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The frontier. (O'Neill City, Holt County, Neb.) 1880-1965, June 14, 1917, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010270509/1917-06-14/ed-1/seq-7/

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[NATURE
Did not make men in
standard sizes, and the
clothes we wear, who ex
pects to get a perfect fit in a
standard size garment, is
usually expecting the im
possible. Your clothier tells
you that you are a standard
38, and then he tries to fit
you with a standard 36 coat.
But take the waist-length
measure of fifty men who
are called standard 36, you’ll
find that not ten of them
measure exactly the same.
A Royal suit is built to 17 of
your body measures. It
must fit or we will not let
you keep it; take your choice
and we will wish you luck.
Do not wait until July 4th to
order your Royal Tailored
Suit.
$20.00 ROYAL TAILORED $16
$25.00 ROYAL TAILORED (M'J
Suits —....™
PAY CASH and PAY LESS
2 CANS OF 25c PEAS 0 Q a
for .
2 CANS OF 15c PEAS 1Qn
for .
1—25c CAN OF CORN 1A a
for .*
1 LARGE 25c CAN OF 1 Qa
Tomatoes for.I Ul»
Small Profits andQuickSales
Our Motto.
24 POUNDS OF VICTOR Q7a
Chick Food for .** ■ «
10 POUNDS OF 10c RICE 69c
CALIFORNIA CABBAGE fjCp
per pound.UUw
1 POUND OF RED CROSS 9R«
Chewing Tobacco .wvw
2 POUNDS OF 28c A POUND 9%
Cookies for .wfcw
Why can we sell so cheap? Be
cause we have eliminated the cost of
delivery and bad accounts.
4 LARGE CANS OF 25c CALlFOR
nia Fruit—2 cans of Pears, 1 can
of Peaches, 1 can of Apricots, R C a
4 cans for.UUU
14 BARS OF CRYSTAL /JOa
White Soap for.
ARMOUR HAMS, AT OLD- „
time prices.:.ttw
BUY ICE CREAM HERE
AT ZERO PRICES.
WE SELL FOR LESS
85c WORK SHIRTS 65c
$1.50 DRESS SHIRTS 87c
$2.50 DRESS SHIRTS 1.49
$2.75 BROWN UNION ALLS -j 00
$2.00 VERY BEST BLUE 1 90
Overalls for.I i*l*l
$2.50 MEN’S UNION SUITS 1 ^0
$2.00 MEN’S UNION SUITS 1 1 Q
for .• • • J
$1.50 MEN’S UNION SUITS g0Q
(“57” STEPS)
Up Where the
Prices Are Down
John Mevin
AMERICA’S PART IN THE WAR
(Continued from page four.)
pitalities upon Colonel Roosevelt. He
gave the tip to every German states
man and business man that it was
obviously in the interest of Germany
to associate herself as intimately as
\ possible with “The Land of Unlimited
Possibilities.”
Down with a clash has now come
this scientifically planned German
sft’ me. For from having paved the
w; •!' for the harnessing of America’s
. incalculable resources to the Hun war
chariot, German determination to run
amuck in the civilized world has
hitched them to the chariot of Ger
many’s enemies. Today “the land of
unlimited possibilities” is at war with
Germany and “everything we are,
everything we have,” Mr. Wilson’s
undying words, is to be mobilized for
the overthrow and destruction of Ho
henzollernism and all its works.
America’s final determination tc
make war on Germany does not take
the latter by surprise. For two years
Berlin has looked upon the Unitec
States of America as all but a de
clared enemy. The Washington au
thorities have been formally notified
to that effect on more than one occa
sion. The German people have been
steadily led to believe that if America
joned their enemies Germany’s actual
plight could not be much aggrieved.
They believed, indeed, that they can
do America far more damage than the
other way about. ' “Are not the
Yankees already furnishing our ene
mies with every sinew of war that they
need—money, food and ammunitions?”
the Germans have said to themselves.
“They have no army. The allies do
not need their navy. Let them 'come
in’ if they want to. They can do no
harm."
At the end of 1916, when the issue
of unrestricted U boat piracy hung in
the balance Hindenburg and Luden
rodff reviewed the “American danger”
from top to bottom. They weighed
every possible contingency—or im
agined that they had. They came to
the conclusion that America could
throw into the scales no weight which
need give Germany serious alarm.
“To hell with America!” was the de
cision they came to. That is the
spirit in which all Germany pretends
at this moment to regard war with
the republic.
But I know Germans, plenty of
them, who are not saying “To hell
with America!” The Morahts may
banish our military establishment into
the realm of insignificance. The
Reventlows may snap their strafing in
the face of the American navy. The
Tirpitzes may imagine that because
U-boats stole into the north Atlantic
waters adjacent to the United States
coast last year and sank half a dozen
allied ships they can also imperil the
security of America itself.
But I am certain that through their
card-index minds today ceratin im
mutable facts such as these are rever
berting—that America produced last
year 23,500,000 tons of steel and 29,
900,0000 tons of pig-iron; that she
mined 694,000 tons of copper in 1915’,
that the 1916 cotton crop was 11,000,
000 bales; that her oil wells produced
11,162,000,000 gallons of petroleum;
that her farms yielded 1,011,000,000
bushels pf wheat and 3,54,535,000
bushels of maize; that she raises
more than 1,000,000,000 pounds ster
ling worth of farm animals; that in a
thousand different directions her popu
lation of 101,882,000 people represent
and control national wealth aggre
gating 37,500 millions of pounds—
verily, “The Land of Unlimited Pos
sibilities.”
What the Ballins and the Gwinners
and the Rathenaus are saying to them
selves this mournful week-end, in
other words, is this: “The allies may
be approaching the end of their
economic tether as fast as, or possiby
faster than, Germany >is. But if there
was any doubt that they could stand
the strain indefinitely, the yoking to
their cause of the illimitable resources
of the United States of America
banishes that doubt to the sphere of
impossibility.”
I peer into the future even further.
I envisage an allied Europe drained to
exhaustion of its man power. And
then I conjure up the spectacle of the
millions of fighting men whom
America is capable of producing, and
will cheerfully produce, if and as soon
as the moment arrives when only the
tapping of l^er vast human reservior
can guarantee for the cause of freedom
that victory without which my
country too—I beg Englishmen to be
lieve—will not now sheathe its mighty
sword.—F. W. Wile in London Dis
patch.
Red and Yellow.
Major Anderson of Fort Sumter
fame was years ahead of the cubist.
The latter’s contention that all sit
uations are reflected in colors, is a
tardy one.
“The nation has turned red,” said
Major Anderson, after surrendering
the flag to Wigfall.
Indeed, red became the national
color scheme and remained such for
four years.
Again has an extraordinary situa
tion brought out the pigments.
Our national color scheme has be
come red and yellow.
Perhaps not all people can see it.
The sense of color varies with dif
ferent eyes, just as some ears cannot'
-- .
I asus
No. 10209
French Draft Stallion, weight about 1500, black,
at my barn in O’Neill.
TERMS—$10.00 to insure colt to stand and suck,
or $15.00 by the eason, money in advance.
ZIMMIE
Spanish Ja( c at same place and terms. Care
will be taken to prevent accidents but will not be
responsible should any occur.
E. F. ROBERTS
IsHOLSUM Bread
Popular In Ibis Town ?
J^Just Ask Our
|i ^Delivery Boy.
He knows.
He’s the “go-between” this store and our
customers. In fact, he’s a “living encyclopedia”
of our customers’ likes and dislikes.
He’ll tell you there never was a more popular
bread sold in this town than
Uflf Mffftf Ihe Bread of
flliuDUr'l Certified Cleanliness
Made in a light, airy bakery with scarcely a touch of
human hands, surrounded by every sanitary precaution
that the science of bread making can suggest.
The best of everything feoes into HOLSUM. And then HOLSUM
goes into germ-proof, dust-proof wrappers that protect it from the
time it leaves our bakery untilit reaches your table.
Our special process gives HOLSUM that sweet, nutty
wheat berry flavor which ydu so enjoy in good bread.
Made Clean, Sold Clean, Delivered Clean
Ask for HOIiSUM by Name
For Sola by
D. Sta.rvi\0Lrd, O’Neill.
hear intensely shrill sounds or dull
sounds that are perceived by others.
But gradually, through the happen
ings of every day, the optic nerves are
becoming more and more excited by
vibrations of the light-bearing ether
and the two colors indigenous to na
tional peril intensify—red and yellow.
Behold the red!
Yesterday a prominent New York
broker committed suicide because age
barred him from fighting for his
country.
A Chicago woman brought her five
sons to a recruiting office and saw ■
them through.
A Pittsburgh girl, left a legacy of
$62,000, turned it all into loan bonds
and kept her job at a knitting mill.
A negro barber, made free by Lin
coln’s emancipation proclamation, gave
the savings of his lifetime to the war
fund.
A Denver millionaire pulled down
his roll-top on a $100,000 job to go
trooping as a sargeant in the volunteer
cavalry.
And now the yellow:
Men who long since applied for
citizenship papers demand of the
county clerk that their listed ages be
changed to safely carry them over the
age limit of draft. '
Dozens of young men were stopped
at the border; headed for “somewhere
in Canada.”
Cults and isms, with mistaken
notions of citizenship, are passing
literature urging people to refrain
from subscribing to the war loan.
Young men in Philadelphia are seek
ing to join the society of friends which
would enable them to deny services on
the grounds of conscientious ob
jections.
A fine spectacle, isn’t it?—this red
and yellow.
Yet, some study affords real hope.
Orange has never been the color of
victory.
Alexander’s banners were bordered
with orange.
It was the predominant color in the
banners of the Crusaders.
Coming mere closely to our own
time, General Grant had a fondness
for orange; his saber trappings were
of orange and there is a fanciful tale
that he kept an orange guidon close by
his side the last days of the wilderness
fight and on the Po river.
Perhaps—who knows?—we must
mix our red with yellow to be viril and
strong—and victorious.—Buffalo Even
ing News.
Mrs. Wm. Daley, of Lincoln, is
visiting relatives in the city.
Patriotic League of Nebraska S
Patriotic League of Nebraska, Omaha, Neb.:
I subscribe to the principles of the Patriotic League of [
Nebraska, and desire to be enrolled as a member:
t Signed . ______ I ^
l Town-- County_ jj
^ CUT THIS OUT, SIGN AND MAIL. |
ORANGE
A Cold Refreshing Pure
I. Fruit Drink
I Orange JooJ is one of Nature’s best offerings. ||
It is made from fresh ripe oranges, sweetened |i
with pure cane sugar to give it just the IB
right blend.
I When hot and thirsty you will find it most II
delightful and satisfying. *
Sc at all drink stands
Less by the case
“If you like Orange*, you’ll like Orange JooJ”
O’Neill BotHind fn
-AT
O’Neill Nebraska I
There will be no charge for anything in the
way of sports. |||
Patriotic Speaking
Sports of All Kinds
shvidce cmMTcT
The Committee plans on making this the big
gest celebration ever held in this section and
they will royally entertain you. Program later.

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