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The frontier. (O'Neill City, Holt County, Neb.) 1880-1965, August 20, 1931, Image 7

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Out Our Way
By Williams
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1911 BY HtA SCHVICC. WC-1,
EXPERT TELLS HOW TO KEEP
CELLAR DRY THROUGHOUT YEAR
By NEA Service
Washington — Damp and musty
basements are the result of faulty
wall or floor construction, clogged
drains or improper back filling and
grading around the walls, say ex
perts of the United States bureau of
standards. In some cases remedying
thfs situation in the home is quite
a job.
CHECK
water
l DRAINAGE
I SYSTEM
[ FOR LEAKS
In checking for the cause of wa
ter in the basement, first see if the
eaves, gutters and downspouts are
carrying off the water from the
roof in a satisfactory manner. The
downspouts should lead in to a
storm sewer, dry well, open water
course or some other suitable out
let.
If this situation does not exist,
a good way to keep water from the
basement walls is to set up a .board
underneath the downspout to direct
the water away from the sides of
the house.
Another remedy for this is to
grade against the basement walls.
This grading should extend at a
considerable slope from 8 to 10 feet
from the walls. The ground should
be planted with grass or sodded.
Still another method is to run
a concrete pavement around the
house from two to three feet wide.
This prevents water gathering close
to the cellar walls and slowly seep
ing in.
Tiling Often Helps
In low, damp places, where there
is a large amount af water in the
subsoil, a draintile system is some
times installed around the footings
to carry the water away before It
can find its way into the basement.
5Ovdep grading prevents
•• MOIST BASEMENTS ■
To lay the tile, dig a trench ad
joining and to a depth of a few
inches below the level of the bot
tom of the cellar floor but not be
low the footing level,” Vincent B.
Phelan of the United States
bureau of standards advises.
"The tile should be at least four
inches in diameter and should be
laid so that the grade of fall will
be smooth and as sharp as possible i
to avoid settlement of mud within
the pipe. Cracks between the joints
should be covered to prevent against
sediment running into pipe. The
pipe should be connected to an out
let similar to those recommended
for the downspouts.”
Waterproofing a wall is another
way to keep water out of the base
ment. Of course, the best place to
apply the waterproofing material is
on the outside of the wall. This
prevents moisture from entering
the wrall at all.
Waterproof Coating
Some of the various coatings ap
plied are cement plaster, for homes
where ground-water conditions are
not especially bad and dampness is
only to be guarded against, and a
bituminous coating, where more
than mere dampness exists. The
latter material may consist of a
simple coating of coal-tar pitch or
asphalt, or may be a build-up cover
ing of alternate layers of the bi
tuminous material and tar paper.
Frost and running w’ater has a
tendency to crack cellar walls and
floors. Water seeping through the
cracks wears them larger until it
runs through freely.
[waterproof
THE CELLAR WALL
“If the walls are in good condi
tion otherwise, minor cracks and
places where mortar lias fallen out
may be repaired by an unskilled
workman,” Phelan says. “If, how
ever, a wall is badly cracked and
crumbled and beyond the aid of
minor repairs, it may be necessary
to engage an experienced workman
to reconstruct all or part of the
wall.”
How to Fix Cracks
For minor repairs the amateur
workman should proceed as fol
lows:
First chip out the mortar be
tween masonry courses and brush
out the joint to remove all dust and
loose particles. Before applying
new mortar, dampen the joint.
A mixture of one part of cement
to two and one-half parts of sand,
or one part cement to three parts
sand is recommended in ordinary
cases. For damp cellars, however,
a one to two mixture is better.
The finished work should be wet
down daily for several days to in
crease the strength of the cement.
A damp cellar can be dried out
considerably by giving it more ven
tilation and sunlight. This is ac
complished by cutting more win
dows in the basement walls. Ordin
arily, this is a job for an experi
enced workman.
A coat of whitewash will greatly
aid in brightening the cellar.
Pennsylvania Plans
Psychiatric Hospital
Harrisburg, Pa., —(UP)— Penn- !
•ylvanla will have a State Psych
laric Hospital as a center of leader
ship in training physicians,nurses
and other personnel for mental in
stitutions; for research and for in
Prerision in Measuring Distance.
Dr. O. J. Lee in Scientific
Monthly.
Perhaps the most accurate work
Of distance measurement ever done
was carried out under the direction
of Col. William Bowie in measur
ing the distance of 22 miles between
two points on Mt. San Antonio and
Mt. Wilson in California as a base
line for Michelson's determination
of the velocity of light. The probable
error is not greater than one part
In 6,800,000, or about two-tenths of
an inch in 22 miles. The princess
who could feel the presence of a pea
through seven thick feather mat
Jbtmscs was no more sensitive than
tensive study of mental institutional
pioblems, and for vigorous treatment
of selected groups of patients, ac
cording to a statement by Governor
Gifford Pinchot.
The hospital will be established
at Pittsburg, where the Universi
ty of Pittsburg has offered the
state a site for the institution. A
the engineers who checked and
tested every tape, every instrument
and every operation in this notable
achievement in measurement.
BEAR HUNTERS USE PLANE
Great Falls. Mont. — <UP) —An
airplane is the latest aid to bear
hunters. H. C. Hollenbaek. a pilot,
William Gettman and C. E. Berk
ner flew from here to a meadow in
the Dry creek canyon, organized a
brief hunting expedition, bagged a
black bear and flew home again.
WILDCAT PUZZLES SHERIFF
Tevarkana, Ark., — (UP) —
Sheriff Walter Harris had a pres
legislative appropriation has been
granted to begin preliminary work,
“BY ANY OTHER NAME’’
Some folks adopt a high hat role
With words and even phrases;
Grandiloquent, they e'er consign
The simpler terms to blares.
Of itching toes they never speak,
But blurb of ath’letes foot;
Smoke menace, too, they will dis
cuss,
But never mention soot.
Perhaps by euphony they think
To mitigate an evil;
Curculionidae may not
Throw such a scare as weevil.
But I can't love a hopper more,
Nor hold his visit proper.
When entomologists discourse
On influx of orthroptera.
—Sam Page.
But Unde Sam Owns No Wheat.
From Minneapolis, Minn. Journal,
The country has been assured by
Chairman Stone of the farm board
—as it had previously been assured
by his predecessor—that the gov
ernment has not gone into the
grain business in competition with
private enterprise; that the Farm
ers National Grain corporation is
itself a private co-operative enter
prise owned by wheat growers
through membership in consti
tuent co-operatives, and sponsored
and protected by the board, but not
the property of the board.
But now that Wyandotte county,
Kansas, has assessed for taxation
22,000,000 bushels of the National
Grain corporation’s surplus wheat
stored in Kansas City terminal ele
vators, the corporation has prompt
ly appealed to the state tax com
mission for exemption. As the only
valid ground for tax exemption
would be government ownership of
the wheat in question, the appeal
implies that the National Grain
corporation’s officers regard the
wheat they hold as government
wheat, and net as the property of
the growers making up the corpor
ation’s constituent co-operatives.
To state the case more simply, the
government is not in the grain
business on days when the farm’
board’s policies are under scrutiny,
but only on days when states at
tempt to tax the Farmers National
Grain corporation's hoarded wheat.
SMALL BUILDING STRONG
Portland, Ore.—(UP)—One of th»
strongest buildings in the world will
be built on lonely Tatoosh Island,
off the Washington coast. Although
it will be only a small structure, to
house a federal weather bureau, it
was designed to withstand severe
earthquakes and winds of 120 miles
an hour velocity. The island is on
the fault passing from the Aleutian
Islands to California.
FAMOUS LION KILLED
Safford, Ariz. — (UP) — “Old
Slinky,” known as the thousand lion
of the Graham hills, will terrorize
ranohers no more. He was killed this
summer by Wiley Shirley, govern
ment hunter. The lion, hunted for
months, was an astute beast, it be
ing estimated that he killed $1,000
worth of livestock before falling vic
tim to Shirley’s gun.
DOG GUARDED LIQUOR
Mobile, Ala. — (UP) — While
a fellow officer held a vicious dog
in check outside by feeding him
tidbits and patting him on the head
a deputy sheriff climbed through
the window of a house here am)
confiscated liquor inside.
A Bad Start!
From Answers.
Mary’s Admirer (meeting her
father for the first time): I—er—
have the advantage of you, I be
lieve !
Father (grimly): You have! I’ve
just changed into my slippers.
ent given to him recently—and he
does not know Just what to do with
it. The present was a ferocious
wildcat that was captured by a
friend.
HARD YEAR TOR STORES
Cambridge, Mass. — (UP) — In
1930 the average department store
in the United States failed to earn
a profit after charging interest on
invested capital. This is the report
of the bureau of business research
of the Harvard school based on a
survey of earnings of 800 represen
tative stores, with sales in excess
of $1,700,000 000
COUNTY BO.\KD ASKED
TO CUT BUDGET
Planklnton, S. D. — (Special)—
The board of county commissioners
met to consider the proposed budget
for 1932 last, week and were waited
upon by a delegation of farmers
asking that it be reduced to the
lowest possible amount. Most of the
agitation seemed to be directed
against road work and deputy hire.
The board adjurned for a week
without taking any definite action
DAIRY HAS BIG
LOSS BY FIRE
fine Plant Near Chamber*
lain, S. D., Destroyed by
Mystery Blaze
Chamberlain, S. D. — (Special) —
The Riverside dairy six miles
south of Chamberlain was almost
wiped out by a mystery fire Friday
afternoon. A mammoth horse and
cattle barn, a new silo, milk houses,
granary, feed house and several
other small buildings burned. About
60 tons of hay. and 150 bushels of
corn and oats, oesides milking
equipment and machinery was
burned. An estimate of the dam
age is $15,000. All builldings were
covered by insurance but the grain
feed and machinery was a complete
loss. M. F. Cranny and sons are
owners and operators of the dairy
DECREASE SHOWN IN
GAS TAX COLLECTIONS
Pierre, S. D. — — Gasoline
tax collections during July totalled,
$521,274.67, a decrease of nearly
$14,000 from the amount received
during the same month a year ago.
Collections in July, 1930, aggregated
$535,847.57. A decrease In tourist
traffic is believed responsible for
the reduction.
The cigaret tax and tobacco deal
ers licenses showed decreased this
July compared with the same month
in 1930. The tax this July totalled
$39.19995 and licenses amounted to
$28,393.70. Last year the figures
were $46,325.05 and $30,515 respec
tively.
[ BUTTE COUNTY BOARD
SLASHES ITS BUDGET
Belle Fourche, S. D. — (Special)
—Butte county commissioners in
session here last week were par
ing down the 1932 budget with a
keen edged blade whetted on the
grindstone of adversity. The great
est cut on the road and bridge fund
which was cut from $70,000 to $40,
000. Other department also have
suffered sharp reductions#from the
amounts first submitted.
The reduction on officer's salar
ies has not met with favor. Butte
county being the only county in the
state which has proposed such a
cut.
TOWNS NATURAL ICE
SUPPLY EXHAUSTED
New Underwood, S. D.—(Special)
—The extreme hot weather of the
last few weeks together with the
short ice crop of last season have
exhausted the supply in the local
• ice house of Virgil Baldridge. Manu
factured ice is now being trucked
from Rapid City. A number of
homes are now equipped with elec
tric refrigerators and the city meat
market has an ice machine which
lightens the demand for ice.
FARMER ACCUSED OF
FIRING OWN BARN
Mitchell, S. D.—(SpeciaK—Fol
lowing an investigation by Charles
Tice, deputy state fire marshal from
Mitchell, David E. Wipf of Freeman
was bound over to the Hutchinson
county circuit court for trial on
charges of arson and defrauding an
insurance company.
The preliminary hearing was held
at Olivet August 7, before Judge S.
L. Clark who bound Wipf over to
circuit court on $5,000 bond. Wipf
was accused of setting fire to a barn
on his home in which five horse/
were burned to death.
NEW TRUCK LINE FROM
GAYVILLE TO SIOUX FALLS
Pierre, S. D,- —The Dobash
Transportation company of Sioux
Falls has been granted a certificate
by the state board of railroad com
missioners to operate a truck line
between Sioux Falls and Gayville,
via Alcester, Burbank, Vermilion
and Meckling.
The request was approved after a
hearing at Sioux Falls at which the
proposal for a new truck line was
supported by Sioux Falls and Ver
milion chambers of commerce. Rail
connections between these points
are indirect, it was explained, and
there are no direct truck lines fur
nishing the service proposed.
GROTON BAND CONCLUDES
SERIES OF CONCERTS
Groton, S. D.— ( Special)-The
Groton Municipal band has con
cluded a series of weekly concerts In
the city park under direction of C.
V. Sperati, formerly of the local
public schools but now director of
instrumental music in the Austin,
Minn., public schools. The concerts
were sponsored by the city and at
tracted large audiences throughout.
NEW FREE PAPER
APPEARS AT CANTON
Canton, S. D. — (Special) —The
first issue of the Canton Advertis
er. a new bi-weekly paper was dis
tributed Saturday. The paper is pub
lished by the Osbon Print shop and
is delivered by carriers free to Can
ton citizens and to farmer viators
in town. It Is to be published on
Wednesday and Saturday each
week.
FOUR IN FAMILY
HAVE PTOMAINE POISONING
Geddes, S. D. — (Special) —The
four members of the Mont McAlis
ter family of this city were taken
dangerously ill as a result of pto
maine poisoning, caused by eating
left over cold pork.
The family had attended the an
nual picnic of the Civic club at
Rest Haven and had brought home
part of their lunch.
They are under the care of Dr.
C. L. Bury and will recover in *
few days.
THIS CURIOUS WORLD
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Daily Health Service
Copper-Containing Foods Help
Build Blood, Survey Shows
OYSTERS. LIVER, PORK CON TAIN AMOUNTS OP MINERAL
BY DR. MORRIS FISHBEIN.
Editor, Journal of the American
Medical Association, and of liy
gria, the Ilealth Magazine
Recent research carried on in
many institutions has indicated
anew the Importance of minerals
In various food substances. These
minerals are concerned primarily
with the building of blood, but also
with other processes of growth and
repair in the human body. Not only
iron and copper are important, but
there seems to be some question
as to the exact parts played by
manganese, zinc, nickel, and other
metals.
Investigators In the University of
Wisconsin Jound that the addi
tion of copper to the diet was of
great importance in rebuilding blood
In anemia. Investigators in India
and elswhere believe that mangan
ese is of Importance in improving
growth and that it, as well as cop
per, is concerned in the develop
ment of hemoglobin, or red dbloring
matter, in the blood.
Because of these facts investigat
ors in the University of Wisconsin
have recently been making a study
as to the amounts of these elements
available In various food substances.
They find that|10 foods are particu
larly high in their manganese con
tent. These o r blueberries, whole
wheat, split peao, navy beans, cho
EXPLORERS SEND HOME 1
STRANGE FOREIGN PLANTS
t A
Washington, D. C.— (NEA) —
Foreign climes have yielded to plant
scientists of the office of foreign
plant introduction, of the depart
ment of agriculture, several inter
esting plants which, it is hoped, will
be adapted to soil conditions in the
United States.
Several of these plants are de
scribed by Knowles A. Ryerson, chief
of the office.
There is a palm tree which yields
an edible vegetable from its roots,
a sugar from its sap and a fragrant
fruit; a potato substitute which
grows to the size of a pumpkin, and
a blueberry that grows well on dry,
6andy soil.
Then there is a raspberry with
fruit three-quarters of an inch long,
a type of Japanese grass which is
expected to be of value for use on
golf courses, a 35-foot tree, the leaves
of which may be substituted for
spinach and honey suckles which,
after blooming, bear an edible fruit.
May Not Thrive Here
“Seeds and cuttings of these any
many other plants brought in by
the office's explorers from all parts
of the world are being planted and
grown experimentally in parts of the
country deemed most suitable," j
Ryerson advises.
"Many probably will not gcrmin- j
ate, and some which do germinate *
probably will not tlnive in the cli- ’
mate of the United States.
"For these reasons it is Impossible
to say which will prove to bo satis
factory for cultivation in this conn- t
try, although many which will not '
grow in the states undoubtedly will
do well in regions such as Hawaii,
the Philippines and other tropical
countries under administration of i
the United States.”
All Is Not Joy
This everlasting search of the de
partment of agriculture for new
plants has Jed many a plant scien
tist into danger. On a recent expedl
tion into the Orient, a party was at- i
tacked by tigf rs. Several natives were
killed before the American scientists
could beat off the animals.
Not only do these explorers ex
pose themselves to attack fiom
beasts and hostile tribes, but they
encounter disease germs of foreign
nature In the dark swamps and un
dergrowth of the jungles into which
they grope for new food for fellow (
citizens back home.
A Happiness Test. i
Prom the Chicago Journal of Com
merce.
Columbia university has com
pleted a test of 500 men between
the ages of 17 and 35 years, that
measured their individual happiness
—the only thing of the kind we
ever heard of. In general the test
showed even temper, health and re
ligion to be sources of happiness.
Some sources‘of unhappiness were
listed, among which were worry,
personal appearance, bad habits,
money matters, laziness, lack of
freedom and education, sex diffi
culties, love affairs, family trou
bles and heavy responsibilities.
No report is made as to what pro
portion of the 500 now are reason
ably happy, or think they are.
We are wondering when was our
happiest period. Tt may have been in
our early married life, but the one
event that made a close second in
our happiness, was when we got all
our debts paid after 25 years of in
Maple Syrup 50 Years
Old Still Kept Flavor
Andover, Ohio — (UP) — A can
•f maple syrup 50 years old, found
in the attic of her home, still was
of goed flavor and quality, Mrs.
Fanny Lindsley reported. The syrup
was made by her late husband, who
iad a nationwide trade.
5 Plus 0 Equals 9
Here’s a five-piece wardrobe you
ean make into nine different cos
tumes without adding a single
thing!
Ope white drew* one white lack
debtedness. We are not opecting.
great happiness now, such as ante
to us after our son returned home
from the World war safe and sound.
Of all things those we desire most
now arp freedom from pain and
peace of mind..
There are 1,000 things wc have U
be grateful for now, daily joys with
out which life would not be worth
living, and we have become recon
ciled to pain, so long as It does not
become intense. And whenever we
write a column that we think n»
good, it yields pleasure.
Up and Down.
Prom the Humorist.
Two members were talking in -the
smoking room of the club
“I understand your wife thought
of taking up law before she mar
ried von.” remarked one of them to
his friend.
“That's right,” replied the oth
er. "But. now she’s content to lay it
down.”
et, one colored dress, one jacket in
the same color, one print dress
combining the color and tire wliite.
The trick is this: Each dress
worn alone makes a total of Hues
costumts; and each dress worn with
each of the two Jackets makes she
more costumes. Result, nine cos
tume variations.
CONTRASTING EVENING COLOR
One way to get the fashionable
color contrast into the evening cos
tume is this: Have a black velvet
wrap lined in a color that cofitfasts
with the dress but matches the Jcw
*lrv and yiinoersi
colate, beet greens, bananas, kidney
beans and chard. Copper va» lea from
a very small amount in celery to a
very high amount in calve* liver.
Poods that contain good amounts of
copper are oysters, beef liver, mush
rooms, currents, chocolate, split peas
pork, liver and lobster. Ten foods
particularly high in iron are beef
liver, spinach, lima beans, calves
liver, navy beans, lean beef, chard,
watercress, kidney beans and oy
ster*.
It is obvious from these facts that
anyone who eats a widely varied
diet with good quantities c»l the
various meats, fruits and vefetabie*
that have been mentioned will get
all of these essential minerals that
he is likely to need. The average
daily intake of any of tiiew' metals
needs be relatively slight. It reaches
barely more than one hundredth
of a gram a day for any «me of
them. The average daily Intake of
six families indicated that the
amount taken daily by any lndivkl
i ual would be for mangan»«e 2 39
I milligrams; for copper 2.26, and for
iron 15.46.
The important fact is to realb*
the value of these minerals in blood
building and to see to it that the
daily diet contains plentiful quan
tities of the loc'Js that have beep
mentioned.

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