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Lake Charles commercial. (Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, La.) 1881-1898, October 01, 1881, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2013271051/1881-10-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 1
LAKE CHARLES, CALCASIEU PARISH, LA., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1881
NO. 13.
PROFUSION AL CARDS.
1 ABB 1311. A. i'dlKALl', Attumey
VX ut Lmv, Luke ClwrlcB, La., office
iorniorlv .M-rnjijii'l by Louih Leveque, on
«loiirt flume Snare.
July il, lHKl.-ly. _
( 8 L(HUGE H. WELLS, Attorney at
T Law, take Chari«*, Cah-asieu Far
imU, La. Fraet-ieea in Oalcawen, ("aiuer
«111 and Vernon parialies, and in Orange
and .lefferHon eoiuitiea, Texan.
July 9, 188].-flu*.
y A. GALLA rtiHEK,
A t tomev at
Law, will practice ip 1hia anil ad
joining pariahem. and before the Supreme
Court., at Opelousas.
Sep., 3, 188L-3y.
A J. KEARNEY, 1 Hut riot Attorney,
. 34th Judicial District, practices ill
tlie several jiurisbcK of the District.
< mice, in Lake Charles, at the Haskell
House.
Ofliee, in Leesburg, at Jiis residence.
July 9,1881.-3 y .
jTcT MUND AY. M. I)..
Nur<re«u. Piiysit iau and ObstetricUa,
MONTINI'ES to practice bis profes
won and can tie consulted at his
)ruj: Htoro, oo Kvan Ktropf. at al)
Lake Charles, La., July 9, ]881.-ly.
if HANK MAI« E H ,
TON SOKIAL AKTIST,
Kyan St., I«nke Clinrles.
TTAIE Cutting, Shaving, Shampoon
1 1. ill" and Hair Dyeing done ill the
latest styles.
July 9,'1881,-tf.
WKltEMlAD OBKIEK.
JAMKS iiLA Ut.
OBRIEN & BLAIR.
Contractors and Builders,
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
Julv !L 1883 ._jy.
S H I P B Y I L D I N G
AKl>
REPAIRING,
Contractors;, &e.
On South Bunk of Luke Charles
Sept. 3, 1881.
t'uriiitur© liepaired.
TAYJNbl pennainuitly located in the
1 town of take Clnirles, J am pro
wed to repair al I kinds of furniture, til
ort notice, and on reasonable terms.
..TUaukful for past patronage, J solicit
(siontiuuauce of the same.
sFuniittire revurnished at the house of
owner.
'8hop ou Kirbv street, nearltyau,T«U*
>v building. 1 c. li. Jilt i ce.
Aug. 13, 1881,-ly.
I). B. LYONS.
ALALElf in Fresh and Picklod Beef,
t Fork, M utton, west side of the
Iblic square, on the Lake shore.
TREE dELlVEBY to regular customers
fro ugh out the town.
Thanks for the liberal patronage here
Vfore extended to him, he solicits a con
luauee of the same.
.July 9, 1881.-1 y .
-I.o. I. C.-m
oss is it .—pox t okumuja: !
JUST IN TIKE TO SAVE MONEY !
la*! 1 hare found iJw njjju man M ike
I iÿ hi jAaeefw 0 ood n ail Cheap 1,1 'ark!
you want any work done in the line
of .Hooting, (.-Littering or repairing, or
good assortment of his own mauufue
reit Tinware, or any old stoves lepair
,vuugotojD8. VOLTM'S Tin i*h
ek on Kvuu street, bet ween Hill i____
■ streets, opposite E. A. GaUuugLor's
tsidunee. .Sign of the Dig Coffee Pot.
.July 9,188.1.-1 y.
FJEUX RKLLOCty,
—'WilTAI-r
I'-v-hinidt gfc >aie<rier
AWLESAJÆ GROCERS
—AND—
IMFOKTKHH,
», 49, 91 4 55 Peter« St., 89, 41, 43 4 46
Pulton St., New Orleans.
July 9, .1881 .-Jv.
tri 40 It 30 3> «J L 30
-—or THK—
TEAM ER NETTIE.
DM and after July 1, 1881, t he Steam
er Nettie wiU make regular trips be
ui Lake Charles, West Lake Charles
Bagdad, viz : f
ee hake Charles for West hake Charte»,
....... 0.15 ............ a. ».
....... U ...\ ........ a. ju.
....... 1.99 ............ r. «.
........ 9.16 ............|T. il.
Leave» Lake Uh&rtoe fur Bagdad.
............. 3,30 a. ai.
............. 8 r. s.
vee West Lake Charte» fer Lake Charte».
............ 7 A. M.
.............11.40 A. .M.
............ 3.40 r. ai.
............ li ............ p. Al.
Leaves Bagdad for Lake Charte*, ,
............. 9.-|.-> I S
............ 44» ............ r. .v.
E. H. NICHOLS', Master.
July Id, J881. -if.
New Orleans
(BE 1 P USD STORE.
E. KAISER & CO..
—DEALERS IN—
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS,
CROCKERY AND TIN
WARE.
ALL KINDS OF STAPLE (« ROPERIES.
We are also Agents for the
New Home Sewing Machine
NValtliam. AY ateke
order to make room !
for our Fad Stork, ire will j
clone out our Summer stock
of goods at ten per cent. less
than our former prices.
\0U IS VOIR TIME TO SEGUE
1 UBGAIN 8 !
Come and sec for yourself!
LAKE CHARLES, LA.
Aug. 13,1881 ,-tf.
HASKELL HOUSE,
Ryaoj Street, take Charles, ta.
named
ise to rtui it in first
H AVING leased the shove
House, I propose to rim it HHHi
lass style. 'Hie table will be kept on
the Restaurent ulsu, and no exertion
will be considered wo great, to rentier
guests eourfortable.
THCB. R. REYNOLDS,
aug 30, '81 .-tf. laissée.
Referri ng to the a ljoye, in retiring from
the Hotel, I desire to return in y thanks
to those who have so liberally patron
ized me in the past, and eonlideutiy re
eommeud my friends to my successor,
knowing dial he will give ample satts
faetion, as a cabrer to tin traveling
publie. W. H. HASKELL.
St, Iroiiiri Foundry,
I Id & 117 Piue St.,
nxAjjms jx
Priai my und Wrümg Papers, Curd*
and Card Hoard, Tags,
Emdopes,
rrifiUttg Inks, Bronze.*, &e.
Programme Cards
W'eddiuv
J tü > <9, A88I.
Wedding Fluvelopcs, 1
Papers, Ac.
m. J. rosteet,
- DEALER IN
IDHY GOODS
CLOTHING, BOOTS AND
SHOES, HATS AND
CAPS.
GROCERIES,
-AND—
G
:
!
,
xmtiintiy oil haml a large I
Lube CimrlcH, ]At.
July 9, 1881,-ly.
Il, I). NIX,
GENERAL DEALER,
Nix's Ferry, Calcasieu
Hiver, ta.
j HAVE
L and varied assortment of
STAPLE AND FANCY PHY
COOPS, AND HEADY
MA PE CLOTH I NO.
My stork of Boots, 81ums and Huts, is
not excelled hv any in the country.
My stock of Groceries is as complete
as cau lie, and Ireingrcjihiujslied weekly.
From my long experience in flurchan
disiiig ill this palish, I feel confident of
being able to satisfy ulJ who will do me
the favor to give me a call.
First class, hand made
CYERIÎSH HHINGLES,
always on hand, in any quantities.
ProrniA and assiduous attention to Urn
F F BB Y,
day und night. I am specially prepared
for crossing droves of horses ami cuttle,
and for talcing care of tirem, having just
completed a
LAUGE PASTUHE,
winch are plenty of grass, water and
shade.
ÎS 4 - Highest market price paid Ibr
LoUott, Wool uud Hides.
Give me a call. li D. NJX.
Ang. J3, B*L-Jy.
a
a
it
it
Advertise.*
Tlie following lines were taken from
"The Agents' Herald;" and the last four
lines added by a friend, were handed in
with tlie request to publish :
Ye men of business, step this way,
Please notice what I have to say ;
'Tis simply this, 1 would advise :
Do not forget to advertise.
Suppose the cost, seems rather high,
'Twill surely pay you by and by :
And all the'world will soon despise
The man who does not advertise.
With your favors be impartial,
Send vour orders to the Commkrci.w.,
And your friends will he able to tell,
When some fresh goods you have to sell
An Important Conference.
[X. O. Democrat.]
Gov. Wiltz's circular letter to
the sheriffs, assessors and tax col
lectors of Louisiana, refers to one
of the most umnanageble obstacles
in the pathway of the administra
tion. The Democrat 1ms on many
occasions discussed the cumbrous
and unwieldy nature of our finan
eial methods, and shown how im
possible it is for the State, under
existing regulations, to properly
utilize its resources and realize its
legitimate revenues. The defects
are radical. They cannot be rem
edied by any application of the
law, however ingenious. The law
itself must be overhauled and the
evil attacked at its source and
fountain-head. To that end it was
peculiarly appropriate to call to
gether those officials whose expe
rience has shown them the char
acter and extent of the question at
issue—whose familiarity with the
practical operation of the law will
ha ve prepared them to devise the
suitable corrective.
The Goveuor has asked the sher
iffs, assessors and tax collectors of
the State to meet him in the Senate
Chamber at tlie State-House, on
Wednesday, October Iff, and we
sincerly trust that these officials
will honor his request with prompt
and cordial response. The finan
cial embarrassments of the State
are not essential. The resources
of Louisiana are abundantly ade
quate to its liabilities. But so long
as the existing processes are ad
hered to, our finances will remain
crippled and our delinquency will
increase. A full and free discus
siou of the subject, and an inter
change of opinion and experience
and suggestion by those officials
who for years past have had the
workings of the law constantly be
fore them, should evolve a practi
cal and permanent remedy. We re
peat our aspiration that tlie coufer
enee may he universally attended
and that a stop may he put to the
blundering methods which involv
ed us iu 8ucJi unfortunate contu
sion.
Adverllsiiig That Fa id.
J Printers Circular.]
a lining, Sheriff' of Dead
wood, D. T., wa« iu Ht. Louie on
business, and be remembered that
tlie year before a Ht. Louis man
had been up to Dead wood and left,
owing a man several hundred dol
lars, which was to lie paid as soon
as he got home. Manning met the
man in Ht. Louie, and he said he
would hand him the money next
day, hut days passed and the mon
ey did not come, though tlie man
was amply able to pay.
One morning Maiming inserted
a personal iu one of tlie newspa.
pers to the effect that if the man
who left Deadwood between two
days did not pay tlie money he
forgot to pay, before night, the
whole circumstance would he pub
lished the next day, The notice
was signed, ''John Manning, Hher
iff of Deadwood." Before il o'clock
a young man called at Manning's
Hotel and said be had come to pay
he had borrowed to get out of
Deadwood. Maiming found out
who the money was borrowed from
and took it to carry to the Dead
wood citizen, remarking that he
was not the man referred to, but
it was a mighty mean Hheriif who
would not carry money to a frieud.
The next man to call was the one
he wanted, and he paid the money
and apologzied, and begged tlie
Hheriff to say nothing about it
During the day seven citizens of
Ht. Louis called on Maiming and
paid him money for citizens of
Deadwood, believing the Hheriff'
had reference to them in his no
tif e; and after he had gone away,
another eitizeu ««died and asked
the clerk tor Manning, but the
clerk said the other fellows had all
been there and paid up ? and this
man had better keep his money.
The Hheriff'said he always thought
advertising paid, but he never had
it deruonsG ated to his satisfaction
before.
iu
at
be
its
ter
at
his
and
and
of
of
left
the
on
: \
The Dead President.
[N. O. Democrat.]
James Abram Garfield was born
on the nineteenth of November,
1831, at Orange, Cuyahoga county,
Ohio. He was the youngest of
four children, and soon after his
birth his father, Abram Garfield,
died, leaving his mother with a
hard prospect in life. She is a wo
man of strong character and won
derful energy. When James was
quite young he was of service to
the struggling family, and by the
time lie was 12 years old helped
considerably toward its comfort
and support. The Garfield house
hold endured the trials of severe
poverty, and the early days of the
future President were passed in
such privations as have fallen to
the lot of few tenions men. At
sixteen he was a raw country boy,
full of vigor, and already remarka
bly well educated for his opportu
nities. He hud a boyish idea of
going to sea, but was dissuaded
from doing so by his mother. He
was then serving as a common ca
nal hand.
When he was 18 he was enabled
to attend school by the industry
and privations of his mother.
He taught school and saved $300
with which he started to Williams
College in 1854. Finishing a bril
liant course there, he entered Hi
ram College as professor of ancient
lauguages.
His first appearance in polities
was in a Htate campaign. In 1830
he was elected to tlie Htate Benute
us a strong anti-slavery man. He
attained great influence in the Leg
islature and was considered one of
the readiest speakers and strong
est debaters in the body.
When the war began, he entered
into it with great enthusiasm. He
was appointed by Gov. Dennison
lieutenant-colonel of the Forty
second Ohio regiment, but was
made colonel as soon as the regi
ment was organized. He rose to
the rank of brigadier-general, and
was made chief of staff of the Army
of the Cumberland. At Chicku
mauga he rendered distinguished
service. This wus the last active
war duty he performed. Soon af
terwards he was promoted to the
rank of major-general of volun
teers. In 1803 he resigned his com
mission to accept an election to
the Thirty-eighth Congress from
what is now the uinetecuth Ohio
district. He served successively
iu every Congress until he was
elected to tlie presidency. In 1877
he was a member of the Electoral
Commission. Before his nomina
tion at Chicago he wus elected to
succeed Judge Thurman iu the
United States Senate, but on the
day that he would have taken his
seat iu that body he was inaugu
rated President of the United
States with the grandest cere mo
nies ever known on such an occa
sion.
Tiie congressional career of the
Pxesident is fr esh in the mind of
the country. He was one of tlie
most prominent figures that has
appeared in Washington since the
war. After Mr. Blaine went to tlie
Senate lie wus the acknowledged
leader of the Republican party iu
tlie House. It was bis eminent
service iu this field us welt us his
great popularity in the doubtful
State of Oiiio, which caused the
anti-Grant factious to unite on him
at Chicago. In tiie canvass lie de
veloped fine powers of political
leadership and created great en
thusiasm throughout tlie South and
West.
Of his administration little need
be said, as it has been so brief and
its every important fact is so well
known.
Garfield when 27 years old mar
ried Miss Lucretia Rudolph, daugh
ter of a Maryland tanner, whom lie
had met when both were students
Hiram College. lie was a de
voted member of the Christian or
Camhellite church and frequently
appeared as a lay preacher iu its
pulpits. One singular incident of
his life was that widie spending a
vacation iu North PownaJ, Vt., he
taught a writing dass iu a school
where Chester A. Arthur had been
principal a year before. Tjie Presi
dent was a man of fine physique
and just in the prime of his power.
Personally he was very attractive,
and was notable for the simplicity
his manners, which the honors
the White House seem to have
left entirely unaffected.
a
a
so
ful
a
a
the
So
life
ted
ced
an
to
Indianapolis is agitated over the
enfrircerujiint of tire Sunday law,
the Police Commisstowers having
ordered tire saloons to lie closed
that day.
up
me
a
\
The Sew President.
[N. O. Democrat.)
As to the birthplace of Chester
Allan Arthur, there has been a dis
pute, which, during the late cam
paign, attained considerable im
portance. It is generally conced
ed, however, that he was born in
Fairfield, Franklin county, Ver
mont, October 5,1830. His father,
William Arthur, was a Protestant
Irishman. In America he became
somewhat famous in the ministry
of the Baptist Church.
Young Arthur had good advan
tages in early life. At the age of
18 he graduated at Uniou College
and began to teach school. He
ceased teaching and spent two
years in the study of law at Balls
torr Springs. Again he taught
school, until in 1851 he had $500,
with which he went to New York
to practice law, entering the office
of Erastus D. Culver, and was soon
admitted to a partnership, Iu 1857
he went West, but soon returned
to New York and resumed the
practice of his profession. His
most notable case was the celebra
ted Lemmon suit, where he was as
sociated with Mr. Evarts, in which
tlie validity of the fugitive slave
law iu Virginia was destroyed.
His only service during the war,
outside his profession, was for a
brief period on the staff of Gen.
Hunt, in the army of the Potomac,
as inspector of New Yor k troops
in the field.
Mr. Arthur's car eer in polities
has been very short. He was a
member of the Saratoga conven
tion that founded tiie Republican
party in New York. He has fig
urged conspicuously as a local
politician in New York city, andin
1871 ho was nominated by Presi
dent Grant to be collector of the
llort of New York. This valuable
position he held until July 12,1878,
when he was removed by Presi
dent Hayes for alleged use of the
oftloo for political purposes. He
returned to the praetiee of law as
member of the firm of Arthur,
Phelps, Knewal Ä Ransom, in New
York city.
t'hlcago and the Michigan Sufferers.
[Chicago Tribune.]
The inhabitants of Chicago
should be interested in the fact
that when a beggarly contribution
of $500 for the Michigan tire suf
ferers was received at a little town
known us Ray City, to be forward
ed thence to the afflicted people,
meeting of the citizens was at
once held and the sum of $2,500
subscribed on the spot. And so it
goes out to all the wofld by the
tar-reaohing voaceH of the tele
graph that Chicago, which received
six or seven million dollars in con
tributions when similarly afflicted,
now gives $500 for the sufferevs,
by one of the most appalling visi
tations of the age, while Bay City,
with a thirtieth or our population,
gives five times as much, Some
thing has been done to improve the
exhibit thus made of Chicago's lib
erality, Imt tlie whole business ts
tedious and so inefficiently
managed that it is siuudy disgrace
to the city and to all coifcerued'
——— »» » ■—
While iu Chicago recently a cit-
izen of Jackson, Mich., was paid
trade dollar iu u business trans-
action, which afterward, on close
examination! he found quite de-
fective in weight. Upon carefully
scrutinizing it further be detected
little pin emerging fr om tlie edge,
and pressing the face of the coin
flew open, revealing on the inside
photo of a lady's countenance.
admirably is the work done
that, when closed the eye cauuot
detect the place of contact of the
detached circular face with the
body of the pispe.
----- «P . # -m -
Henry King, who was serving a
sentence at Clinton Prison,
New York, for a murder commit
in Now York, has been senten
at Pluttshurg to he hanged on
November 4 for murdering Mi
chael Hamilton, of New York, a
fellow convict. They had a dispute
to which was the tatter man,
Arthur or Garfield, whidi led to a
challenge to fight. They repaired
a shed where King struck Ham
ilton twice in theheail with an axe,
inflicting mortal wounds.
With pleading eyes she looked
from the piano and sang, "Call
your darling again." Rut he
refused, as there is wo telling whew
rwaw will be introduced to a
breach of promise suit in these
days.

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