OCR Interpretation


Lake Charles commercial. (Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, La.) 1881-1898, November 12, 1881, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2013271051/1881-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

a
Commercial
OL. 1.
LAKE CHARLES, CALCASIEU PARISH, LA., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1881.
NO. 10.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
ABRTEL A. FOCRXET, Attorney
at Law, Lake Charles, La., office
-riv oecopied 1 iv Louis Leveque, on
1 lionne Snare,
ly «, 1881 ,-ly.
BORGE H. WELLS, Attorney at
Law, Lake Charles, Calcasieu Par
, La. Practices in Calcasieu, Camer
an<l Vernon parishes, and in Orange
Jefferson counties, Texas.
i3y V, IttW Mku.
A. GALLA UGH Eli, Attorney at
. Law, will practice in this and ad
ing parishes, and before the Supreme
»art . at. Ordonnas.
Hep., S, 1881 .-ly. ^ _
J. KEARNEY. District attorney,
. ]#Ui Judicial District, praitices m
"ncreral jiarishesot thc District.
Oiikie, in Lake Charles, at the Haskell
louse. ,
Office, in Ledshurg, at his residence
J efly St, 1881 .-ly.
C MINI) AY. M, I).
-geoii, Oiysitiit und bkdet ikiaii,
< JSjfTN I IKK to prindice his protes
y s.iOti and can we consulted at his
"u«rito9>e, oir Hvan street', at all hours.
.LakeCharles. La., July «, I881/-1 y.
î )î èN rï> ri i V -
li.ttli AIN coot i-i-mt'H t « J.....
y M hi pr'dideKiun, and ean he coasottv-d
. 1 he residenoe vf Mr. John McCormick
Gold and Amalgam fillings, at lowest
ices. Artificial teeth inserted, from
to a full set. Teeth extracted skill.
|ly. [octÄTSl.
•UANK MAIHE«,
TON SOIT! A L ARTIST,
yum Ht., laite t liurlcw.
AIR Cutting, Shaviny, Sh-afiipoon
big and Hair Dyeing done in the
est st vles.
July R,'1881.-tf.
PETER FASSOLI),
-PRACTICAL—
iitcliimiker mid Jeweler,
Ryan St., Lake Charles, La. i
tches and Jewelry Bkillfiilly Repaired j
amt Warranted.
~'ine Stork of Jewelry Always ou
Haml.
ct. fg, 'S.l.-tf.
«kmiau ■v'bkikx. jambs ni.Aitt.
OKEIEN & BLAIR,
Htra-elHrsii mid liuildyi'N.
LAKE ATIARLGS, LA.
July 9, 1881.-ly.
V 1 LHBBE,
SHIP H FIL'D'/NO
ANO
REPAIRING,
tf. l'oiji 1 'at-ior.s, A.c, "
(hi South Huuk of Lake Charles.
Sept. 8, J881 .
" (i. 'KANN,
P IT A H M A C 1 S T ,
SlXCK.sSOli TO
Dr, rJ, C- Mmiday.
Ivsiciaiis' prescriptions carciul'ly ]>rc
parod, day or night.
Met. .10, 1881 .-tf.
t"i.irniUi J'c> R epaired.
TAV-ING pcrtnancfitly located in the
1 town ot Lake ÉU aides, 1 am pre
u-od do repair all kinds of fiwml.uiv, at
urt notice, aud.pu re-aoonaWe terms- _
Ti,iaukt'ul fur past- Umfougge, f solvit,
i-otinntuuice of the sanie.
Furniture revtuuiiahed at the house ot
Aug. FF 1881. ly.
~A£/U. X*
ILIJONS iIN I I • 1X >N 'J' < DG AU* LI'» •
JUST IN TIME Ï0 SAVE MONEY !
I iiutl J hwf fvund tilif rigid wm •"
right i>luM for <JmU oiid Cheap WwkJ
F vo i want (uivwork 4i >iui . t *^° ,iue
Ol K luting, Guttering or repairing, or
' „uîssortoientoi lus own mauufae
t jofing, Guttering or repairing, w
assortment of his own mauuiac
cri XLuware, orauv old «toves lepau
réefi
-.„pee. ------
nly W, IHSl.-dv
tc atreeis, opposite i> A. Gidhtugln r a
idenue. Sign of the RigCwAoe wot.
•yk, ISSl-Mv- _ _ ..... ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■
Ixmis Type ï'm&éry,
lid A HIT FL»e Ms,
jkEAÏ/WtM IX
hi-tiny end )Y ni in<j Peptrs., (Un d»
and Card Board, Tag*,
Enrdojjo*,
JYiutilig Ißkü» BfftBaCS) &f .
igrauuue Cards, Wedding Envelope«,
Wedrliug Papers, to',
uly 1», 1881.
oh work of ah dcacri^irions «lone with
vtuess and despatch at this ofiu'*.
New Orleans
CHEAP CM STORE.
E. KAISER & C0„
-DEALERS IN—
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
HOOTS, SHOES, HATS, caps,
i
j
CROCKERY AND TIN
WARE.
ALL KIUIS OF STAPLE GROCERIES.
We are also Agents for the
New Home Sewing Machine
-—and —
Waltham Wut*h«s.
tr ///, order to muhe room
for our Full Stock, ire tritt
clone out our Summer .stock
of good* at ten per cent, less
th an our former prices.
\ 0 H IS YtK'R TIME Tt> SEIIRE
JURO AITsLS !
Chute aiwi she for youjaelf 1
LAKE CITA B LEE, I A.
Aug. 18, 1881 .-tf
HASKELL HOUSE,
Rya.ii Steel, Lake Charles, La.
H AVING learned the above named
House, X propose to run it iu first
chias stvle. The fahle will he kept .on
tin- Restaurant phu», and no exertion
wà ^pgpnsi'leivd too go at. to render
""'ratis/R. REYNOLDS,
uugä), Tl. -tJ. Lessee. _
LAKE HOUSE,
Ojh> o.sile tli o Court
fickle Olmdc»,
Umy, FeeB Stahle and Sample R«»«
Ear Atooin and HU hard Saloon
Aiftsched.
GREEN HALL,
Hej >t. LS, '83. Propriefor.
KINU'S KK 8 TAI KANT,
p tytiu mt- f jahJim v amvfc'b
» rKAJit at all hours, and einslppwrs
NI ma v rest assured that their appe
tites will he satiated,
j uiy 0, 1881, yv
M. J. ROSTEET,
-DE ALEE IN—
DRY GOO D S
CLOTHING, HOOTS AND
SHOES, HATS AND
CAPS.
GROCERIES,
—AND
IjEMRAL jiebcuisdise,
Lnlte Cimrles, IFn.
July 9, 1881.-1 y .
; H, 1 ), NIX,
; GENERAL DEALER,
>ix '* JV,ry * C,,I<fnwtow
Hiver, Ln.
HAVE constantly on hand
and varied assortment of
large
ETABLE AND FANCY DRY
GOODE, AND READY
MADE CLOTHING.
My stock of Boots, f-lioes and Hats, is
not excelled by any in the country.
My stock of Groceries is as complete
as can lie, and being replenished weekly.
Fron» my long experience in merchan
dising in Uli» parish, X feel confident nf
being alite to satisfy all who will do me
the favor to give nie a call.
First class, hand made
CYPRESS SHINGLES,
always on hand, in any (pmntilietj.
Prompt and assidumisattention to the
W K IT R Y ,
dav and night. J am s|K'cially prepared
(t,r crossing droves of horses and cat He,
and for taking care pf the#!, liavjng wet
completed a ^
J.AKX1E iWisTFHÉ,
in which are plenty of grass, water and
single.
\j, . Highest miuket price paid for
Cotton, Wool and Hide».
Give me » eaty
Aug. 13 , 1881 .-ly.
H, ». NiX.
A Xobleman's Romance.
[Glasgow Herald.]
As a bit of Melbourne gossip
arising out of the recent visit of
the Detached Squadron of Mel
bourne, we need not conceal the
rumor, which is believed to have
truth to rest upon, that Lord
Charles ScoR, captain of tjie
Bacchante, has been engaged to be
married to Miss Ada Ityan, daugh
ter of Mr. Ryan of Mount Macedon,
Victoria. It is said that Mr. Ryan
did not readily acquiesce in the
purpose of the two principals in
this affair of the heart, and at the
most he would only consent con
ditionally—the conditions being
that the Duke of Buceeleuch, fa
ther of the love-shiitten sailor,
sliohld be consulted, in the' first
place, and that the affair should
he postponed for twelve months,
Here is how the Melbourne Bul
letin (suppressing the names) lias
put the story in its pages, ''Bhe
was a beautiful brunette, with a
certain witchery in her eye that
had charmed and tascinated the
gallant and noble captain. As they
sat together in the conservatory,
lie, in bluff', manly, sailor-like fash
ion, asked her for her hand—her
heart was already his. 'Oh, my
lord!' she said, blushing up to
her eye-lids, 'you must really ask
papa.' And ask papa that noble
and gallant captain did next day.
'No,' said the old man, sternly; '1
love my daughter, and if she mar
ries into your family 1 fear.iu the
end she might he unhappy; besides,
although you can answer for your
self, you do not know how she
would he received by your people.'
'But,' pleaded the captain, 'if I
write home and get my father's
and mother's consent, will you not
give way ? 'Well' replied the fa
ther, 'get that 'fixed, and then we
will talk aboutit, for 1 do not wish
to stand in the way of my daugh
ter'« happiness.'" And now, as
the Bulletin puts the matter, "there
is a letter speeding its way home
over the snowy billows, watched
by the two young and anxious
hearts. Will it all end happily t"
We shall see.
The Pince Vlhere Cats <airt Live.
[California Free Press. ]
Jim Townsend, of Lundy, has
been making some experiments
with an ordinary domestic cat. It
lias been repeatedly stated that a
cat could not live at an altitude of
13,000 feet above the sea. Mr.
Townsend has demonstrated that
sucli is the fact. On Monday last
he and another gentleman made
the ascent of Oastle Beak, which
is a little over 13,000 feet high,
They took with them a cat -Thom
as—that was a year old, and hart
lived at an altitude of 0,000 feet
with no symptoms of disease. Mr.
Tpwnsend had the eat in a box,
and us they went up he took ob
servations and noted very care
fully it« every movement. When
the summit was reached they pitch
ed their tent- This was about 2
o'clock in the afterppon. The cat
partook of some food, and after
playing for ait hour or so, fell asleep
and did not wake up until near
midnight. When if did recover
[;o,te]ciQasuess 4 set up a fowling
and appeared much distressed,
Townsend pitied itand endeavored
to make it feel at home, but of no
use, Jt kgpt up . its constant
moaning,and displayed symptoms
of having lits. When morning pa me
the cat was ottered food, but it
refused to cat and acted eyeu
more strangely than during the
night. Townsend says it would
open its mouth as if gasping for
breath; would jump about, and
then go to sleep and wake up with
a start. All this while cfose watch
was kept and every movement
noted. At 5 o'clock in the after
noon the eat died of exhaustion.
Circumstantial Evidence.
Many readers will doubtless re
collect the tragical fate of Burton,
in Missouri, on which a novel was
founded, that still continues in the
libraries. A young lady, belonging
to a genteel and very proud family
in Missouri, was beloved by. a
young man named Burton, but un
fortunately her affections were fix
ed on one less worthy. He left
her with a tarnished reputation.
She was by nature energetic and
high-spirited; her family were very
proud; and she lived in the midst
of a society which considered re
venge a sacred virtue, autl name«!
it honor» Misled by this false pop
ular sentiment ami her own excited
feelings, she resolved to »repay
tier lover's treachery by death
iter ltuct n uraiw-u ...» in.»..»
. , , , . ,,
But she kept her secret so well)
. . .
that no one suspected her puipose
, . . . ... ,
tough she purchased pistols amt |
th
practiced with them daily. Mr.
Burton gave evidence of his strong
attachment by renewing his atten
tions when the world looked cold
ly upon her. His generous kind
ness won her bleeding heart, but
the softening influence of love did
not lead her to forego the dread
ful purpose she had formed. She
watched for a favorable opportuni
ty and shot her betrayer when no
one was near to witness the horri
ble deed. Some little incident ex
cited the suspicion of Burton, and
he induced her to confess to him
the whole transaction. It was ob
vious enough that sttspiciou would
naturally fasten upon him, the well
known lover of her who had been
so deeply injured. Circumstantial
evidence was fearfully against him,
and lie soon saw that Ids chance
was doubtful; but with affectionate
magnanimity he concealed this
from her. He was convicted and
condemned. A short time before
the execution he endeavored to
cut his throat, but his life was
saved for the cruel purpose of
taking it away according to the
cold-blooded barbarism of the law.
Bale and wounded, he was hoisted
to the gallows before the gaze of a
Christian community
'ihc guilty cause ot all tins was,
almost hantle when she tuuud
that he hail saun heed liuiiMali
to save her. Hhu immediately
published the whole history ot her
wrongs and revenge. Her keen
sense of wounded honor was in no
cordanoe with public sentiment.
Her wrongs excited indignation
and compassion, and the knowl
edge that an innocent and magnate
inions man bail been so brutally
treated excited« général revulsion
of popular feeling. No one wished
for another victim, and she was
left unpunished, save by the rec-
ords of her memory.
-- —*»—♦—«» — : ---
In. Goan Hands.-—H e was a
youqg country fellow, a litlle awk
ward and bashful, hut of sterling
worth of cliaractcr. tihe was a
Oinciunatti belle, and had sense
enough to appreciate his worth
despite his awkwardness and busli
fulnesg, apd was his fipneoe. On a
gloomy Öuuday evening last win
ter, they were standing iu front of
the window in the beautiful parlor
of her home on East Walnut llills,
watching the suowflakes rapidly
falling outside. He was not up in
small society tiilk, and, being hard
up for'something to say, remarked,
as he watched the snow falling:
"This will be hard an the old
man's sheep."
"Never mind, dear." said she,
slipping her arm around liim, "1
will take care of one of them."—
[Cincinnatti Commercial.
One of the ^rid settlers of the
Isles of Shoals seeing the name
Psyche on a hull of a yacht the
other day, spelled it out slowly,
and then exclaimed, "Well, if that
ain't the dujndost way to spell
fish !"
The Commercial Traveller.
[R. J. Burdette.]
What would I do without "the
boys!" How often have they been
my friends. I go to a new town.
I don't know where to go. The
man with thte samples gets off at
the same station. I follow him
without a word or tremor. He
trails the 'bus driver by name and
orders him to "get out of this," aa
soon as wt»ure seated. And when
I follow him i am inevitably cer
tain to go to the best house there
iN in the place, He shouts to the
clerk By name, and fires a joke at
the landlord as we go in. He
looks over my shoulder as I regis
ter after him, and hands me his
card with a^shout of recognition. He
peeps at the register again ami
. , no
watches the clerk assign me to 98.
, . , ,
"Ninety no thing!' ho shouts,
/ . K
"Who's m lot" The clerk says he
, I ,
j ^ ,, he wumt .; , coultl Uartl
»Ulnu.li him, ami 1 am
, .
| " _______
is saving 13 for Judge Dryasdust.
"Well, lie be blowod," says my
cheery friend. "Give hit» the attic,
and put this gentleman in RS,"
And if the clerk hesitate* he seiz
es the pen and gives, me Ii5 him
self; and then he calls the porter,
orders him to carry up toy baggage
and put a fire iu 12, aud then iu
the same breath adds: What time
will you be down to supper, Mr.
Burdette!" And be waits for me,
and, seeing that I am a stranger
in the town, he sees that I am
eared for, and that the waiters do
not neglect me; he tolls me about
the town, the people, and the bus
iness. Re is breezy, cheery, so
ciable, full of new stories, always
good uatured; he frisks with cigars,
and overflows with "thousand-mile
tickets;" he knows all the best
rooms in all tue hotels; he always
lias a key for the car seats, aud
t urns a seat for himself and his
friends without troubling the
brakesman, but lie will ride on the
wood-box or stand outside to ac
commodate a, lady, or he will give
his seat to un old man. For three
years I have travelled with him,
from Colorado to Maine, and I
have seen the worst aud best of
him, and 1 know that the best far
Taliuagc oil the 1'islol.
N —
Talmage has said many good
tilings, but few more applicable to
an existing evil than the following :
"Another practical use of this
great national calamity is that it
lias disgusted more than over poo
pic with this free use of firearms.
On the frontier, or if it is your busi
ness as an officer of the law to
make the arrest of a desperado,
you had better he armed, but it is
high time that all respectable citi
zens snap in two their sword canes
and unload their deadly weapons.
"If you move in respectable so
ciety in Brooklyn, or New York,
or Washington, or London, you
have no need of any more weapons
than the two God gave you—two
honest fists—and they are easily
loaded. If you feel the need of
having a pistol in your pocket you
are a miserable coward. If you
are afraid to go down the street
unarmed, you had better get your
grandmother with her kuittiug
necdles to go with you. A pistol
is the rtu-atvest and most iufornal
weapon ever invented. It is the
weapon of to sneak. I would as
noon carry a toad iu my vest
pocket."
A gentleman in Selma, Ala.,
when only twepty-oup .years old,
married a widow of fifty. A few
days ago, when sixty-five years of
age, he married a young lady of
twenty-one
________pr t -rrn --------
An Irishman drinks whiskey, a
Frenchman wine, an Englishman
ale, a Diitchiuan beer, aud an
American anything he pan get.

xml | txt