OCR Interpretation


The North Platte semi-weekly tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, February 26, 1895, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010270504/1895-02-26/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

JKfi -5.
VOL. XL
NORTH. PLATTE, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 26, 1895.
NO. 16
Our Spring stock of Ladies, Misses, Mens,
Boys and Childrens'
Shoes and Oxfords
Are now open for the inspection of the public.
"NVc have the Latest in Style, the .Best in Quality and sell
them at lower prices than any other store in town.
n Hit
Read this letter showing how strongly these Shoes are
recommended by their celebrated makers:
PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, FEB. 4th, 1893.
JULIUS PIZEII, NORTH PLATTE, NEB.,
Dear Sir Wo have tho pleasure of shipping you thiB day by B. &
O. freight some 788 pairs of Shoes and Oxford--. These wo have examined care
fully and pronounce them fully up to our standard in quality of stock and work
manship. Your selection of styles are mostly thoso which aro found tho most
popular sale this season through tho country. We guarantee every pair of our
shoes to you, so you can guarantee them to your customers. You will find your
name stamped on tho inside of every pair of shoos. Wo solicit a continuance of
your patronage, fully confident that you will recognize in tho merits of these
goods our desire to give you tho best possible values for the prices charged.
Respectfully,
PADAN BROS. & CO.
The -;- Boston -:- Store,
JULIUS PIZER, PROP.
f
GRO. W. DILxLARD,
PROPRIETOR OF THE
PIONEER COAL YARDS.
-ALL KINDS OF-
.Anthvacite and Bituminous Coal
Always on hand. Your patronage respectfully solicited.
Orders for coal left at Douglass' Drug; Store on Spruce
street will be promptly filled.
RRIGATED FIRMS TO REN
FOR PAKTJCULAKS APPLY TO
SUTHERLAND LAND & IRRIGATION CO.
SUTHERLAND, NEB.
I
ICsTO- 3496.
r
EL 3?J1.TTJS, NEB.
Capital, -
a,- . surplus,
$50,000.00.
$22,500.00
E. M. F. LEFLANG, Preset.,
ARTHUR AlcNAMABA,
Cashier.
A General Banking Business Transacted.
HNEST SAMPLE ROOM IN NORTH PLATTE
Having refitted our rooms in the finest of style, the public
is invited to call and see us, insuring courteous treatment.
Finest Wines, Liquors and Cigars at the Bar.
Our billiard hall is supplied with the. best make of tables
and competent attendants will supply all your wants.
KEITH'S BLOCK, OPPOSITE x'HE UNION PACIFIC DEPOT
County Correspondence.
Nichol Hnggeta.
Nichols, Feb. 25th.
S. W. VanDoran, of the hub, is
plastering" the interior of Paxton
& Hershey s new tenant houses.
His'brother Irve is assisting- him.
Rev. Franklin, of this circuit,
met his regular appointment at
Hershey Sunday evening.
Frank Zook and family returned
to the county seat Saturday.
T. W. Anderson, who has been
in poor health, is improving.
Mrs. F. W. Brooks received the
sad news a few days since of the
death of her only aunt, aged nearly
ninety-one, which occur red-i at' her
home in Janesville, Wis. Her hus
band, who died several years ago,
was a veteran of the war of 1812,
and she was receiving 12 per
month pension. Only three pen
sioners of that Avar survive her in
that state.
"We understand that the Camp
bellite preacher who -was booked to
speak at this place has cancelled
his engagement.
The revival meetings at Hershey
closed Kriday evening. They had
been in progress nearly three weeks.
It is said that many were snatched
as it were "like brands from the
burning."
D. T. Gibson and J. M. Dwyer
shipped a car of hogs and D. T. a
car of cattle to South Omaha Mon
dav. Dan accompanied them.
Frank Lingly from the vicinity
of Paxton was the ruest of the
Zook family the latter part of last
and the forepart of this week.
Truman Man, of Colorado, is
visiting his parents this week.
Messrs Randall. Wolf, Mais ner
and Minny are constructing irriga
tion ditches upon their farms so
as to kave them read- for business
when spring opens up.
Elijah Harris it the weather will
permit will leave by team for his
home in Missouri this week. He
will be accompanied by his sister
Mrs. Bertha McLaughlin widow of
the late Alex. McLaughlin.
Grangers are putting their tools
in shape for farming.
J. B. McKee of the hub is moving
to his farm near this place.
It is stated that J, G. Feeken
will erect an irrigation pump and
windmill upon his farm soon.
Several patrons of our school
visited it on Friday last. All seem
well pleased with the workings
therein.
W. J. Cruseu of North Platte
preached to a crowed house at Her
shey on Thursday and Friday even
ings last week.
G. E. Sulliuau is visiting rela
tives and friends at Brady Island.
AVe learn that Donald McLauch
lin has gone to Colorado where he
will purchase a carload of seed po
tatoes for himself and others along
the ditch.
A. B. Goodwin, who resided on a
ditch farm and acted as ditch rider
last season, has secured a similar
position at Carter, Wyo., and will
move there in the near future.
Several parties from this section
are thinking strongly of going to
Fort Bridger, Wyo., and taking up
claims. It is reported as a line
countiy with bright prospects be
fore it. Several who talk of going
own farms in this valley but have
never used their right in procuring
a homestead.
Pat.
SUTHERLAND NEWS.
Sutherland, Feb. 25th.
Deputy sheriff Keliher transacted
business in town Saturday.
Rev. Hatch, of Grand Island,
came up Saturday morning and
held services at the Presbyterian
church the following day.
The ball in Denny's hall Friday
night is said to have been a rather
rockj-" affair.
Judge Baldwin, of North Platte,
transacted legal business in our
village Saturday evening.
G. C. White's infant child has
been quite sick the past week, but
is now on the mend.
C. W. Burklund was in North
Platte Saturday attending to busi
ness. D. Hunter returned from Omaha
Saturday morning.
The entertainment given by the
Presbyterian church Saturday ev
ening was well attended and the
receipts are said to have been very
satisfactory.
Rev. Nichols, of Paxton, has
been holding meetings at the
school house in the evening during
the past week.
All the men and
Sutherland branch.
werking out water
laid off Saturday night. This will
leave the working force about thir
ty teams less than before.
Dudley Miller moved his furni-
teams on the
except those
rights, were
ture last week to the Murphy farm
near North Platte, where he has a
position.
Dame Rumor has it that Z. J.
Hosttetter will visit the mining
country of Wyoming in the near
future. -
D. Hunter attended court the
first of the week.
L. C. Applegatc and. best, girl
took in the sights in this -vicinity
Sunday.
The call bell has been taken out
of the depot at this point and some
folks figure that a night agent will
be a near future happening. Let
him come. We deserve two night
men if Hershey deserves the one it
has had, especially if the amount
of business done 4 -cuts -any demon
stration. J. H. Bonham, from near Wal
lace, was on our streets Friday.
Mr. Krabb, of the- south side
country near Paxton, was in town
Monday looking up irrigated lands.
Citizen.
Commissioners Proceedings.
Feb. 18. Communication from L.
Stebbins asking permission to
throw dirt from a proposed irriga
tion ditch into road No. 118: Road
to be left in good condition and of
an oval shape, ditch to act as a
drain for the road. Permission,
granted. Communication from A.
M. Mason declining to act as com
missioner of soldiers relief commis
sion received and approved. A. M.
Mason having declined the appoint
ment of member of soldiers relief
commission. Geo. Nauman is ap
pointed to fill vacancy. R. Hansen
appointed overseer of district No.
20. The following claims allowed:
A. E. Thorn, mdse, $4.90 on gen
eral fund; G. A. Walker. S9 bridge
work, on road fund: A. Kinkle,
damages, claim $30, allowed S20;
road No. 209 was declared a public
highway.
Feb. 19. Board inspected Max
well bridge.
Feb. 20. Continued inspection
of roads and bridges.
Feb'y 21 Official bonds of road
overseers of R. Hansen, Gus Linden
and John McCord, justice of the
peace W. T. S. Connor, and J. W.
Anthes constable, approved.
Consideration- of - road matters
continued, A. Kunkel requests per
mission to build a cattle pass under
road No. 209. Request granted
provided petitioner keeps pass in
good repair and puts highway in
good condition.
Feb. 22 Claim of R. D. Thomson
for $132 commissioner's salary al
lowed on general fund. A. D. Orr
proposes to bring forward delin
quent tax list for $30; proposition
accepted and work ordered.
General McCook said the other
day, in the course of an address at
a meeting of the Indian Rights
association at Denver, that in his
forty years' experience with the
Indians he had always found a
white man at the bottom of every
difficulty. He said,, that his deci
sions in cases of trouble between
whites aud Indians liad always
been in favor of the Indians.
A MARTYR
-TO-
INDIGESTION
Cured by Using
Ayer's Sarsaparilla
Words of Comfort to All who Suffer from
pyspepsia,
Os
O:
Si
O:
oj
o:
"For years, I was a martyr to
indigestion, arid hail about given
up all hope of ever finding relief,
as the complaint only seemed to
grow worse instead pf better,
under ordinary treatment. At
last. I was induced to trv AVer's
Sarsaparilla, and I hereby testify
that after using only three bot- JJ
ties, I was cured. I can, therefore, o:
confidently recommend this med- ol
icine to all similarly afflicted." i
Franklin Beck, Avoca, la, 53
"I am personally acquainted
witn mt. jecK anu believe any
statement he may make to be
true." W. J. Maxwell, Drug
gist and Pharmacist, Avoca, la.
"I have used Ayer's Sarsapa
rilla for general debility and, as
a blood -purifier, find it does ex
actly as is claimed for it." S. J.
ADA3IS, Ezzell, Texas.
AyefcSarsaparilia
Admitted for Exhibition
AT THE WORLD'S FAIR 3
oooooooooooooooooopooooc
0
03
o
o
oi
oi
02
o
oi
o
o
oi
o
o
3
WE PAY CASH 100 CENTS ON THE DOLLAR AND SELL
CHEAPER THAN ANY HOUSE IN THE CITY.
MMIE'S SLAUGHTER SALE--1895.
THE NEW TARIFF
On All Imported Woolen Goods and Silks
IS IN OPERATION JANUARY 1ST.
W; must close out our stock of nice fine goods and make room for our new stock
under the new tariff regulations. : : : $1.75 Silk Henrietta at $1.10: $1.50 Silk
Henrietta at 85 cts.: $1.00 Henrietta at 65 cts.; $1.25 Bedford C6rds at S5 cents; $1.25
French Serges at 85 cts.; $1.00 French Serges at 65 cts.; all wooll! yd. wide $1.25 Broad
Cloth at 75 cts.; 65 ct Flannels. 46 in. wide at 50 cts. : : : In our Shoe department
we offer the choicest line in the west, C. D. and E. widths, in fine new goods. : : :
Call and see for yourself the Wonderful Bargains at Rennie's for January and February in
1895. : . : Amoskeag Ginghams at 5 cts. per yard, Lawrence LL Muslin at 4 cts.
per yard, Lonsdale Muslin at 6 cts. per yard, at " RENNIE'S.
j SPRING IS COMING 1
AND YOU WILL NEED jg
- A STYLISH, NICE FITTING SUIT. I
To secure such it is not necessary to send out of
town, as many men have done in time past.
j F. J. BROEKER, THE MERCHANT TAILOR, 1
Is now making to order Nobby Spring Suits as low 3
j2 Twenty-Three Dollars. These suits are cut from j!
first-class goods, made in an excellent manner, and 5
S guaranteed to be a perfect fit.
g ORDERS SOLICITED FROM SURROUNDING TOWNS. j
F. J. BROEKER, MERCHANT TAILOR, NORTH PLATTE.
The Gandy Pioneer has this to
say of a gentleman well known in
this city who is now living just
over the county line in Custer coun
ty: "C. C. Babcock, of Logan pre
cinct, lias built a dam across a
canon on his farm for the purpose
of retaining the water that falls
during the spring on about 100
acres of prairie land and will use it
later in the season for irrigation.
From this reservoir he expects to
irrigate about thirty-live acres of
cultivated land. The dam is forty
feet wide, twenty feet high and 378
foot long. He expects to increase
the height to twenty-four feet. Mr.
B. has had but little 'expense in
building this dam. the only outlay
except his own labor being for about
650 feet of lumber. He owns a sec
tion of land and expects to build
three more reservoirs on his place,
if the one already built proves a
success, which will enable him to
irrigate 200 acres. Almost any
energetic farmer in this county can
and the
Babcock
inter-
build a similar reservoir
experiment made by Mr.
will be watched with
est."
great
- The following from the Kear
ney Hub might be of benefit to
many of the farmers in Lincoln
county as a suggestion in case
other means are not devised to get
seed: "Sheriff Nutter spent part
of the week in Lexington. On his
return he reported that Dawson
county was opposed to voting bonds
for seed and feed. He says that
the farmers of that count- are plan
ning to solve in a practical way
supplying any shortage in seed and
feed that ma- exist. They are
forming neighborhood clubs of ten
or twelve farmers, one or two of
whom is appointed as an agent to
act for the club in supplying the
shortage. He may arrange to
secure from elevator companies the
seed and feed needed for the whole
number, binding the members ot
the club in the ordinary way, or he
may solicit the supply needed from
friends in eastern states. The
clubs of farmers who are taking
this course are full of resources and
are not worried at all over the pros
pect of the coming year."
The Kearney New Era, a pop
ulist paper contains the following
misinformation. As a reliable
source of news it is only equaled by
its North Platte namesake: Lin
coln county is governed by a board
of supervisors, the same as in this
count-. Error No. 1. At the
last session of that body they
awarded the legal publishing and
tax list at full legal rates to one
newspaper. Error No. 2. Lin
coln county is a populist county.
Another horrible example of party
fealty to a populist newspaper."
IRRIGATION NOTES.
Concerning laterals for irrigat
ing purposes the Irrigation Age
says:- A fall of one foot in a hun
dred feet is as much as is usually
needed, and will give a velocity of
two or three feet per second in farm
furrows, depending on' how much
smoothing is done with hoe or drag,
and this is as fast as the water will
run without washing. Less fall
gives less speed about in proportion.
The capacity in cubic feet per sec
ond is found by multiplying the
water area in square feet by veloc
ity in feet per second. Main
lateral along farm fence should be
made permanent, and should be
broken, for taking water out, at
points only. Small laterals may be
torn away as fast as land is water
ed, beginning at the farther end.
In general, laterals are built up so
that the water is above ground.
Attention has been called to ex
periments in soil tillage which
showed that plats cultivated one
one-half inches deep evaporated
2.000 pounds less of water daily
than plats having no cultivation.
On a heavy clay soil this difference
amounted to 4,000 pounds per day
per acre. On a light garden soil it
amounted to 2,500 pounds daily per
acre. Referring to the influence of
salt and plaster on the evaporation
of water from soil, it has been said:
"A mixture of equal parts by
weight of salt and plaster applied
to the land at the rate of 4.000
pounds per acre conserved the
moisture of the first four inches to
the amount of fifteen tons of water
per acre; that is to say, the soil
which had been treated with this
mixture contained about two weeks
after the mixture had been sown
fifteen tons of water per acre in the
first four inches more than the ad-
j joining plats which were not treated.
This amount of water, it is true, is
not large, but it was large enough
during a drouth, when the experi
ments were conducted, to furnish
enough moisture to the growing
oats to be easily discernible by the
growth of the plant. There is not
the slightest doubt that a weekly
surface cultivation of orchards
from June until the last of Aujrust
greatly conserves the water in the
soil, while at the same time culture
sets free plant food, keeps the lower
strata of the soil cool and moist.
Wherever the conditions do not for
bid surface cultivation it should be
practiced extensively in orchards
for the three-fold purpose of con
serving moisture, preparing plant
food and shading that portion of
the soil which is occupied by the
roots of the growing plants."
Capt. Casey on alfalfa pork pro
duction: "After I got pure bred
Berkshires I made double the money
I did out of scrubs. I have two
five acre fields of alfalfa, so that I
can pasture my hogs in one while"
the other rested and was being irri
gated. One year I raised 385 head
pon ten acres of alfalfa pasture and.
at fattening time, after I had fed
them seventeen days on shorts and
alfalfa hay they weighed from 150
to 300, dressed weight. Many of
these got to 150 pounds in seven
months. Shorts and alfalfa hay
are. I think, quite equal to corn for
giving the finishing touch to pork.
The hay ought to be the first cut
ting and carefully "cured so as to
preserve all the leaves. The shorts
cost me one dollar per hundred
pounds, and I mixed 100 pounds
with 500 pounds of alfalfa hay,
which should be chopped. You
must be careful and have a good
high border between your two fields
for if the water comes into the
patch when the hogs are feeding
they cannot resist the temptation
to root into the cool moist earth.
At first I had a difficulty in pre
venting the animals from rooting
up and eating the alfalfa roots.
No amount of rings would prevent
this and ultimately I had to cut the
hard gristle of their snouts, for
which, you know, a special little
machine is sold. Fresh drinking
water is essential, as hogs will not
thrive on dirty water any more
than humans."
-Ex-Editor," in the Philadelyhia
Inquirer, says: "The man who is
looking for an easier job than the
one which now occupies his time
will make a great mistake if he
adopts the newspaper business. In
many respects it is a very fascinat
ing occupation. But it is a con
stant drain upon the vital forces.
It demands constant endeavor and
exposes to the keenest temptations.
It calls for the continued exercise
of the utmost wisdom, and it is
continually presenting the judg
ment with ultimatums that must
be answered at once, It requires
of its slave the widest possible
general knowledge concerning men
and things, and it no less insists
that there must be no decrease
from day to day in the strenuous
endeavor to produce a newspaper
that will interest and in inform the
public."
Studebaker Wagons
J Hershey & Go's.
at
j
I i
V
That the blood should perform
its vital functions, it is absolutely
necessary it should not only be
pure but rich in life-giving ele
ments. These results are best
effected by the use of that well
known standard blood-purifier,
Ayer's Sarsaparilla.
" 1 -

xml | txt