon is
level there will be no rain until another
change occurs. Macon (Ga.) Telegraph.
Bludbuilder.
Tho now vegetable tonioalterativo and blood
purifier is in the shape of a pleasant syrap, and
contains in a concentrated form the most
valuable vegetable curatives, which have been
developed by modern medical and scientific
research. It acts directly upon tho blood.
through it imparting vigor to the entire system
and eradicating disease, and isnnequaled as a
care far Scrofulous, Cancerous and other humors,
whether constitutional or otherwise, Catanh,
Rheumatism, Dyspepsia, Dropsy, sick and
nervous, headache, female- weakness, and all
blood, liver and kidney disenses. Price $1. Sold
by A. S. Stroitz.
Bernhardt' Late Husband.
He was known in European theatrical
circles as Daria, and, it is said, claimed
to be a count. As he was born in Greece,
where there are no titles except official
ones, and in the royal family, he had no
birthright to ono. He has often been re
ferred to as a diplomat. His diplomatic
experience was not very extensive. He
was once connected with the Greek con
sulate for a few days through an acci
dent. His real vocation was that of a
commercial traveler. The elder Damala
was a trader in raw silk, having a house
in Syria, and the son is said to have been
unusually successful in disposing of the
father's wares. It is even said that he
had no right to his high sounding name
that he assumed "Aristides" for his
own satisfaction, and that ho was chris
tened as only "Jacques."
Damala was fond of gambling, and a
swarm of creditors is believed to have
hurried his marriage and to have fol
lowed him unrelentingly until ho left for
Barcelona. He was once mixed up in a
gambling caso with. Lambri Pasha, but
his friends say that he was never a black
leg. At the time of his marriage with
Bernhardt nobody seemed to know
whether his first wife was dead or not.
Buring the time he played with Bern-hardt-ho
did all he could, it is said, to
excite her jealousy. When she was on
the stage and he was in the wings he
used to flirt abominably with Mile. Lima
Maute. Thi3 was in Italy, where Bern
hardt had frequent fainting fits on the
stage. Exchange.
On Their Heads.
In France, when a patient is under
chloroform, oa the slightest symptom
appearing of failure of the heart, they
turn him nearly upside down, that
is, with his htiad downward and his
heels in tho air. This, they say, always
restores him; and such is their faith in
the efficacy of this method, that tho op
crating tables in the Paris hospitals are
made so that in an instant they can be
elevated with one end in the air, so as
to bring the patient into a position re
sembling that of standing on his head.
Boston True Flag.
Parents should he careful that their
children do not contract colds during the
fa!! or osirly winter months Such colds
weaken the- iiiiijs nd air passages,
making tlsa child nun h more likely to
contract, othr colds during the winter.
It is this succession of colds that cause
catarrh and bronchitis Jr puvrs the vr
for consumption. Should a cold be
constructed, loose no time but cure it as
quick as postble. A fifty cent bottle of
Chiiinb(Iain'?XJiti;iirivf-ijpII;' w ill " eu're
any cold in :i few days and leive tho re
spiratory orirans btmng and healthy.
For sale by A. F rftrietz and Dr. Longley
North Phitte.
AT THE NEW ST0EE.
RENNIE S GREAT FALL SALE.
j The Greatest Dry Goods Sale Ever Offered. 6,000 Just )
Received Direct From Lee, Tweedy & Co., New York, j
We are bound to sell and at prices that will suprise the whole country.
Look at these prices:
Five Thousand Yards Best 8-cent Calico at Six Cents.
Five Thousand Yards Lonsdale Muslin at 8 1-2 Cents.
Five Thousand Yards Unbleached at 6 1-2 Cts.
5,000 Yards Dutch Blue Best Quality, at 12 1-2 Cts.
5,000 YAEDS NEW STYLE GINGHAMS.
EN OUR DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT
We have the largest variety ever shown in the city. Colored Silks,
Henrietta Cloths, the very latest shades, Handsome Hue of Black
and Colored Brillian teens, the latest dress goods in the market.
IMMENSE LINE OF LADIES' CLOAKS AND WRAPS,
Newmarkets in Fine English Cloths. Fine line of Plush Wraps.
BARGAINS IN SHOES.
We put on sale a fine line of 5.50 French Kid Shoes at 3.50. Also a
large line of American Kid at 1.90, reduced from 2.50 and &3.
CAEPETS.
Ladies are invited to examine our immense line of carpets. Two-plys,
Three-plys, Tapestry and Body Brussels, in the very latest designs.
Thirty patterns to select from. The only line in town.
II S NEW FALAGE OF FASHION,
Spruce Street, Opposite the Postoffice.
mi
CENTRAL LAW SCHOOL,
LINCOLN, NEBx.
Newly established. First annual setion Nov.
atli, 18S. June 7th, 1800. Moot courts and
quizzes. Special lectnrc3 by eminent lawyers.
Expenses low. Superior court and library facili
ties. Vot particulars address W. SIORrON
SMITH, Secretary. VJ2 North Eleventh street,
Lincoln, Neb. 374
parmers
Alliance.
NOTICE TO HUNTKIIS
Notice is hereby given that hunting on
th? lands of tfie under.Mirned is strictly
forhiddeu. All jhtsous m trebpatsinir
will !( prosecuted to the full extent of
the law.
8w Paxtox & Rkiwhkv.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNERS.
Property owners and others are request
ed to remove at once all refusp from the
alle3's bordering on their lots in com
pliance with ordinance relating thereto.
Street Commissioner
sr01
The Grand Island
S&nifaricim
Under tlio Management oi '
DRS. ALEY AND FREE,
For the treatment of all C hronic and Snrgical
Diseases and Diseases of the
1 desire to announce to members
of the Alliance and all other far
mers that I am agent for the Eoyal
Windmills, Davis Vertical Feed
Sewiug Machines aud American
Lightning Rods. I also make a
specialty of erecting windmills,
putting down hydraulic aud deep
well pumps aud repairing machines
of all kinds. Orders cau he left at
VoriGoetz's Grocery Store.
VICTOR E. MEYER,
Nolith Platte, Neb.
30,000 ACRES
OK
Desirable Fannin if Land
IN
LINCOLN & KEITH COUNTIES
FOR S.AJLE.
UNDERTAKING.
I hereby announce that I have
opened out a large stock of Under
taker's Supplies, such as
Metallic and Cloth Draped
CASKETS,
Wooden Caskets.
And Burial Cases.
Also a fine stock of Shrouds, Lin
iugs, Trimmings, etc. In connec
tion I have one of the finest hearses
in the west. Prompt attention to
all calls in city or country. Prices
reasonable. Room on Locust St.,
opposite Hershey & Co.
SAML ADAMS, Prop.
H. MacLEAN,
Fine Boot and Shoe Maker,
And Dealer In
MEN'S LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Particnlar attention paid to Deformities, Dis
eases of the Kidueys, Private Disease-', Dis
eases nt Women, Diseases of tho Skin,
Heart, Nervous system, Luiis and
Throat, Sargical Operations. Piles,
Tumors, Cancers, etc., etc.
Pleasant Rooms for Twenty
Five Patients,
Willi Hoard aud Attendance fc'nrnWied. Address
The Guaxd Islaxd Sanitarium,
Grand Island, - Nehraska.
These Lauds lie between the North
and South Platte liivers, in Ranges
33 to 37 inclusive, on the line of the
Union Pacific Railway.
Prices, terms and full informa
tion can be obtained on application
at the onice of
DILLON & COLLINS,
North Patte, : .-Nebraska.
Perfect Fit, Uest Work and Goods as
Represented or Monev Refunded.
REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE.
Dr. H. S. Aley will be at the
Nebraska House Oct. 10th.
ORDEK of bearing.
State of Nebraska. ) .
Lincoln Coanty. S
At a coanty coart, held atlhecoanty
court room, in and for said conn tv, September
27tu, A. D. 1889.
Present, J, J, O'Roarke, Coanty Judge.
In the matter of tho Estate of John D. Arn
old, deceased.
On reading and Slins the petition of D. C
Lord, praying that the instrument, filed on the
27th day of September, 18S9, and pnporting to be
tho last will and testament of the deceased, may
be proved, approved, probated, nllowed and re
corded as the last will and testament of the said
John D. Arnold, deceased, and that th-3 execu
tion of said instrument may be committed and
that the administration of said estate may bo
granted to D. C. Lord as executor.
Ordered, That October 21st, A. D. at 10
o'clock a. m., is assigned f.or hearing said peti
tion, when aU persons interested in said matter
matter may appear at a county court to be held
in and for said county and show cause why the
prayer of petitioner 6hould not be granted: and
that notice of the pendency of said petition and
tha hearing thereof be given to all persons inter
ested in said matter by publishing a copy-of this
order in the Lincoln County Tbibune, a weekly
newspaper printed in said county, for three suc
cessive weeks prior to said day of henring.
TA true copy 1
bl J. J. O'Houree, Count? Judge.
"GUY'sjlace:'
FS&SSY-CLASS
Sample :-: Soom,
. JT Having refitted our rooms
throughout, the public is invited to
call and see us.
ONLY
NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
Ji. ITEW SI A. ID
AT THE BELLOWS.
O
.Having purchased the Muck
smith Business of Hershey & Co.
I vpll continue the same at tho
nlrl Ktnrwl m VittV. 1 t .
eneeie. XVU Klaus Ot
Blacksmitlrincr ::: Horseshoeing
AND
IT
Wagon and Carriage Repairin
promptly executed m first-class style. Having
the best machinery west of Kearney, my facilities
for doing work quickly are iinsurpassed.
My prices are very low, but I can not give
credit. Pleas do not ask for it.
JOHN II. HARDEN,
The Cash Blacksmith,
NORTH PLATTE.
Bismark Saloon
Choice Wines, ;! Liquors :; and i1 Cigars
Kept at the Bar.
Agent for the celebrated
IDA1IHA mVSUl MINERAL WAIEE
from Soda Springs, Idaho .
Keith's Block, Front Street.
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBRASKA
NOTICE
TO CATTLE OWNERS. -Do
not turn your cows out until the
herder calls for them. I shall certainly
enforce the ordinance and impound every
animal found running at large in the city
limits. The Town Lot Co's addition is in
the city limits . This notice applies to
horses as well as cows.
Syl Fkiend,
Chief of Police.
Billiard and Pool Hall,
J. 0. HUPFEK, Phop..
Keeps none but the finest Whiskies.such as
ROBINSON COUNTY, TENN.
COON HOLLOW,
M. V. MONARCH,
0. F. O. lATLORi
GUCKENUEIMER RYE.
WELSH AND HOMESTEAD
Also lino case goods, Brandies, Rum, Gin
Etc. St. Louis .Bottled Beer and
Milwaukee Beer on draft.
Corner Sixth and Spruce Streets,
NORTH PLATTE, - - NEBRASKA

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