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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1895-1897, September 23, 1897, Image 2

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AVATERBU RY EVENING DEMOCRAT, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1897-
asy to Take
asy to Operate
Are features peculiar to Hood's Pills. Small In
ike, tasteless, efficient, thorough. As one man
nloodTs
said: " You never know you
tave taken a pill till It is all ITT
over." 25c. C. L Hood & Co., BT III 9
jProprietors, Lowell, Mass.
Xh only pills to take wltii Hood's SarsaparlLia.
Waterbury Dernocraf.
Wfi WantTn Shnw
W 0 ' m m M 111. a w
You the new goods which are arriv
ing daily, they are interesting, pretty
and right up to-date and the prices are
astonishingly cheap.
" An acquaintance with our large stock
Is essential to a knowledge of the best
and newest there is la the market.
FURNITURE will never be any cheap
er, make your selections soon, for future
stock ia sure to be higher.
CARPETS,
OIL CLOTH,
LINOLEUM,
and MATTINGS;
Also the
"GOOD NEWS',
RANGES.
H Don't forget that expert work is done
fate, In ' repairing and finishing old
Fnrnlture ; also In making odd pieces to
order, and reproducing antique styles.
' Liberal terms to all and big discount
tor, cash.
i. Every Day Is Bargain Day with us.
S. A Kingman,
164 and 156 Grand St.
0ONT MISS
SEEING THE DISPLAY
; of the ,
-LATE8T FALL 8TYLE8 OF
.O
HATS
AT THE
Danbury Hat Store
219 BANK ST.
Utesa comprise the Leaders YEO
' MANS, DUNLAP and YOUNG
at ROCK BOTTOM PRICES.
-Stylish Hats from $1-40 Up
The $1.40 Hat Is the one" usually sold at
' ; 2 and 82.50.
' ' Come and see for yourself.
DANBURY HAT CO.,
219 Bank St.
PENMANSHIP.
PROF MOLLEY
- -Teaches every pupil to write a line,
rmpid, business band in a course of
Sixteen Private Lessons and no fall
crM. .All kinds of pen work executed
lis the highest degree of the art.
" r "' ' " 167 Bank St.
i
TKKM8 OF SUBSCRIPTION.
ONE COrY, Olio Yonr 5 00
Six Months 2.o
Olio Month a
ADVERTISING RATES.
Display advertising 7 oonts per inch, first
insertion; half prioo for oai'h subsequent
insertion. Uradins notioes 18 to 28 cen's a
line. Huhoflulo of rates for lonpr term ndvor
tisine sont on applloation. Amusomanb au
urt jsoments $1 per inch, one time ; hult price
for (men subsequent insertion.
C. Maxoney. Editor and Proprietor.
Girls at the awkward age, which is
difficult to date but which every mother
knows So well, should he dressed very
carefully, so as not to loolt all legs and
feet, and be at a loss to know what to
do with their-hands. For certain types
a quaint and picturesque style is ef
fective, while for others severest sim
plicity is the most successful method ol
gowning. Every child should be stud
ied. Her age, her manner, her walk,
her complexion, eyes, hair and figure
should be taken into account, if her
mother desires her gowned so as to
cover personal defects or enhance her
good points. And the game is well
worth the candle, as children are ef
fected in their manners, speech and
disposition by the clothes they wear, a
fact easily proven by noting the airs a
child assumes when he or she is con
scious of being well dressed. A nw'
The greatest financial genius of the
Rothschild family, though there have
been many of great talent, was Na
than Mayer, of the second generation,
who established the house of N. M.
Rothschild & Co., in 1798, in London.
He flew to the stars and grovelled in
the mud for money. He welcomed all
transactions, big or little, wherewith
to turn the banker's penny. He was
the most daring speculator of his time
on the stock exchange, and the most
successful. He had carrier pigeons
and fast sailing boats to bring him the
earliest news from the war centers of
Europe, and so help him to manipulate
stocks. He followed Wellington's army
to "Waterloo in person and had re
lays of swiftest horses and a fast
yacht lying in the harbor at Ostend.
So he arrived at the London stock ex
change after the battle twelve hours
ahead of any public announcement of
the victory, and made $25,000,000 by
one of the most tremendous series cl
speculations in history. In 1810, when
the Duke of Wellington, then com
manding in Spain, drew on the English
government for $15,000,000, and the
English treasury was short, Nathan
bought the drafts at a big discount and
at once sent the money. The stories
about this remarkable man are almost
endless and show how strangely he
was alike equal to the most tremen
dous schemes and the pettiest tricks
of avarice. ' .
The standard maxim of the electri
cian, "never touch a wire; it may be
dead, but if it ain't, you may be," 1e
generally followed, so far as actually
touching the wire with the hand is
concerned; but several recent acci
dents have taught the public that they
must be Just as careful to avoid con
tact between electric wires, and any
conducting materia) held In the hand.
Not long ago a mechanical engineer
who was Inspecting the third rail sys
tem at Hartford, accidentally touched
the conductor with his umbrella, which
had a steel rod. The umbrella was
badly burned, and its owner had a les
son in electrical conductivity that he
will not soon forget. A similar inci
dent is reported from a New Jersey
town. Two brothers, standing arm
in arm, were looking in a window,
while one held an umbrella. He raised
it a little, and as the steel tip came
in contact with an arc light wire above
a shock was received that knocked
both men over. In another accident,
the issue was fatal. A man carrying
a steel rod umbrella, touched a live
wire, which was lying almost out ot
sight near the edge of the pavement.
He was instantly killed. His hand was
burned to a crisp, and there were liv
id marks all over his body. The um
brella had transmitted the full pow
of an electric lighting circuit.' '
ARTIFICIAL
TEETH! TEETH II TEETH II I
only $7.5 0
' For the very best that can
be made.
A 3 Years Warrant
With Every Set.
(This offer holds for a limited time.)
.- o . I
Dr. J. W. Mahony,
yDElsTXIST;
Comer Bank and Grand Sts-
THE ACME.
Do you want a squire deal?
Buy of U3 and you get it
. . . . every time.
Choicest of Fresh and Cured
Meats, Poultry, Vegetables,
Groceries and Provisions.
None of them cm tou'.h us
In prices. Come and see.
L. P. & A. H. GUILFOIUL
Just Over the Bridce in Brooklyn.
He Kacaped.
A bishop of the Methodist church
was preaching a sermon on the vanity
of dress, and Incidentally alluded to
people who wore velvet and gold orna
ments.
After the sermon a distinguished
member of his conference approached
him and said: "Now bishop, I know
you were striking at me, for I have a
velvet vest and a heavy watch chain."
The bishop smiled, passed his hand
over the vest, touched the chain, and
then said, with a merry twinkle in his
eye: "No, really, Brother B., for the
vest you wear is only a cotton velvet
and I am half persuaded that your
watch chain is bras." Atlanta Constitution.
DIFFERENCE IN EGGS.
TOLD IN A PARAGRAPH.
It is Mostly Found In tho "Whites Which
Are Watery.
There are rich eggs and poor cgg3, 1
though many do not recognize the fact,
and think the question of quality de- ,
pends only on whether an egg is fresh
or stale. The yolk is a nearly con
stant quality in all eggs. It is in the
whites of eggs that the difference is
mostly seen. In a rich egg the albu
men is so abundant that when it is
put Into hot water, the white of the egg
will contract closely around the yoke.
In a poor egg it will spread more, with
watery veins running through it that 1
are not albumenized. It is the differ-
ence in feeding and also in the condi-.
tion of the hen that makes this varla- I
tion in their quality. As hot weather '
begins, the hens are exhausted with !
the labor of producing an egg a day i
for weeks or perhaps months. They
then eat too much grass for their own!
good But the egg is in the ovum and i
the hen does her best to make the egg
with such material as she has. OI
course the quality is inferior, but the
hen is not to blame. She should have
some grain even in summer, lessening
the quantity,, so as not to fatten her.
Almost everybody has noticed that
eggs don't taste so good after they
get cheap as they do in winter and
early spring. They are really less nu
tritious. It is these eggs of inferior
quality that are mostly put up for win
ter use by packers. Is it any wonder
that no matter how well preserved the
limed eggs may be, its quality in win
ter will be inferior? It is an inferior
egg to begin with, and certainly keep
ing it eight or ten months ha3 not im
proved it. , In proportion as there is
more water and less albument in the
white of eggs, their loss in weight
through evaporation must be greater.
Both the white and the yolk of the
egg furnish the material for the young
chick. The imperfect albumenization
of the white of eggs In fowls whose
feed is largely grass or which are out
of condition from any cause, is the se
cret of so many weakly chicks during
hot weather. Yet it is not tho weather
alone that makes the difference, for in
the very hottest season of the year,
which comes in the wheat harvest, hens
that can get at this grain grow bright
combed and vigorous, and hatch in Au
gust broodj of strong, healthy chicks
that will make tho earliest spring lay
ers. ' The reason is that the hen, keep
ing around the barn and the wheat
fields, picks up enough wheat to fur
nish albumen for every egg she pro
duces. There is very nearly as much albu
men in the yolk of the egg, but it is
combined with other material. It is
in the yolk that the germ of the young
chick is found and the first nutriment
is derived. Therefore the germination
of the egg up to a certain period 13
pretty sure unless the egg is chilled
and the germ is killed. But however
warm the eggs are kept, if the white
of the egg is very deficient the chick
will either die in its snell or will be
hatched , such a weakling that it will
not be worth raising. It is quite prob
able that the final make-up of the chick
depends upon the amount of albumen
In the white of the egg. American Cul
tivator. '
Classifying Plants ns to Care.
It needs only a few rules to grow
nearly all plants, if we can mentally
place each one In a class with many
others. There are the hard wooded,
and the soft wooded, each class requir
ing different treatment; there are the
heat lovers, and those which refuse to
thrive except in a cool temperature;
there are sun lovers, and shade lovers;
there are mosture lovers, and those
which have no delight except in
drought: Most of the hard wooded
plants require somewhat similar treat
ment. By learning this, by placing the
eun lovers in the south windows, the
shade lovers in an apropriate place,
and by making certain that the plants
which delight in moisture shall have
plenty of it, the plant problems are
mainly solved in a general way. ,
Overestlmulatlou. What is It?
In the effort to obtain the greatest
possible number of eggs in the year, a
great difficulty presents itself. An ex
cessive number of eggs can scarcely be
produced without forcing. A "balanced
ration" for eggs often proves just the
ration to unbalance the fowls, as re
gards her digestive apparatus. The
moment this becomes true, it may be
known that there has been an over
stimulation. And for this, long con
tinued, there is no remedy but the hat
chet. The most successfa lpoultry man
is he who so balances his feed as to
produce first, thrift; after that poultry
products of the various sorts which he
wishes to sell. For fowls in confine
ment, tho greatest dangers lie in the
way of overfeeding heavy grains and
meat.
No need to fear the approach of
croup if you have Dr Thomas' Eclec
tric Oil in the house. Never was a
case that it wouldn't cure if used at
the outset.
"I have nothing in the store that
sells so well or gives such general sat
isfaction as Dr Fowler's Extract of
Wild Strawberry. I always recom
mend it in cases of summer complaint
or bowel trouble of any kind." C. A.
West, RainBborough, 0.
The secret of happiness, "Keep your
liver right." Burdock Blood Bitters
Is nature's remedy for complaints of
the liver or bowels.
All those creeping, crawling, sting
ing sensations that combine to make
up the tortures of any itching disease
of the skin are instantly relieved and
permanently cured by Doan's Oint
ment. Take no substitute. Doan's
never fails.
Ansel's Wines.
According to one catalogue, the own
er of the plant rejoicing in this taking
name need never speak of angels with
out seeing the flutter of their wings.
Inasmuch as It is said to be always in
bloom. The plaut is rather bright,
slight t resembling a Bougainvillea.
The Individual flowers are of the ir
regular labiate form, growing singly in
the axils of the leaves. They are of a
rather dull crimson in color. With
only here and there a bloom, the plant
is not particularly showy. But if well
covered with bloom, it may prove quite
attractive, especially in winter, when
red blossoms brighten up the window
so much. Its more stately name is
Beloperone.
Wide ts. Narrow Tires.
Elaborate tests of the draft of wide
and narrow tired wagons have just
been completed by the Missouri Agri
cultural college experiment station, Co
lumbia, extending over a period of a
year and a half. These tests have
been made orf"1 macadam, grave and
dirt roads in all conditions, and also
on the meadows and plowed fields of
the experimental farm. Contrary to
public expectation, m nearly all cases
draft was materially lighter when tires
eix inches wide were used, than with
tires of standard width. The load
hauled was In all cases the same, and
the draft was most carefully determin
ed by means of a self-recording dyna
A golf club now has possession ol
Shakespeare's birthplace.
In Now Scotland Yard, London, 3.000
police officers can be accommodated.
The most expensive stamps for col
lectors are those of Mauritius and Ha
waii. The St. Louis Methodist conference
has voted in favor of the admission of
women.
The German Emperor has now four
sons who hold commissions in the Prus
sian army.
The Queen Regent of Holland has ap
pointed a permanent commission to
codify the international private law.
A Russian actress named Orlow has
just taken part in a charity perform
ance at Ostakov, although 90 years o
age.
Philadelphia has a greater mileage of
electric railways than the whole of Ger
nany, according to the Electrical
World.
If England now had a Byron or
America a Fitz-Groene Halleck, King
George of Greece might have a better
chance for immortality.
Kansas farmers have a portable nar
row guage railroad which can be taken
up and laid down at the rate of five
miles a day, no grading being required.
A giant sewing machine has been fin
ished at Leeds, England. The machine
which is to be used for attaching cot
ton belting, weighs five and a quarter
tons.
A ton of lead is fired for every man
killed in battle. Statistics of European
wars show that from 3,"000 to 10,000
shots are fired for every person dis
abled. The temperance society of an Ohio
town recently purchased the only sa
loon in the town limits and burned all
of the fixtures with appropriate cere
monies. Japanese officers who fought in the
late war against China have petitioned
their government to erect a monument
to the memory of the horses that fell
in battle.
Nearly 200 guineas have been sub
scribed to the fund for a bust of the
late Lord Randolph Churchhill to be
placed In the precincts of the House of
Commons.
No one can blame the preacher for
getting mad when his Sunday text,
"Tho Immortality of Love," appeared
in print with the first "ty omitted in
immortality.
The man who invented the cone
shaped glass lemon squeezer made 50,
000 out of it, and was lately offered
1100,000 for four other inventions of
the same simple and practical kind.
In the first daily newspaper, started
in London in 1703, the editor announced
that he would not bother his readers
with editorials notes, because readers
were all wise enough to make their own
reflections.
An ordinary man can say everything
than any occasion calls for with a vo
cabulary of 1,000 words. Of these he
uses only 400 or 500, using tho remain
der when an Idea out of the usual line
of thought occurs to him. 1
When a person falls into the water
a common felt hat may be made use of
as a life preserver. By placing the hat
upon the water, rim down, with the
arm around it, pressing It slightly to
the breast, it will bear a man up foi
hours.
The author of "The Fall of the Congo
'rabs" declares that, in spite of the
Belgian successess, civilization on the
Congo has scarcely made the faintest
beginning. In the Congo territories
cannibalism is prevalent to an extent
unimagined in the West.
When the sultan wants to see a play
he sends out for a company and attends
the representation In his dining room.
Before the performance he hands the
manager some original jokes of his own
to be added to the dialogue,' so the
troupe is at least sure of one apprecia
tive listener.
Of all the athletic exercises, with per
haps the single exception of football,
the very best is digging, says a doctor.
Every muscle, vein artery and nerve in
the body is worked in the process.
There is no aid to digestion, np recipe
for a good night's sleety, to match an
hour at honest digging once or twice a
day.
A curious plan for catching fish Is
used on the Columbia river out west. A
number of wheels are set up in the mid
dle ot the stream, which, as they turn
round, catch up the fish and oast them
into troughs by the river banks. The
salmon are then tinned and sent all
over the world. As much as five tons'
weight of fish a day has thus been
taken.
The Greek is a great reader of news
papers. At present 152 newspapers are
published in Greece, with an aggregate
circulation of 175,000. CThe political
Journals number 82; literary, 12; com
mercial, 6; scientific, 28; satirical, '6;
legal, 6, and medical, 2. Newspapers
are to be found in almost every town
In Peloponnesus, the mainland and tho
Islands.
An actress in Stockholm lost her
power of speech and memory througb
sudden grief, and could not take her
part. She was accordingly hypnotized,
and the operator having suggested thai
she should proceed to the theatre and
go through her part, she did so quite
unconsciously, and in such a natural
manner that the audience remained in
ignorance of what had taken place.
Santa Rosa, capital of Santa Rosa,
county, Cal., has a Baptist church,
which holds over 200 people, built en
tirely from timber sawn out of a single
redwood. Timbers, weather boarding
and inner lining are all of wood, there
being no plastor or brinks and mortar
about it. The roofing, too, is of
shingles .cut from the same tree, and
after it was all finished, there were 60,-
000 shingles left.
New York has a new women's club
with 400 members, each one of whom Is
employed in some branch of domestic
service. There are cooks and laund
resses and waitresses and scullery
maids, but the majority are general
houseworkers In families In moderate
circumstances. The club meets twice a
month, and has a home completely fur
nished for domesttc servants who are
ill, out of employment or superannu
AT JACQUES OPERA HOUSE. I
One night only,
Thursday, sept 23.
"VTEW YORK AND NEW ENQ-
LAND RAILROAD.
THOMAS H. DAVIS nl WM T. REQG'S
Enormous Success, the Realistic
aud Sensational Oomedv Drama
THE SIDEWALKS ol IEV YORK
A Picturesque aud Pictorial Reflex
of Life on the Streets of the
Great Metropolis.
A World of Comedy and Novelties.
SOUL STIRRING SENSATIONS
AND SCENIC SPLENDORS
PAUL J. TUSTIN'S
Death-Defying Act of Heroism.
A headlong dive of fifty feet iuto a Tank
of water only three feet deep.
The Great Aeiald Squa e Scene.
A Masterpiece ot Senic Art.
AT JACQUES OPERA HOUSE.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24.
ENGAGEMENT OF
HENRY niLLER
In the New Romantic Coined v,
HEARTSEASE,
Under Direction of
MR CHARLES FliOlIMAM,
Direct from the Garden Theatre, New
York, where it had a run of over
100 nights last season.
HEARTSEASE
Will be presented with entirely New
Scenery, Rich Costumes, Elegant
Stage Furnishings and tho
Original Music.
A SUPPORTING COMPANX OF EX
CEPTIONAL EXCELLENCE.
AT JACQUES OPERA ( HOUSE.
One Night Only.
SATURDAY, SEPT, 25th.
None In existence can follow
BOSTON'S NEXT MAYOR,
JOHN L. SULLIVAN'S
COMEDY AND
BIG VAUDEVILLE CO.
Pleaures oh the Ocean
Splendid Scenery. The Grand
Gymnasium Scene. Au Outfit.
They si and without an equsl
JOHN L. with Sparring Partner at each
and every performance.
Lakewood Park.
WATEBBUBY'S BEAUTIFUL
OUTING PLACE.
Music every Sunday afternoon.
Routing, Bowling, Fishing.
AU Summer Amusements.
Boulder
Grove - -
NEAREST AND BEST
PLEA8URE RESORT
Take Naugatuck Trolley.
NOTICE.
The partnership hitherto existing be
tween George T. Lake and Chris Strobel
and transacting business in Wntcrbury,
Conn, under the firm name of Lake &
Strobel, has been dissolved by mutual
conseut. George T.Lake ceases to be
connected with said business hereafter
and the same will be conducted by Chris
Strobel, who Is authorized to collect all
claims due the foiuier partnership and
ftp continue business under the old firm
name of Lake & Strobel.
GEORGE T. LAKE,
CHRIS STROBEL.
Dated Sept ISth, 1897.
THE GREAT BREAD PRODUCER
j The following first-class grocers sell It'
WATMBBUHY, CONN.
M. J. Fogg, C. E. Torrance
H. W. Foolj, N. W. Heater
F. K. Case, W. C. Hall
F. S. Douglass, W. Wilson
W. N. Ladd, JlacKerracher Bros
W. Brickie, T. Kilina.rUn
P. Thomas, M. Blanchette
J. P. McCarthy, T. O'Rourke
T. M. Creuss, E. J. Sullivan
W. N. Vallee, I. Elbert
M. La.ll.1ere, "j o. Lafrandere
O. F. Cardinal. " r. J. Phelan
Delaney & Condon. M. G-allag-an
Brooklyn Co-orveraitve Co.
NAUGATUCK, CONN.
G. Ackerman. p. O'Connor
J. O. Sullivan, J. rrnovan
Naugatuck Co-Op C", E. J. Conway
M. Horn.
UNION CITT, CONN. -
J. J. LJnskey.
WATERTOWN, CONN.
J. J. Kellty.
TOHRINOTON, CONN.
IJ. T. Tra.sk & Co.
SOTJTIIFORr. CONN.
V. Davis & Son.
Price nc more than the "just a
good." All first class grocers sell it.
THE F. C. BUSHNEL CO.
Passenger Train Service, June 13.
Trains leave Waterbury for
EOSTON and WORCESTER 7 a. m.;
12:35, 4:05 p. m. (via Hartford and
Springfield). Return, 8:32 a. m.. 1:00
p. m. (Park Squam station).
PUTNAM 7:00, 8:35 a. m.; 12:35,
1:C5, S:02 p. m.
PROVIDENCE, NORWICH, NEW
LONDON and WILLIMANTIC 7 a.
m.; 12:35, 4:05 p. m.
ROCKVILLE 7, 8:35 a. m.; 12.35,
4:05, 8:02 p. m.
HARTFORD. NEW BRITAIN. MID
DLETOWN, MERIDEN, PLAIN
VI LEE, BRISTOL and TERRY
VILLE 7, 8:35, 11 a. m.; 12: S5, 4:05,
8:02 p. m.
WATERVILLE 7, 8:85, 11 a. m.; 1:05,
8:02 p: m.
TOWANTIC 8:05 a. m.; 4:05 p. m.
SOUTHFORD, POMPERAUG VAL
LEY, SANDY HOOK, HAWLEY
VILLE, DANBURY 8:05 a. m.;
1:50, 5:45 p. m.
BREWSTERS, POUOHKEEPSIE,
NEW YORK, FISHKILL LAND
ING, NEWBURG, ALBANY. SYRA
CUSE, BUFFALO, CINCINNATI,
ST LOUIS and CHICAGO and all
points West and South 8:05 a. m.,
1:50 p. m.
SUNDAY Hartford and way stations
8:30 a. m., connects for Springfield,
Boston and Montreal; 5:10 p. m.
W. R. BABCOCK.
General Passenger Agent, Boston.
Trains leave and arrive at Boston,
Old CoIotiv station. Plymouth division,
"N. Y., N. II. & H. R. R., Kneeland
Street.
Tickets on sale to ail principal points
in the United States, Canada and Mex
ico. Also summer excursion tickets to
points in Maine, Nova Scotia and New
Brunswick via Boston, Montreal and
Quebec. For tickets, rates and fall in
formation, call on A. E. VEAZEY,
Ticket Agent, New England Passenger
Station, Waterbury.
New York, New fam & Hirifcrd 11
Naugatuck Division. June 13. 1897.
Trains Leave Waterbury as Follows:
FOR NEW YORK 6:35, 8:12, 10:50 a.
m.; 1:28, 2:53, 6:08 p. m.; Sunday,
7:15 a. m., 5:25 p. m.
Return, 5:00, 8:00,. 10:03 o. m.; 1:02,
4:02, 6:00 p. m.; Sunday, C:00 a. in.,
5 p.m.
FOR NEW HAVEN (via Derby Junc
tion) 6:35, 8:12, 10:50 a. m.; 1:28-
2:63, 4:45, 6:00 p. m.
Return (via Derby Junction), 7:00,
8:00, 9:35 a. m.; 12:00,-2:39, 5:35,
7:50 p. m.; Sunday, 8:10 a. m., 6:15
p. m. (via Naugatuck Junction.
FOR BRIDGEPORT 6:35, 8:12, 10:50
a. m.; .1:28, 2:53, 6:08 p. m.; Sunday
7:15 a. m., 5:25 p. m.
Return, 7:10. 9:40 a. m.; 12:00, 2:35,
5:35, 7:40 p. m.; Sunday, 8 :15 a. m.,
6:30 p. m.
FOR ANSONIA 6:35, 8:12, 10:50 a.
m.; 1.28, 2:53, 4:. 6:08, 7:00
(mixed) p. m.;' Sunday, 7:15 a. m.,
5:25 p. m.
Return, 7:45, 8:23, 10:21 a. m.; 12:31,
3:10, 6:13, 8:20 p. m.; Sunday, 8:46
a. m., 7:02 p. m.
FOR WATERTOWN 6:45, 8:38, 11:17
a. m.; 1:30, 4:00, 5:00, '6:12. 7:03.
9:05, 10:00 p. m.; Sunday, 9:30 a.m.,
7:45 p. m.
Return, 6:08, 7:40, 10:20 a. m.; 12:45,
2:20, 4:20, 50, 6:30, 7:35, 9:35 p. m.;
Sunday, 6:45 a. m., 4:55 p. m.
FOR THOMASTON 8 : 33, 11:12 a. m.;
3:55, 6:58, 9:00 p. m.; Sunday, 9:25
a. m., 7:40 p. m.
Return, 6:08, 7:45, 10:23 a. m.; 2:25,
5:41 p. m.; Sunday, 6:47 a. m., 4:57
p. m.
FOR TORRINGTON 8:33, 11:12 a,
m.; 3:55, 6:58, 9:00 p. m.; Sunday,
9:25 a. m., 7:40 p. m.
FOR WINSTED 8:33, 11:12 a. m.;
3:55. 6:58, 9:00 p. m.; Sunday, 9:25
a. m., 7:40 p. m.
Return, 5:30, 7:00, 9:40 a. m.; 1:45,
4:55 p. m.; Sunday, 6:05 a. m., 4:10
p. m.
C T. HEMPSTEAD, Gen Pass Agt.
Bridgeport Steamboat Co.
FAST STEAMER SERVICE BE
TWEEN BRIDGEPORT ' : AND
NEW YORK. LONG ISLAND
SOUND BY DAYLIGHT.
STEAMER ROSEDALE Will Leave
Bridgeport at 7:45 a. m. daily
' (Sunday excepted) on arrival of
6:35 a. m. train on tho Naugatuck
Division from Waterbury and in
termediate stations, arriving in
New York at 11 a. m.
Returning Leaves New York, Pier
39 E. R. (foot market street) at 3
p. m., connecting at Bridgeport
with train leaving at 7:40 p. m. for
Waterbury and intermediate sta
tions. Saturdays Leave Pier 39 E. R. at 2
p. m. and East 31st street at 2:15
P' m SUNDAY SERVICE. '
Commencing Sunday, 'June 13th and
continuing until Sunday, Septem
ber 26th (inculsive), leaves Bridge
port at 9 a. m., on arrival Sunday
morning train from all stations on
the Naugatuck division.
Returning Leave New York at 5
p. m.
STEAMER NUTMEG STATE Leaves
Bridgeport every night (except
Saturday) at 12 o'clock midnight.
Returning, leaves New York every
day (except Sunday) at 11 n. m.,
from Pier 39 E. R., connecting at
Bridgeport with train leaving at
5:30 p. m. for all stations on Naug
atuck division.
F. H. CONNELLY, Supt.
So'e Millers' Agents.
WATERBURY HACK CO
The first aud only Company in thecity
with Kubbor-U ire Co:u-1iks ; best iu the
city t'OMchnian in full livery for Fu
r.efiiVs, Weddings, Christenings and
Kidins Parties.
Ma'iv Office District Tel Office.
M Ai-.i.KS Cor Ann and Gilbert streets
I T. F. LUNNY, Proorie'rcr-.
Opening Week.
This week finds nwit'i a comple'e
new stcck of fall inid Winter t lothin.
New goods in every Tne lias been arriv
ing iitour store for the last 3 w eUs, hut
with the beginning ot this week o ir
entire stock is now tojipUte wl.ich
means that everv style worn this tall
can now be seen to advantage.
Hen's Suits.
In sacks, Vratghtcut and cutan-oys:
"loung Men's. Suits iu all the popular
fabric., Fall and Wiuter Oversou g, i
every cut and at every price, t hildren's'
Suits aud Reefers, that will uiake thl
little ones feel bright aud happy. Ladiw?
aud Misses' Capes and Jackets iu ill he
New York Fall styles, every article in
our store, from the cheapest to 1 he bet
is sold Ou Credit. - o-
Credit Clothing Co
62 BANK STREET. "'"
Naugatuck Office in Hop&ou's Bloc "
::UMBRELLAS:
We Sell Exclusively our -V
own Make. ,
A great change to oil. It will save you
money by buying Umbrellas cfthp.
Manufactory, where you can," : ,
the get ti e best goods tot ;f;
least money iii the cty. , -f 1
UMBAELLAS AND
BABY :: GARRIf Q r
PARASOLS:-"
WITH THE BEST u;
:-: GLORIA SILK-:-:
For $1.25, Worfc$
Guaranteed for good 'Variety!'-If not,
satisfactory may bo returhel.
5gp Tinsting to reoeive'a eti from
you which you will never regriff. . '--
5. FRIEDHAN,
217 HANK S REET,
Open Evenings uutil 9 JO.
Frank Miller & Go,
COAL.
U SOUTH MAIN STREET.
Waterbury Fife Alarm.
LOCATION OF BOXES."
12 Rogers & Bro. - ' "n :' "f
13 Cor East .Main and Niagara
streets. -.' '' '
14 East Main and Wolcott road.
15 Cor High and Walnut streets."
16 Cor East Main and Cherry BtreeU.
17 cor East Main and Cole street.
21 Cor North Elm and i Kingsbury
streets. -i '-. -r-
23 Cor North Elm, North Mala ftad
Grove streets.
24 Waterbury Manufacturing Oo -(private).
- '
ic h.Tnrth Main and . North
streets.
26 Cor Buckingham '. and Cooke-:
streets. .
27 Cor Grove and Prospect streets. .
28 Cor Hillside avenue and 1 Fine
29 Cor Johnson and JftfteryiUe
212 The Piatt Bros & Co (private V ; ;
214 Waterbury Clock Co Movement -
. AKir nrivntAl :" -V '"'?t
251 Cor Round Hill and Ward street.,
252 Cor Baldwin and Rye streets. -3
Exchange place. ?
31-Cor Bank and Grand street
ijur " tow v ,
ctrggtS t
34-'-Cor West Main and WatertoW
35 Traction Co's Stables (private). ;
nc -nrotorhnrv Brass Co (privam;.
37Cor Cedar and Meadow streets. -8
Cor Grand and Field streeUj. v;
311-Southern New England Telepjw,
(private). . .
312-Cor Bank and Meadow evre,-.
313 Randoipn '-iVVteV
314 Plume & Atwood Co .tprlvate ,.
orAmerican Ring Co (private).
Vie Fiectric Light Station (private).
lls-HoTmes, Bolth & Haydens (pri-.,
vato). '.
o2i No 4 Hose House.
323-Cor Washington and West Porter
streei?- ,-,tr Btrat.-"
"r-ui Zrl Z"rt nd Washington
,YZ Lor Diiuuu
uvfnnp. .
4 Cor South Main and Grand streets
.1?E Min and Clay streets.,
43-Waterbury Watch Co ipmawj.
45 Benedict fc Burnham Co.tpri-
' .,,- nnrkle Co (nrivatc): 1
An y-i Crt-ttn ftinill tlUU WtWUlURiyU
H tUl uuui" . r- ., .
streets.
412 Tracv Bros and others (private),
5ScoviU Maauiacturing Co , ( private).
r'i. tor r riiuJ'" "
r, waterbury Clock Caae factory
(private). -
r4 Cor Clay and Mill streets. . - . ,
'njg cor Liberty and River street.. 1
jj7 No 5 Hose House. -f
5 oor l.aiowm ana fetone streets c IZ
6 Cor Bridge and Magill Etreets.--
C2 Cor Doolittlc alley rrd Dnblltl
, st recta. -' -

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