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The North Platte semi-weekly tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, July 11, 1916, Image 6

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THE SEMI-WEEKLV TRIBUNE, NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
eAUCTIOH BLOCK
A ovex,
REX DEACrt t T
lIXU5TMnOH5 4 F PARKER
8YNOP8I8.
Pater Knlr.ht, defontod for political of
Bco In his town, docldos to venturo Now
York In order that tho family fortunes
nlht benont by tho oxpccted rlso of his
charmlnjr daughter, Lorelei. A woll
known crltlo Interviews Lorolol ICnlnht,
now 8tK0 boauty with Bergman'!! Itevuo,
for a njieclal article, Her coln-huntlnB
mother outlines Lorelei's ambitions, but
BIoskoii, the prea agent, later adds his
Information. Lorelol attonds Mllllonulro
Mammon's corfroous entortalnment. Hhe
pieets Morlde, a wealthy dyspeptic. Hob
Wharton comos uninvited. Iorolel dis
covers ft blackmail plot against IlBinmon,
In wluch her brother In Involved. Merklo
and Lorclol havo an auto wreck. The
blackmailers bojtmlrch her good name,
lorelol learns her mother Is an unscru
pulous plotter. Hhe finds In Adoroo Iom
ftrftst a real friend, and finds nob Whar
ton Is likable.
, 2
C A decent young woman In ij
K public life Is forced to leavo her
parents because they have no
8 regard for her reputation. 8ho
H needo monoy and needs It badly.
A rich man offers her ten thou-
S; sanu aoi are. no By inoro aro
8 no strings to the gift-that he $
j. - .... A
K merely wants to be kind. Dare M
S .htaL It? Loralel's dilemma Is t
she take It? Lorelei's dilemma Is
K set forth In Interesting detail in K
W this Installment.
Lorelei finds one cannot llvo long
er with her rascally parents. Merkle,
the banker, has Just offered to a'v0
her ton thousand dollars. They aro
discussing the proposition.
CHAPTER XI Continued.
"Why do you offer mo so much?"
alio askod, curiously.
"Becauso I like you Oh, I mean
like,' not 'lovoi Bocauso I think
you'ro (food and will need monoy to
remain good. You'ro not an ordinary
woman, Miss Knight; you can't llvo aa
ordinary women llvo, now that you'ro
famous. New York won't lot you."
"You'ro very kind and generous
after all that has occurred and after
knowing my reason for being hero."
"My floar child, you didn't choose
ymir family, and as for tho other, tho
fomon of my net mnrry for monoy,
Just as you plan to do. So do -women
averywhoro, for that mattor, nnd many
of thorn mako excollont -wives yes,
fflr boltor than it thoy bad married
poor men. Fow girls ns beautiful as
you in any walk of Ilfo aro nllowed to
(marry for lovo. Trust mo, a woman
Uko you, if Bho lives up to tho obli
gations of wifehood, desorvca hotter
thnn ono who takes n man for love
and then perhaps goes back on her bar-
gain. Will you accept my offor?"
"No. But I thank you."
"Think it over; tlioro 1b no hurry,
ttud remember I want to help." With
no of his Infrequent, wan smiles, ho
extended his hand, nnd Lorelei granped
tt warmly, though hor face was set
Mid strained.
Sho was far too woll balanced for
fcnsty resolutions, but hor mind, ouco
eaado up, wan soldoin ehanged. It dis
tressed her grlovously to lenvo her
people, but at tho thought of remain
Ing longer with thorn every instinct
rebelled. Hor own kin, urged by
greed, bad not hesitated to cheapen
nnd rlogrado her; their last offonso.
coupled with all that had gono boforo,
wbb nioro Ulan could bo borno. Yet
alio was less resentful than sad, for it
seemed to her that this was tho be
ginning of the end. First tho father
bad boon crippled, then tho moral fiber
Of the whole family had disintegrated
intil tho mother had become u harpy,
tbo brother n acamp, and sho, Lorolol,
a shameless hunter of men. Now tho
borno tic, that last bond of respect-
Ability, was to bo broken
1 Hor first Impulse, was to tako up her
abode with Adorco Domorcst, but a
little thought Allowed tho inadvlsnblllty
of that. In hor doubt Bho appealed to
Lllng, broaching tho subject as tho two
girls woro dresslug after U10 perform
mice.
When Lorelei had mado known her
decision, tho other girl nodded her ap
proval.
"I don't blamo you n bit; a girl needs
liberty. I havo flvo rooms, and a Jap
to tako caro of them; they'ro lovoly."
"I can't nfford an expensive placo."
"Woll, there aro some three-room
flats In tho rear, and I havo ltl der
tie Moore kept one, hut she's gono on
tbo road. It's all furnished, too, If
It hasn't been sublot you can get it at
your own terms. Tho building Is re
spectable, too; it's us proper as tho
Ritz. I'm dining alono tonight. Como
to dinner with mo nnd" we'll And out
nil about It."
Lorolel would have preferred a dif
ferent location, not particularly desir
ing to be near Lllns; but there was no
time lu which to look about, itud tho
' necessity that faced her mado any
HBsistanco welcome, without inoro
discussions she agreed, nud tho two
' girls rodo uptown together.
Suo Elegancla, whore Lllaa lived,
. was u salnfully new, overolabornto
Biiuuiug, witn a uoiiuc front nnd n
Gotham rear half its windows paBted
With rental slgnB, Six potted palms,
, Turkish rug and n Jaundiced Jamni
ran elevator boy gnvo an air of wo!
come to tho oruuto tnarhte entrance
Mil,
Ltlat- fitted a key to the first doof on
or zew york: ure
tho rli;lit ns tlicy went In, explaining,
"I'm on tho ground floor, unci And it
very convenient."
"TIiIh plnco is too grand for me," Lo
relei objected.
"Oh, offer your own price for Ger
tie's lint if you like it. They're crazy
for tenants. It's cheaper than hotelB
If you want to save money."
Lorelei was Biirpriscd to find her
friend's quarters not only richly hut
lavishly furnished. Tho decorations
were harmonious and bespoke a reck
less disregard of cost. A fluffy Jap
anese spaniel with protruding eyes and
distorted visage capered deliriously at
Its mistress feet.
Hut the objects that Intrigued tho
visitor most strongly were several
paintings. They were of n kind sho
had seldom seen, and in tho afternoon
light one stood out with particularly
startling effect. It was a dusky land
scape; there- was n stream, a meadow
edge, trees Just growing black against
a dying sunset, a herd of cattle com-
-
n Tut ,f ,tho we!t B?f01
tin,. Tnro1.il nimanil atnrlnir
Before this plc-
wlth wldo
7 ,
oycH of wonder.
Lilas flung her hat carelessly into a
chair, lit a cigarette from a Tiffany
humidor, then turned with tho spaniel
In her arms nnd, beholding her guest
with rapt, upturned face, remarked,
with a laugh:
"Looks llko tho real thing, doesn't it?"
"Oh It's wonderful so clean and
cool nnd quiet! I've seen cattle in Valo
that looked just like those, -when I
went barefoot In tho grass."
"Somo Dutchman painted it his
name's on tho corner. He's dead now,
I believe. It used to hang in bouio
museum I forget where. I llko pic
tures of women best, but " Sho
shrugged nnd left tho sentence unfin
ished. "Thore's n dandy in my bed
room, although It didn't cost half as
much as that barnyard thing. Tho
frnmo's a foot wide nnd covered with
solid gold."
"I had no Idea you lived llko this."
Lorolel peered through a pair of
French doors and into n perfectly ap
pointed library, with a masslvo mahog
any table, deep lounging chairs, a writ
ing desk, nnd a dome-crowned read
lug lamp.
"My study," LUas laughed, shortly.
"That'B whore I lmprovo my mind
not. Tho hooks aro deadly. Now como;
mtchy Koo must havo dinner ready.
Ills namo isn't Uitchy Koo, but it
sounds llko it, and he's 'the cutest
little thing; got the cutest llttlo
swing.' " Sho moved down tho hall,
humming tho chorus of tho senseless
popular song from -which Bho had
quoted.
Everywhere -was tho aamo evldenco
of good tasto in decoration nnd luxury
of equipment, but a suspicion bad en
tered Lorelei's mind, nnd sho avoided
comment. Uitchy ICoo was cook, but
ler and house-boy, and in view of Miss
Lynn's disorderly habits it was evi
dent that ho had all ho could do to
keep tho placo presentable. Ills mla
trcsB ato without nppotlto and in a
hypercritical mood that took no ac
count of tho wasteful nttcnipts to
plcaso hor. Quito regardless of tho pa
tient llttlo Jap, aho found fault with
him savagely, bo that Lorelei was
often painfully embarrassed.
"So you llko my homo, do you?" bjio
queried, after a time.
"I'vo nover seen ono bo beautiful."
Lilas nodded. "Hltchy BlocpB out,
and that leaves mo tho -wholo place.
Jurvls furnished it, oven to tho books,
and I'm Btudying to bo n lady." Again
sho laughed mockingly. "I make a
bluff at reading, but bo long ns I talk
nbout Napoleon ho never thinks to
question mo. I know that French gluk
backward."
"I wish I had n hobby something to
interest mo, something to live for,"
said Lorelei, lamely.
"Yes. It gives you something to
think nbout when you'ro alone. It
helps you to stand things." For tho
lirst tlmo Lilas showed a trace of feel
ing in hor voice; sho dropped her chin
into hor palm and, leaning upon the
table, stared as If nt a vision. nor
dark eyes wero somber, her brows
were lowered and drawn together.
Tho slipshod Informality of tho meal,
tho constant faultfinding of tho host
ess, inn do It something of a trial. Lore
lei was not sorry when It wns over
and Lilas took her to look at tho va
cant Hat.
Miss Moore's apartment offered a
wldo contrast to tho ono they had Just
quitted, being very small and very
modestly furnished; but It was on tho
second floor, convenient to both eleva
tor and stairway, it boasted a piano,
nnd tho Buporlntendout allowed his
prospective tenant to namo her own
terms. Sho descended with relief, feel
ing that sho had mado not n bad bar
gain. Sho stated, as sho sank Into Lllns'
big library chnlr, "I feel qulto inde
pendent at last. Tho rent is ridicu
lous, and I can do my own cooking."
"Don't mako a fool of yourself. You
can do as well na I'vo dono,
You have
tho lookB."
"But I'm not engaged to a multimil
lionaire." "It neoms queor, when I think of It,"
Lilas mtificd. "Jnrvia is ono of the
richest men lu New York, and he mado
his money out of tho steel business
tho business into which I was born.
Have you over been through a mill?"
"No."
"It's wonderful, terrible. I can smell
the hot slag, the scorching cinders, the
smoke, to this day. Some nights I
wake up screaming, it's so vivid. I
see the glare of tho furnaces, the belch
ing flames, the showers of sparks from
tho converters, the streams of white-
hot metal, and thoy seem to pour over
me. I havo the same dream always;
I've had it ever hIiico tho night after
my father was killed."
"You told mo he was killed in a steel
mill."
"Yes, before my eyes. I saw It"
Lilas shuddered. "I was a llttlo girl
then, but I've never forgotten. Wo
were poor, dreadfully poor, like all tho
Jews Oh, yes; didn't you know I'm
a Jew?"
"Then 'Lilas Lynn'--?"
"Stage name. Ifn really Lily Lo
vlnski. We were Polish. I was
dragged up, along with tho other work
men's children, in the soot and grlmo
of tho Pennsylvania mills. "Hell must
bo like those mills it couldn't bo
worse."
Lorelei had never heard her room
mato speak with such feeling nor in
such a Btraln. But Lilas seemed qulto
unconscious of her little burst of elo
quence. Sho was seated, leaning for
ward now with hands locked between
her knees; her eyes were brilliant in
tho gathering dusk. Iler memories
seemed to nffect her with n kind of
horror, yet to hold her fascinated and
to demand expression,
"I was an Imaginative kid," sho
continued. "It's a trait of our people,
llko well, llko their dishrust of au
thority and their fear of law. Father
worked n tho Bessemer plant, llko any
hunkie, nnd tho women: used to bring
tho meu'B lunches to them. Mother
wasn't strong, and that duty fell to mo.
"It wob ono of tho biggest mills In
Pennsylvania, and Its tonnngo was
always heavy because the superin
tendent was n Blnvo driver. Ho was
one of thoao men who arc born without
a soul or feelings, and ho had no In
tcrcst In anything except rails and
plates.
"Ono day I took my stand Just out
nlde U10 Bessemer plant. It was a big
shell of steel girders and corrugated
iron, nnd tho sido where wo were was
open. Fnthcr snw me nnd waved his
hand ho nlways waved at me then
I saw tho superintendent coming
through a big, square-faced man
whom overybody feared. Wherever
he went the hunklcs danced; he could
put lifo Into a dead man's limbs, that
man. It wbb becauso of their great
fear of him and his furious urging tlint
something happened."
Lilas had begun her recital Blowly,
without npparent object, but once into
it sho seemed unablo to stop; and now,
although her words camo haltingly, it
wbb plain that sho had worked herself
Into n sort of hysteria In which sho
gnvo llttlo heed to her hearer. It was
characteristic of her that she could
bo oxclto herself by tho power of vis
ualization ns to bo completely trans
ported. "Something went wrong overhead;
anyhow, tho converter dumped too
soon. Men wore working directly un-
"I Was nn Imaginative Kid," Sho Con
tlnued.
derncath, father among tho rest 1
saw him go down under n Btream of
liquid Bteel "
Lorelei's horrified oxclamatlon went
unnoticed; Lilas' volco wns shrill.
"Yes. He was blotted out, right bo
foro my eyes, in an instant. In tho
tlmo It takes to snap your finger, he
nnd tho others were gono, changed
into smoke, into nbsoluto nothingness
There was 110 iusurnnco, and nobody
took tho blame. Another Jew family,
n few more whlowed aud fatherless
Author of
'"The Iron Trail
"The Spoilers"
The Silver Horde" Etc.
Ctftrithl, S) lltrfir tl Brtlktrt
forclgners, among that army, meant
nothing. I'vo never forgotten that day,
nor tho figure of that shouting, swear
ing man who camo through tho Bes
semer mill crying for more speed,
more speed, more speed.
"I supposo I was too llttlo to mako
any foolish vows of vengeance, for I
was only a ragged mito of a child
among a horde of slaves, but when I
grew older I often dreamed of having
thnt man In my power, nnd making
him suffer. Who would who could
havo imagined that I'd ever bo living
on money wrung from tho labor of men
llko my father, and bo In n position to
meet thnt man on an equal footing? I
nover did not in my wildest moments,
and yet hero I am nnd tho dny of
reckoning gets closor nil tho tlmo."
Sho ended with an abruptness that
evidenced her agitation. Rising, sho
Jerked n beaded chain that depended
from tho center lamp, and the room
was flooded with mellow light; then
she drew out tho table drawer at her
guest's elbow, and with shaking hands
selected n small box from tho confu
sion within. Lorelei recoiled nt the
sight of a revolver hidden among tho
disorder.
"Goodness! I hope It isn't loaded,"
the latter exclaimed. "Your story gives
mo the creeps and thnt thing seems
to fit In."
"It's loaded, all right I keep it for
protection. I don't know why I told
you all this," she half apologized to
Lorelei. "It has upset me, as it al
ways does."
"How did you ever grow up and
educate yourself?"
"I hardly know. I filled out when I
began to get something to eat, and I
developed a good figure. Finally I got
to bo n model. I was quick to learn,
and when rich dames came in I
watched them. I became good-looking,
too, although not bo pretty aB I am
now, for I couldn't put tho tlmo or
monoy on it. Then I came to New
York. Tho rest Isn't n pretty story."
Miss Lynn made this declaration
calmly as sho busied herself with the
glass hor servant had fetched. Sho
dissolved n portion of the powder she
had taken from tho box in the spoon,
then carefully transferred tho liquid
Into tho cap of a pearl-and-gold foun
tain pen. Inserting tho open end of
tho receptacle into first one, then the
other nostril, she inhaled the con
tents.
"What aro you doing?" asked Loro
lel curiously.
"Something to quiet my nerves. I
wonder why I told you all this?" She
eyed her guest speculatively, then
shrugged. "Well, since we're to bo
neighbors, we must bo friends, and
there's no harm done. Now that Jar
vis and I nro engaged, he's awfully
particular about tho company I keep,
but ho likes you. How different they
act when they're in earnest! He oven
wnnts mo to quit work now, but I
like the excitement it's better than
wnltlng." She glnnccd nt her wrist-
watch and drew herself together. "Our
tlmo Is up, dear; wo must get back
to tho show-shop."
CHAPTER XII.
Lorelei exploded hor bomb nt break
fast Sunday morning, nnd the effect
wns nil sho hnd dreaded. Fortunately
Jim had gone out Tho girl's humilia
tion nt Morklo's disclosure and her
merciless accusations left llttlo to be
said In self-defense. Of course, the
usual tears followed, likewise repe
titions of tho time-worn plea that It
had all been dono for Lorelei's own
good nnd had been prompted by unself
ish lovo for her.
"I'm beginning to doubt that," Lore
lei eald, slowly. "I think you nil look
upon mo ns a piece of property to do
with as you please. Tcrhnps I'm dls
loyal nnd ungrateful, but I can't help
it And I can't forgive you yet When
can I'll como homo again, but It's
Impossible for mo to live here now,
feeling as I do. I want to lovo you
so I'm going to run away."
Tragically, through her tears, Mrs,
Knight inquired: "What will becomo
of us? Wo can't llvo Jim nover does
anything for us."
In Peter's wntcry staro wns nbjoct
fright. "Lorelei wouldn't let us suf
for." ho ventured, tremulously. "I'm
sick. I mny dlo nny time, so tho doc
tor snys." no wns Indeed n changed
mnn; thnt easy good-humor that had
been IiIb most Hkablo trait had been
lost in habitual peevishness.
"I'll keep tho Iioubo running ns be
fore," his daughter assured him, "and
I'll mnnngo to got nloug on what's left
But you mustn't bo quite so cxtrava
gant, that's nil. I sha'n't be and you
wouldn't force mo to do anything I'd
regret, I'm sure." She choked down
hor pity nt the sight of tho invalid's
pasty face and flabby form, then
turned to tho window. Her emotion
prevented her from observing Uie relief
that greeted her words.
Tho moment was painful; Lorelei's
eyes wero dim, and sho hardly saw tho
dreary prospect of tiro escapes, of
whitewashed brlcic, of bare, gaping
back yards overhung with clotheslines
like nerves exposed in tho process of
dissection.
"Yes, things will go on Just tho
Bame," ebe repeated, then clenched
her hands nnd burst forth miserably:
Oh, I know how bndly you need
money! I know what the doctor says,
and I'll get It somehow. It seems to
me I'd pay any price Just to see dad
walking around again and to know
that yoa were both provided for.
Money, money! You both worship it,
and I'm gettiug so I can't think of
anything else. Nothing clso seems
worth while."
Two hours later a dray called for
her trunks and took them nocoss town.
Tho Elegancln apartments looked
down on her with chill disapproval ns
sho entered; the elevator man stared
at her with black, hostilo eyes until
sho had made herself known; and
oven the superintendent In n less pre
tentious structuro thnn the Elegancla
he would have been the Janitor now
that "No. 0" was rented, did not extend
even a perfunctory welcome ns he de
livered the keys. On the contrary, he
"Money,
Money!
ship
Wor-
made known tho cxclualvo character
of the houso In such n pointed manner
as to offend her.
LUas was out, she learned, which
probably meant that she was still
asleep. Lorelei ascended to her new
home In low spirits. Now that she
saw tho place In Btrong duyllght, sho
wns vaguely disappointed. She was
very lonely, very friendless, and very
much discouraged. Then sho noticed
the telephone and sprang toward it
Adoreo was at home; hor volco an
swered cheerily, and her interruptions
of amazement and delight caused Lore
lei's message to spin Itself out unduly.
Without waiting for nn Invitation
Adoreo cried:
"Let mo como nnd help. Pleasol
We'll use both the poodles for mops,
and I'll bo there in ten mlnutos. . . .
You're a perfect dear to say yes, for
I know you want to do It all yourself."
"Come now quickly. I'm scared "
Lorelei bogged, in tearful tones.
"I'll drlvo right up In my chariot of
tlame; I was going out, and it's wait
ing while I kalsomlno my face. Arc
you nuro everything is good and dirty?
Goody! We'll do it ourselves. Good
by." Sido by sido the girls worked; thoy
forgot their luncheon, then sent tho
sad-faced footman in search of n deli
catessen store, and ato ravenously with
a newspaper for tablecloth. By eve
ning the placo found Itself for once in
its lifo clean and orderly, and tho two
occupants dressed and went out to a
nearby hotel for dinner. Returning,
they put the flnal touches to their task.
When Adoree loft, lato that night,
she kissed hor friend, saying:
"Thank you for tho loveliest Sunday
I over had. It was splendid, and I'll
come again tomorrow."
The theatrical profession is full of
wompn whose lives nro flawMoss; hen'co
it had not been difficult for Lorolel to
build up a reputation that insured ro
spect, although her connection with n
Bergman show mndo tho task more dif
ficult than it would otherwise havo
been. During the two years of her
stage experlenco no scandal had at
tached to her name, and sho had there
foro begun to feel secure. In that pe
riod Bite had met many men of the
usual types that are attracted by foot
light favorites, and they had pressed
attentions upon her, but bo long ns she
hnd been recognized ns the Lady Un
obtalnablo they ha1 not forced their
uuwelcomo advances. Now, however,
that a scurrilous newspaper story had
associated her namo "with flint of a
wealthy man, sho began to note a
change. Bergman's advances had beeu
only another disquieting symptom of
what Bho had to expect an indication
of tho now color her reputntion had ns
sumcd. Nobel Bergmnn's commercial caution
steered him wldo of tho moral women
In IiIb employ, but the other kind, nnd
especially the Innocent or tho Inexperi
enced, had cause to know and to fear
him. In appearanco ho was ylender
and foppish; ho nffected a pronounced
waist lino In his coats, his eyes wero
largo and dark aud brilliant, IiIb mouth
was sensual, no never raised his
volco, ho nover appeared to see plain
women; such girls as accepted his at
tentions wero sure of advancement,
but paid for it In other, ways.
On Monday evening Mr. Slofson, tho
press agent, thrust his head through
the dressing-room door nnd announced
to Lorelei:
You Both
It."
"Bergman says Mrs. Thompson-.Del-
lairo is giving n box party, and she
told him to fetch you around for sup
por. Sho owns n piece of this show,
and tho theater belongs to tho estate,
so. you'll Just have to go."
"Mercy! Mrs. Thompson-Bollalre, the
college boy's giddy godmother," Lilas
mocked. "I suppose she's out slum
ming, with her kindergarten clflss."
Slosson frowned at this levity. "Will
you go?" ho Inquired. "Yes or no?"
"Um-m I'll have to say 'yes,' It
seems."
"Good. I'll 'jihono Bergman."
When the press agent had gono Lilas
regarded hor companion with open
compassion. "Geo! But you'ro going
to havo a grand time. That bunch
think'B It's smart to bo seen with show
people, and of courso they'll dance all
night"
"And I did so want to go straight
back to my new homo." When Bhe
Joined her employer after tho show sho
was in no very ngreeable frame of
mind.
Mrs. Thonipson-Bellnfro was a ver-
mlllon-halrcd widow with a chost llko
a blacksmith, who had become famous
for her jewels nnd her soclnl eccen
tricities. Sho nnd her party were es
tablished nt ono of the uptown "Trot
tolres," when Nobel Bergman and Lo
relei arrived. Three examples of
blushing boyhood devoted themselves
to n languid blondo girl of thirty-five,
nnd the hostess herself was dancing
with another tender youth, but she
enmo forward, panting.
'So good of you to como, dear," she
cried. "This is Miss Wyeth, and these
are my boys, Mr. " Sho spoke four
meaningless names, nnd four mean
ingless smiles responded; four wet
combed heads were bowed. She turned
to her blonde companion, saying "She
1b pretty, Isn't sho, Alico?"
"Very," Alico agreed, -without remov
ing hor eyes from tho youth nt her left.
Bergmnn invited Lorelei to finish the
dnncc; then he inquired, "Whnt do you
think of her?"
"Her hair fascinntcs mo; sho looks
ns If she hnd just burst out of n thicket
of henna leaves." Bergman laughed,
silently. "But why did Bho Invito mo?"
"I told her to."
"You?"
"I know you'd refuse if I askod
you."
"So? Then I'm renlly your gue3t in
stead of hers."
"We'll leavo whenever you say."
Throughout the rest of tho danco
Lorelei was silent offended nt Berg
man's deception nnd uncomfortable at
her. own situntion; but the hostess had
ordered a supper of the unsatisfactory
kind usual in such places; llttlo ns she
liked the prospect, sho could not leave
nt once.
The meal was Interrupted regularly
each time the music ployed, for danc
ing waB more than a fad In this set
it was a serious business with which
nothing was allowed to interfere.
There was considerable drinking,
Bergmnn, who devoted himself nssidu
oualy to his employee, showing more
effect from It thnn the others. As tho
night woro on ho became more nnd
more offensive; he grew coarse in a
sly, tentative manner, ns if feeling bks
ground. He changed tho manner of
his dancing, also, until Lorelei could
no longer tolcrato him.
"Getting tired, my dear?" he queried,
when sho declined to Join tho whirling
throng.
"Yes. I wnnt to go."
"Still on Amstcrdnm nvenuo?"
"No, I'm living nlonc now."
Bergman started, his eyes bright
ened. "Ah! Then you've come to your
senses finally. Merklo flxed it eh? I
can do more for you thnn Merklo can."
"Merkle?" Sho eyed him coolly.
"Oh, play your game with strangers,
but don't put mo off. Weren't you
caught with him at tho Chateau? Well,
then"
"Yon needn't finish. I'm going home
now."
Ho laid n detninlng hand upon her
arm. "You never learned thnt speech
in ono of my shows," ho snld, "and
you're not going to say good night to
mo. Ijiiderstand?" He grinned at her
with disgusting confidence," and sho
flung off his touchy Tho returning
dancers offered n welcomo diversion.
Lorelei dreaded nn open clash with
the manager, knowing thnt the plnce,
tho hour nnd tho conditions were ill
suited to n Bcene. Sho had learned
to smllo nnd to consider swiftly, to
cross tho thin ico of nn cmbnrrassing
situation with light steps. Quickly
sho turned to Mrs. Thompson-Bellaire,
who was bowing effusively to a new
comer. "My word! What ia Bob Wharton
doing hero?" exclaimed the widow.
"Bob Wharton? Whero?" Miss Wy
eth's languor vanished electrically; sho
wrenched her nttontlon from the wiro-
hnired fraternity man at her Bide. Lo
relei felt a senso of great thanksgiving.
Mrs. Thompson-Bellalro beckoned,
nnd Wharton enmo forward, his eyes
fixed gloomily upon Lorelei.
"You raBcal! So tills is how you
waste your evenings. I nm surprised,
but, now that wo'vo caught you, won't
you join us?"
Wharton glanced at tho four pawns
and hesitated. "It's long past ulno;
I'm afraid the boys will bo Into for
Bchool."
(TO 1313 CONTINUED.)
Humanity's Falling.
"Somo men," oaid Uncle Kben,
" 'poarB to onjoy buyin' gold bricks fob
do Baku of sliowin' bow much monoy
dey has to waste,"
Will Bob Wharton rescue her $
j$J from Bergman only to forco his
vi own drunken attentions on the
W unfortunate Lorelei? hi

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