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The North Platte semi-weekly tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, September 26, 1913, Image 7

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THE NORTH PLATTE 8EMI-WEEKLY TRIBUNE.
NOTES cw
Bheop must havo shelter.
Poor cows are nover cheap.
Make capons of tho cockerels.
Keop only the monoy-maklng honk.
Ground bono can bo fed nlono or In
soft food.
Exposuro to hot sun will quickly
stnlo fresh eggs.
Havo somo way of telling the oldest
eggs nnd keep thorn sold.
It Ib a good rule to scald out tho
drinking vessels onco n week.
It takoB grit nnd pluck to bo a
poultrymnn this kind of weather.
Too much corn In tho feed In warm
weather makes tho hens fat and lazy.
Plnn to havo nt all times a blanket
of looso earth on tho surface of tho
fields.
Sashes Give Distinction to the Gown
HALTER-BREAKING COLT NOT DIFFICULT
IWBROOK
mm
I'McMUt'f
W X
frzaM
IF thcro nro girdlo or anahloBs
dresses designed for tho new sea
son, ttaoy Beem to bo keeping out of
eight Everything has a sash which
docs not define tho waist line, but
wanders abovo and below and around
or diagonally across and terminates
wherever it sees fit, Bometlmes at tho
bust, sometimes under tho shoulders,
again half way to the knees, and rea
sonably often somewhere near tho
waist lino.
Nearly all tho girdles are of tho new
and beautiful ribbons. Some of, them
aro of silk wrapped about the liguro
and extending from below the bust to
the swell of tho hlp3. To sum up the
matter, you may wear a sash or a
girdle of any sort of ribbon you chooso
and posed to suit yourself.
Four fashionable designs are shown
here. The first is called tho "Dres
den," and is made of molro ribbon in
all colors, with border and stripes in
Dresden patterns woven in. It con
sists of a girdle, a short, standing loop
and a long falling loop with one end
forming tho sash. At the heart of
this two-looped bow is a buckle made
of narrow velvet wound over a founda
tion of buckram. The velvet is in a
dark shade of tho same color as ap
pears in tho body of tho ribbon.
This is ono of tho most popular
of all tho many sashes now in voguo.
It requires about three yards of rib
bon, and 1b supported by narrow stays
when fitted to tho waist
Tho girdle without ends pictured
next is called the "Alsatian," taking
its name from tho bow of two loops,
and equal in length, which furnishes
It. It Is made of soft, mersa line rib
bon. Tho heart of the bow Is held in
place by two shlrrlngs over soft cord.
A yard and a quarter will mako this
girdlo for a waist of average size,
say 24 Inches. It is an easy matter to
calculate tho length required, since It
takes a trlllo more than a half yard
to make tho two loops. Adding to this
tho waist measure with a little allow
ance for making and fastening above
or below tho waist line, the length re
quired Is ascertained.
The wide nnd soft sash pictured next
Turban Designed
for Wear When
Using the Motor
TO Just what particular country of
tho far east wo are indebted for
the turban shown hero makes no dif
ference. India provides plenty of
modols for copies that aro effective
and becoming in proportion to their
fidelity to tho original.
Tho turban shown hero, designed
for motor wear, is made of a shaped
length of soft, changeable silk. It
wraps about the head and fastens
with loop and button at the top. Hero
a pretty ornament, a mock Jewel may
be used. Tho hair, except that about
tho forehead and a fow stray locks
about tho face, is entirely covered.
Tho coat la a mannish, rain-proof af
fair, with a velvet inlay on the collar
and on tho decorative straps that fin
ish tho sleovcs. It Is looso und roomy
and it is warm.
Tho pretty autolst Is provided with
a small bag made of silk, matching
the turban, in which she carries her
veil, goggles and what fow toilet ac
cessories she may need, when they
aro not in use. It does not need to bo
with Its suggestion of a butterfly bow,
is called the "Geisha." Wido ribbons
nro chosen for this, and an nraplo al
lowance for encircling tho wnlst, slnco
it is worn rather high.
Tho ends aro trimmed diagonally,
and hemmed. Tho hem Is finished with
hem-stitching or bordered with a vol
votribbon in tho samo color as tho
sash. This sash will requlro throe
yards and perhaps a little more. It do
pends upon the length of tho pnds.
Tho shorter one, as a rule, Is half a
yard long. Tho character of tho de
sign admits of shorter ends, but hard
ly of longer ones.
Tho carefully made and beautiful
girdle shown at tho right 1b appropri
ately called tho "American Beauty."
A soft, wido ribbon in rose shados is
chosen for this, which is designed for
afternoon or evening gowns. Tho rib
bon is laid in four plaits and tacked to
stays. Tho overlapping end of tho
girdle Is finished with a shallow loop.
Just at its baso two very realistic
roses (mado of ribbon) are posed with
a bit of millinery rose foliage- and
stems, aro sewed to tho ribbon and
tho stay which finished tho end.
Hooks and eyes provide a means of fas
tening. Tho story of sashes is a long one.
There 1b tho "WiBhbono" and tho "Sul
tana," both our Interpretation of ori
ental Ideas. There Is tho "New York"
and tho "Roman Girdlo," both excel
lent for plain cloth dresses, and tho
last particularly effective. Then
there is a big family of bordered
sashes, and all thoso girdles of bril
liant and rich brocades, with which
tho deep and somber colors used In
costumes aro mado to glow color,
which rioted during tho summer, until
our fashions wero color mad, has re
covered. Emerging from an all black
and all whito reaction (or a combina
tion of theso two) it is to bo handled
form the standpoint of art during tho
fall and winter that aro before us.
And It is tho sash moro than any
thing elso which will provide vivid
touches to enliven our apparel.
JULIA BOTTOMLEY.
any larger to accommodato a small
coin purse, a handkerchief or two and
little miror. This last slips into a
casing at tho bottom of tho bag on tho
outside. It is covered by a double
flap of Bilk, tho inner flap carrying a
few pins.
Thus equipped tho lady is prepared
to face wind and weather, dust and
flying gravel and to withstand tho
showers that may ovortako oven tho
speediest driver.
New Fall Draperies.
A vast majority of housewives will
bo delighted with tho many low-priced
materials that are to be displayed
among tho now draperies this fall.
Theso show both woven and printed
borders. There aro now designs In the
sun-faBt fabrics, In tho madrases, plain
and fancy, In cotton rep, cotton
armure, mercerized armure, poplins,
Flanders cloth, bengallno, double
faced damask and in mercerized Eton.
A white laco rug! Does that not sug
gest tho Irrational epitome? Yet tho
rug may be as practical as well as a
very striking bit of decoration. Tho
"not mesh" of tho rug Is of heavy
ropellko cords. Tho floral pattern Is
executed In coarsely knitted leaves
nnd flowers connected by stems that
suggest Renaissance applique. Sproad
over a dark green, blue or crimson
carpet lta beauty Is sufficient to sug
gest now possibilities in interior dec
oration. Cretonne-Lined Luggarje.
No longer is it considered smart to
go about with shabbf-looking luggage.
Ab soon as possible every paster is
washed from tho surface of a suit
caso or trunk, overy marring scratch
is painted over nnd every bit of brass
is polished. But above all, tho interior
of the luggago Is considered. Avaunt
with tho comomn looking linen lining.
In Its place thero aro tho daintiest of
flowered cretonnes, tacked to tho un
der side of lid, tho upper side of tray
and tho upper side of tho bottom by
tho nlmblo Angers of tho girl who ex
pects to put her prettiest gowns Into
tho box or tho caso.
Build yoursolf a silo.
Tho breed of a cow isn't all.
A poultrymnn works nil the time.
Shade is necessary in the hog lot
of course
Dlseaso waits at the doors of damp
poultry houses.
No one Bhould expect to get sound
colts from unsound sires.
If butter Is oversaltcd or over
worked Its delicate flavor 1b ruined.
If you keep sheep on the samo pas
turo year aftor year trouble Is sure to
follow.
When soft shelled eggs are very
numerous thero Is something lacking
in the ration.
When in full bloom Ib tho best
tlmo to plow under weeds In order to
destroy them.
Plenty of bedding In good Beason
will often help materially In Bavlng
a Utter of pigs.
As a rule hens that lay steadily
during cold weather aro Indifferent
hot-weather layers.
Hardiness docs not go by color of
plumage. HardlnesB depends upon tho
caro given to fowls.
Dairy farming Is more carefully
studied today than ever before and
it pays well for this.
Tho good cows In tho dairy are tho
ones that mako tho profit. The loss
Is with tho poor mllkerB.
When benn vines are wot, lot 'em
alone. Cultivate or hoo them only
when dry, or they'll bo rusty.
A maro may bo safely worked up to
within a week of foaling provided Bho
is nover subject to heavy strains.
Cut away all dead branches as soon
as discovered and cover tho wound
with paint to prevent further decay.
Clover has tho ability to obtain
nitrogen from tho atmosphere and
Incorporate it in Its roots, stem nnd
leaves.
Treat tho hired man as a human
bolng and furnish him with n cottagn
homo, not a shack stuck behind your
big red barn.
The acid of cream unduly sour de
stroys moro or less of tho butter fat
and If kept too long a bitter con
dition Is set up.
The real test of value In a horse
Is strength, lively action nnd on
durance and combined In the light
est weight possible.
The amount of limestone to use per
acre varies. When soil Is acid It re
quires from ono to threo tons per
acre to correct the ncldlty.
Thero Is not enough temper In the
whole township to conquer a balky
horso; bo thero Is no use for you to
match whnt you'd get agnlnBt one.
Mixed rations aro more economical
than the feeding of nny particular
article of food exclusively as somo
foods assist in tho digestion of others.
It Is Just ns necosary to keep tho
sheep supplied with green crops aft
er the meadows give out as It Is to
keep the stock going In tho samo
way.
Charcoal and grit should bo kept
where tho fowls can have access to
them at all times. They aro a pre
ventative as well as a cure for Indi
gestion. Look out for tho cattlo files when
they mako their appearance, nnd by
the application of some preventive
help to keep them free from these
troublesome pests.
The critical period In the young tur
key Is generally at an end when six
weeks of ngo. Inbreeding, lice, damp
ness and Improper food nro the main
causes for great mortality.
Scrub poultry may serve a good pur
pose In the pot, but they should not
bo permitted to propagate their kind.
Scrub hens should bo mated to pure
breed males so that tho breeding has
an upward rather than a downward
tendency.
If your poultry yards aro bare hov
no doubt get hard and baked these
lyit days. Spado up n part of them
preferably In somo shady corner nnd
see how tho fowls will onjoy dusting
In the soft dirt. It will moro thnn
pay you for your trouble
Tho lazy, sleepy looking sow, that
fats easy Is not tho ono to pick tor n
breeder.
Ovcrhend racks aro bad for tho
horse's oyes nnd mako tho horso In
halo dust.
Handling butter beyond what Is
strictly necessary does moro harm
than good.
Tho cow'b face will lndlcnto her
condition as surely as tho face of a
human boing.
Brood mares when nursing their
colts should bo given foods for the
production of milk.
Men may give good advlco, but you
must mako good uso of your own
sense In following It.
Nevor lightly roll oft tho responsi
bility of homo life upon tho shouldorB
of tho school teacher.
But It Is a mistake to rely solely on
broilers. It Is better to havo n broil
er and egg combination.
Ono good thing about tho garden is
that tho things wo get from It do not
taste so much of money.
See that every egg you sell Is strict
ly fresh. A fow bad eggs will glvo n
bad nnmo to tho wholo lot.
Tho destruction of tho weeds nnd
tho saving of molsturo will more
than repay for tho extra labor.
If your flock Is properly managed
and cared for there will bo llttlo or
no use for medicine and tonics.
Separator milk, If fed whllo It re
tains its natural warmth has a feed
ing value of four cents a gallon.
For early spring mating uso ono
drako to live or six ducks. Later tho
number of ducks can bo nearly dou
bled. Watch tho man who ubob a Bnbcock
tester on his cows tho first tlmo. Ten
to 1 thero will bo n chnngo In his herd
Boon aftor.
Dairy farming may well lncludo tho
ratslng of dnlry stock, hogs nnd
chickens, In connection with tho mar
keting of butter fat.
Nearly overy ono can keop hens,
but can every man mako tho hens
keep him? Hens do not pay unless
they nro given sultnhle caro.
A food may bo so lacking In palata
blllty that a cow will only consume n
sufficient amount to sustain herself
nnd of courso returns no profit.
Lnnd Is not a mine from which you
can tnko oro In tho shape of boII fer
tility year after year without appar
ent diminution of Its enrnlng power.
Unless soft food is being given
troughs should nover bo used for
feeding. Scatter grain among litter
nnd lot tho fowls scratch and hunt
for It.
Pruno out old canes of rnspberrlos
and blackberries, nnd burn them.
Thin the hills to threo or four shoots.
Cultivato and ndd somo manuro to
the soil.
If wo Becuro tho greatest returns
from hog pastures and forage crops
tho grain foods, which sorvo as a
supplement, should bo fed In limited
quantities.
Tho stnblo manuro has been put on
the garden or truck patch, tho corn
or wheat field, but rarely Is It thought
necessary to apply plant food of nny
kind to tho orchard.
Beef cattle may bo raised on mnny
farms, and thero nro good reasons for
raising them. Not tho least of those
Is thnt thoy provide a moans of
building up tho farm In fertility.
There Is no better germ slayer than
nn ounco of carbolic acid added to a
pall of whitewash Glvo tho wnlls nnd
celling of tho hen house a good coat
ing working It In rather thick In all
cracks and crevices.
Medium Blzed, hut plump turkeys
aro marketnblo all tho yonr round, bo
that nt any tlmo when there Is a but
plus they may be sold at fair prlcos,
but to eccuro tho nest prices they
must be young, and In good market
nblo condition, not too fat and not
too largo.
Turned Out
(Hy J. M. IICLL.)
Twonty-odd years ago tho wrltor
mot a Now York horBo dealer; this
Bnmo denier camo to Virginia nnd
bought a farm. Ho wanted to ralso
colts In addition to small farming.
First thoro was a pure bred Perch
oron stallion, then a number of well
Bet, well mado draft mares good In
dividuals, no nondescript, but as this
artlclo denls with tho colt proposition
wo'll get back to it.
At thlrty-slx hours of ago thoy wero
haltered and left in tho stalls ono
to a stall, of courso, ns tholr dams
slept thero at night.
Very soon tho colts woro perfectly
hnltcr-broken (long beforo thoy wero
weaned) nnd in being hnltcr-broken
thoy wero taught ono of tho most Im
portant things In horso breaking,
namely, to stnnd tied when hitched.
ThU ono quality Ib nbout half of tho
education of n horse, and without It
no horso Is properly broken.
Tho dams of theso colts wore
worked rcgulnrly on tho farm, earning
their own living and at tho samo tlmo
making something for tholr owner.
When old enough to cat solid food
thoy wero fed each day nnd Inter on
turned out to pnsturo, but still woro
given somo extra feed nnd tholr mo
thorB' milk until ready to wean, when
they wero put out In a good grazing
Hold.
Tho dams woro well fed and regu
larly worked at lenst eleven montliB
out of tho twelvo, If tho wenthor per
mitted. They kept In good working order,
did good work nil tho year round nnd
four out of flvo raised a thrifty colt
Nover let n colt grow to nny ago
and slza without halter breaking him.
Hundreds of valuahlo young horses
nro much injured in disposition by lot
ting them run until they nro from two
to threo years of ago and then for tho
PIG-EATING HABIT
ONLY IN OLD SOWS
Characteristic Never Laid at
Door of Young Mother Rem
edy Found in Exercise.
It Is a well known fact that tho pig
eating propensity is an nttrlbuto of an
old sow; tho characteristic Is never
laid at tho door of tho young mother.
If not tho old It Is tho maturo bred
sow; she with the second or third lit
ter, nnd It will bo found thnt sho Is
usually of tho slow, sluggish disposi
tion. An argument put forth Is thnt this
Is tho falling of tho domesticated, but
uncivilized hog alono. Undor natural
conditions tho mothor will Bacrlfico
hor own llfo for that of her young, but
the reverso has nevor been heard of.
Why, then, with UiIb fact should wo
bo led to believe wo feed our hogs
too much; that tho euro Ib moro ani
mal food and protein? Why cultivato
a tasto for moat?
Which sow is it that most needs
protein? Is it tho gilt that must grow
both bar own framo and her litter, or
Is It tho maturo sow that has only
her litter?
It Is a known fact thnt on stock
farmB whero ns many as fifty or more
brood sows aro kept they nnd tholr
progeny run aftor tho cattlo.
Tho only feed of thcao sows may bo
corn In tho winter, oithor fresh or In
tho droppings of tho cnttle. In tho
summer corn nnd grass. In this bill
of faro It Is seen that protoln Is con
spicuous by Its absence, yet from
theso farms come no reports of pig
eating sows.
Instead, tho complaints of tho bow
with n tooth for hor own offspring
como from farms where tho sows are
kept In a small 8x10 pen, living a llfo
of Idleness) and suffering from a slug
gish liver, constipation, malnutrition,
anaemia, melancholia and various
other Ills, and curable, all of thorn, ac
cording to experiments In turning
them out to exerclso and scouring for
a morning's breakfast.
However, If exerclso must bo de
nied, the man who must noods keop
his bows In this 8x10 pen can at lenKt
seo that hor bowels aro well exer
cised. A llttlo amount of bran Is a good
thing to add to tho ration. It Is used
for mechanical effects only, so enough
should bo used dnly to keop tho bow
els open, their nctlon vigorous and tho
passages soft.
Watering Work Team.
Water tho work team between meals
ir possible. Tho sweat out lotH of
WRtor these dnya.
to Pasture.
first tlmo cornered In a stall by sov
oral farm hands, which may bo n frol
ic to tho latter but qulto contrary toi
tho former.
A wild, grcon colt Is as strong no u,
bull when thus cornered, a man tries
to throw a nooso over tho torrlfledl
animal's head, ho misses, tho colt,
springs to tho far sldo of tho stall, i
rears and nttompts to break over the!
partition; back ho Ib forced by n fol-j
low with tho handlo of n pitchfork or
soma other equally sorvlccablo wcu-i
pon.
Again thoy try the noose, nnd this,
tlmo successfully. Tho sweating,
plunging young animal Is now drawnj
up to tho partition by threo husky!
farm laborers, a bridlo Is placed on',
hla head, the doors aro opened nndl
with u bound tho colt plunges out
Men nro hanging to tho end of tho
long ropo, nn end of which Is run
through tho bit ;
Tho colt reaches tho end of Its
tether with a Jerk which nearly dislo
cates his Jaw; ho Is brought suddenly1
to a stop, when ono of tho men walks
up to him.
Tho colt backs, tho threo follows at,
tho ond of tho ropo Jerk nnd awlng
on it until tho colt comes to a stand-j
still, with oyes staring nnd tho swentj
running out of overy poro.
Now ho Is forced to movo. Away
ho springs, to bo Jerked back sudden
ly. In tho courso of nn hour tho mom
nnd tho victim nro equally worn out
nnd tho colt, having received his Unit'
lesson, is put back In tho stnblo with,
tho bridlo on nnd tho ropo dragging toi
bo loft In thla wny until another day.i
when tho samo idiotic performance,
will bo repeated.
So much for this kind of haltcr-J
breaking. Thero should really bo no,
kind of hnltor-brcaklng oxcopt tho,
sort thnt takes placo when tho colt l
from throo days to threo weeks old.
AAsvvvw'WVXAAywv
BUCKWHEAT MAKES
GOOD CATTLE FEED
Quick Growing Crop and Straw
Is Good Absorbent for Use
About the Stables.
iy a. j. r.Eaa.)
Thirty years ago farmers woro pro-,
Judlced against buckwheat as a farm
crop. Thoy thought buckwheat a voryl
oxhaustivo crop and thnt It ruined1
tholr soil.
Now nenrly overy farmer In thlB
soctlon grows a fow acres of buck
whoat, and whllo It is a quick-growing',
crop nnd, of courso, removes connld-j
ornblo of tho plant food, It does not,
seem to bo hnrdor on tho boII thun
corn or oats.
Buckwheat will keop, down tho weeds,
and keop tho soil practlcaly froo from
thorn. It Ib nn oxcellont crop with
which to bow grass and clovor on no
count of this, nnd nlso because It ma"
turos quickly and leaves tho young
plants In comploto possession of the
BOll.
As to tho value of tho buckwheat, It
makes n good feed for nil tho stock,
and tho straw Is a good absorbent to
uso about tho Btablo. Tho nutritive
ratio of buckwheat Ib about ono to
seven.
As to Its cultivation. It mnv tin-
sown horo as into as August nnd mni
turo a crop. It only requires nbout C0(
days In which to maturo. An ncld(
phosphato seems to bo tho fertiliser
to use.
Tho West Virginia experiment sta
tion found that ICO pounds of acid,
phosphato per ncro was tho most eco
nomical fertllUor to ubo on buck
wheat. A heavier application did not pay
the extra cost of tho fertilizer In In
creased yield.
Ono buBhel of JnpancBo buckwheat,
or three pecks of tho Silver Hull vari
ety per ncro, Is enough seed to uso.
Tho boII should bo well prepared,,
by plowing, harrowing and rolling, it
Is usually better to plow tho ground,
two or throo weeks boforo seeding.
The crop Is sown hero nt any tlraei
from May until August, with fairly'
good results.
Tho earllor sowings do not usunlly
ylold as many bushels per ncro as the
Into oneB, hut tho seed Is usunlly bols
ter matured and weighs heavlor.
Alfalfa and Sweet Clover.
Whero It Is difficult to obtain a
stand of alfalfa it Is qulto possible
sowing sweet clovor a year or two be-i
fore seeding to alfalfa would provel
advantngeous. Sweet clover will in-'
oculato tho soil and put it Into good
condition for seeding alfalfa.

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