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Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury, Conn.) 1897-1900, October 20, 1899, Image 14

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ELLA WHEELER WILCOX'S SUNDAY SERMON.
Autumn is the Time to Think
and Been -Wicked This
pent at
ant Women who Have Flirted
Summer can now Ke-Lcisure.
THE ERA" OF STREAMERS HAS ARRIVED AND YOU SEE THEM OF.
ALL DESCRIPTIONS FROM HEAVY VELVET TO THE LIGHTEST.
OF TULLE. CHIFFON AND VEILING.
AND NOW COME
THE WINTER. HATS.
Many are Made ofChenille Trimmed
With Velvet Eoses Giving a Cur
ious likeness to Summer
. '" ' Headgear.
VIEW -0OARIOI0DELS.
Velvet and Feathers are Used Liber
ally and High. Trimmings Continue
" . ; , ; to be the Vogue.
NOVELTIES H SHAPE AXD COLOB,
New Tork, Oct. 20. Hats are still the
absorbing topic of dress, for with the
I mall jacket and the quiet skirt of fall,
a woman must depend for the elegance
of her toUette upon the mode of her hat
and the neatness of her boots and
gloves.
"Well hatted Is well dressed," Is a
French proverb almost trite, yet ever
true. 1
The hats I can show you this week
are mostly French .hats; for the Paris
milliners have been generous with
their models this season. The newest
is the Alsaclenne, which Is pretty
viewed en profile, or full face. It is
made of cloth and velvet of two shades,
put together so that the velvet bow is
In front, set broadly over the face, so
that the knot of velvet comes just over
the eyebnw and the broad loops are
pulled out to frame the face. The
cloth is brought from the back of the
hat forward to a point under the bow,
. and ' thus the hat is trimmed. Its
frame may be a last summer's straw,
for all that it will show, though there
are pretty felt hats that turn up at
the front for the Alsacienne trimming,
FRENCH HATS.
- - Another French hat is the Versailles,
which is a modified English walking
hat. deep in the front and abrupt In the
-back. The front brim takes a very low
' cSip, thus securing that droop which is
becoming to most faces; the classic
droop, the- London ladies' hatters call
It- The crown of this hat is a beaver
t K r 7 III
- ill i t ii
Ill - WJkn w.
iW .ill m - -aw-BjSaM ill
111 l : . . T ITS. III . 1 1
V -A WOMAN OF MUCH CHARACTER. AND HAS BEEN OF
TAT ASSISTANCE TO HE R HUSBAND IN HIS WORK.
entirely untrimmed, and at the front
there is a big twist of ribbon velvet
securing two very large bird wings In
place. That is the style recommended
to home milliners.
A style for which we are Indebted to
the London hatters is the Albert Ed
ward. It is a felt hat with crown set
deep in the brim, making a fold around
the crown. In this fold there nestles a
roll of velvet which emerges on top in
a big soft knot. Three large ostrich
feathers come from under the knot of
velvet; another simple style to Imi
tate. This hat is to be worn back
from the forehead, which may be
dressed a la parte or a la pompadour.
A novelty in hats is the clover hat,
which is a small toque, of the most di
minutive proportions imaginable. The
front of the hat is treated to four -large
loops of silk, well wired and fixed up
right, in a way to imitate a four leaf
clover. The colors may be any of the
new greens and the center veins in the
leaves are imitated in white floss. Or
the loops may be wired and used with
out veining.
There is always a poke hat. Each
season sees its novelty in pokes, and
this year is no exception. The poke of
'99 consists primarily of a hat with
crown and protruding front brim. The
brim is trimmed to suit the vagaries
of fashion. This year it is quite won
derful in its construction. At least
three yards of silk is cut on the bias
into strips half a yard wide; these are
stiffened with crinoline and the edges
turned over in such a way as to hide
the lining, and blind stitched.
MAKING A HAT.
The whole is now secured upon the
front of the hat in a most remarkable
way. Taking the two strips of silk,
which, it is supposed, have been made
into equal lengths, half a yard wide.
The ends are sewed fast to the hat at
opposite sides. They are then brought
forward and tied loosely into an im
mense bow. The loops are pulled out
and are tacked to the sides of the hat
and the ends are flared as much as
possible. This fashion, while conspic
uous, is rather pretty worn by a fresh
young face. '
In spite of the growing agitation to
prevent the use of birds upon hats,
they are worn more than ever, and
scarcely a piece of mUUnery but sports
them.
The writer happened to stand In the
hat department of a large store the
.VELVET FLOWERS ARE VERT FASHIONABLE, AND SO ARE
- BUNCHES OF VELVET, IN FACT, VELVET IS THE MATERIAL OF
THE TEAR. ,
other ''ay , when a very fashionably
dressed - -young , woman entered, and
walking up to a saleslady asked for a
hat "without- live bird feathers."
The saleswoman brought out a round
hat profusely trimmed with dove
breasts which were curved around the
crown and carried almost to the back
of the hat. In front stood a Paradise
plume.
The young lady took the hat, exam
ined the feathers minutely and to my
surprise -purchased the hat, paying a
handsome price for it.
THE TRADE BIRD.
After she went out the saleswoman
explained to me that the dove breasts
were all manufactured article, and
were made from the tiny feathers
which the birds shed at moulting time.
They are gathered and fastened with
infinite patience upon a foundation of
linen of the same cojor, which is
stuffed to simulate the shape of the
breast of a dove. The paradise feath
ers were slender feathery grasses,
dyed. In this way the young woman
satisfied her conscience and preserved
her style.
The fancy la getting back toward
the darker colored hat for winter. Tou
see more black hats, but in these som
bre pieces of millinery there sets a
rose, or a feather, or a knot of velvet
to relieve the mature look which an
all-black hat inevitably carries with it.
The milliners are indebted to the
modistes for their hat materials, for
hats are trimmed with the stuff of the
dresses. The modiste must preserve a
yard or so of goods for the milliner to
take and transform into crown, or
bow, or brim trimming. Thus the hat
matches the gown and becomes part
of the dress scheme; and money is
saved for the wearer who utilizes dress
material in place of the more expen
sive hat silk and velvet.
Winter gowns are necessarily so
much quieter than summer modes
with their frills and furbelows that
one can well pay attention to one's
hat, HELEN WARD.
(THE SHAMROCK HAT CONSISTS OF FOUR CURIOUS LEAVES SET
WELL FRONT OVER A SPREADING CROWN; THE ROSE HAT IS
IN VELVET AND THE ORCHID HAT IS IN STRIPED- SILK.
ARTISTIC WORK FOR DEFT FINGERS.
Venetian Work can be Carried oat in Simple Designs for
House Decoration.
It is to tlie skillful fingers of the Ve
netians that we are indebted for this
exquisitely dainty . and artistic work,
which is within the capacity of old and
young, and requires but patience and
practice to become proficient.
Bent Iron work is one of the most
effective features of the present style
of house furnishings, being employed
for grills, hanging lamps, hanging
vases, shades, easels, brackets, fenders,
picture frames, candelabra and candle
sticks. When purchased in "the shops
these articles are expensive and be
yond the reach of women with artistic
fancies but limited purse, and as these
women are very largely in the major
ity, the bent iron work will be a valua
ble assistant, as the materials em
ployed are both simple and inexpen
sive; in fact, many of them can be
found in the ordinary tool chest with
which every well regulated house is
supplied.
Although the work affords many pos
sibilities for those of an artistic turn
of mind. In that original designs are
always advantageous and a touch of
individuality always appreciated, yet
for those who find it impossible so to
create, patterns of almost any desired
design may be procured at a nominal
rate. These patterns, by the by, are
most complete, being full size, and with
the 'measurement for - each curve ac
curately given, -thus entailing little or
no trouble on the part of the worker.
- The narrow strips of iron used in
making the designs are very pliable,
and may to bent, curved or twisted
THE WORKING WIFE
OF DR. PARKHURST.
She Sees Callers for her Husband,
and Answers his Appeals for
Charity.
I asked Dr. Parkhurst, the day he
landed from Europe, how soon he would
begin work. And he replied:
"Immediately. I am stronger than
ever for the fight on the same old
lines."
Behind him stood Mrs. Parkhurst,
nodding approval.
Very few even among the Doctor's
parishioners, know how active his wife
is in the work of reform, or how much
assistance she gives her husband.
Mrs. Parkhurst has her distinct lines
of help in the Doctor's work, and if
she were to be ill, or leave her place
for a few days, it would be hard to
get along without her.
The first duty in the Parkhurst home
is the answering of the door-bell. This
rings about one hundred times a day.
Sometimes, when there has been a
specially important move, oftener.
There are but two maids kept in the
Parkhurst household; and, frequently,
the lady of the house herself answers
the summons when the maids are un
avoidably elsewhere.
All callers see Mrs. Parkhurst, un
less they can show a letter from the
with such ease that the most delicate
fingers may reproduce the most elabo
rate effects of Venetian work.
When large articles are to be made
invisible iron wire is frequently em
ployed, in connection with the narrow
est strips, in joining the parts, and
when the design is completed it is given
a coat of dead black paint.- which
should be carefully applied over the
entire surface.
The artistic bracket is extremely
graceful and easy, to make. The foun
dation frame, made of iron strips, may
be procured for a small amount, and
the elaborate curves which comprise
the decoration are among the simplest
and most effective of this kind of work.
A fairy lamp, hanging vase or cage
for the feathered pets may be sus
pended from such a bracket, and will
prove a decided ornament to a bay
window.
A candlestick may be made entirely
of the strips of iron, and in the produc
tion of which no foundation is neces
sary. The top of the candlestick may be
pressed apart or together to fit any
candle, and when a dainty shade is
added the whole forms a chaming ac
cessory for my lady's boudoir.
Complete outfits may be procured for
this work, but with a pair of iron
shears, a pair of pliers for making
curves, a pair of clinching benders and
a vise the amateur to whom every dol
lar of expenditure is a consideration
may safely cor.imence her design, with
fair prospect of success. ? -.
Of the four seasons of the year the
Autumn seems the distinctly moral
one.
Spring Is amorous and frolicsome;
Summer sensuous and selfish; the Win
ter wild and wicked. But the Autumn
is grave and introspective.
It is like some serious saint, who
looks with sad, reproving eyes on the
conduct- of two siren sisters and a reck
less brother.
But for the Autumn the year might
blush for the influence of his children
on the human family, but that good
sister of charity brings us all to our
sober senses and compels us to confess
our sins to bur own souls.
The autumnal season is calculated to
gladden the thoughts of the gayest be
ing and to give a serious tinge to the
most frivolous mind.
It is the season of partings and of
changes; of retreating bloom and beau
ty and advancing frosts and snows.
The ephemeral nature of pleasure
forces itself upon us whether we will
or no,- as we hang away our summer
clothing redolent with the . memories
of vanished-- August . .afternoons and
moon-washed nights.
We recall the anticipations, which
were packed into our trunks with those
garments when they were new, and the
long golden summer days which
stretched before us. Now the summer
is over, and its experiences, sweet or
sad, are hung away in time's corri
dors. Seen in perspective,; the Summer
seemed long; but from the retrospect
Doctor making an appointment. The
hours for general, reception at the
house for since Dr. Parkhurst conse
crated himsel- to the public good he
has been accessible to all who want
to see him are from 5 until 6 o'clock
in the afternoon. Just before dinner.
Often there are so many that the even
ing meal is kept waiting until nearly
8 o'clock,' while Mrs. Parkhurst, after
finding out the errand of all, hovers
fn the background to carry her hus
band off to the dinner-table the min
ute there is a lull in the stream of
callers.
I once asked Mrs. Parkhurst how
long how many , months she could
bear this wearing daily routine with
out breaking down physically; and she
said ;
"Just eight and one-half months. It
Is as if we were wound up to run that
length of time. Then we suddenly get
tired, so very tired, we must go away
to rest. For two summers we bailed
the streams of Norway, but it was so
severe there that we have taken Switz
erland since.' We, or at least the Doc
tor, was the first to climb the Matter
horn, you know the story, and" point
ing to a fine oil painting on the walls
of the drawing room "that picture was
painted for him by a celebrated painter
in commemoration of the feat."
Next to the tiresome first Interview
with callers, there comes the duty of
disposing of fully four-fifths of them.
An idea of what people want when they
call upon Dr. Parkhurst can best' be
given by a verbatim account of an
hour's happenings one afternoon, just
before she sailed last spring.
The first caller after luncheon was a
man, a rough-coated Individual, very
untidy, and looking as though one of
the Bowery's worst specimens had
strolled up-town by accident. "I want
a wood-yard ticket," said he, "or half
a dozen of them I'm sure I need 'em
bad enough," this with an ugly grim
ace. "I am sorry," replied Mrs. Parkhurst.
"but I have no more wood-yard tickets
now. Later in the fall, maybe, or next
season." Then, as her eyes fell upon
the worn-out shoes of the man. she
asked kindly, "Are you in great need of
money? And would car-fare do you any
good so you can look for work? Or,
perhaps, you will take this address, and
apply right away. This is our Third
Avenue Mission."
The man took the address and left.
"I feel so sorry for men looking for
work," she started to say but a ring
interrupted her. This time it was a
very well-dressed woman who said she
needed a woman to do general house
work in the country, and would take
anyone recommended by Mrs. Park
hurst. "What a splendid chance for little
Mrs. A., who called this morning with
her three-year-old baby, looking for
work," said Mrs. Parkhurst.
This' was amiably agreed upon, and
then came another ring. This time it
was a girl a very shabby girl, dressed
in the remnants of faded finery; and
her conversation was secret, but I no
ticed that she went away crying, but
with an address in her hand, and car
fare clutched tightly in her torn kid
cloves
"To the Midnight Band of Mercy."
said Mrs. Parkhurst significantly.
Then came a reporter for a verifica
tion of a rumor picked up on the Rialto,
and which was carefully listened to by
Mrs. Parkhurst before she gave an an
swer authorizing Its publication. And
after that were other callers streams
of them. .
"Don't you get tired, Mrs. Park
hurst?" I asked.
"Tes; very tired; and when the day s
work is done I must listen to the latest
movements of the Doctor's societies, or
how else could I act intelligently for
the Doctor during the day when he is
dictating letters, writing sermons and
planning new work with his lieuten
ants? And the work is so new for me.
too!"
Mrs. Parkhurst spoke truly! . The
work Is indeed "new" for her. She was
born a banker's daughter in the town
of Northampton, Connecticut, and when
she married the young professor in the
Williston Seminary at Easthampton, it
was a distinct fall for her In the social
scale, so far as mere dollars were con
cerned, for however much talent the
young teacher had, he could boast small
worldly fortunes. Then came two years
of study atXelpslc, the taking up of a
clergyman's profession, and in a few
years the young professor was a minis
ter of the gospel with a career ahead of
him so his friends said.
Until 20 years ago the summer visit
ors of Lenox sat under the preaching of
"Mr.. Parkhurst," who even then drew
crowds to the mountain church; and,
then came the call to the Madison
Square PreBbyterhin Church, where a
brother of te Dtetor directs the music,
and - more ' millionaires gather every
Sunday evening than In any other
church in the city.
Mrs. Parkhurst, as Ellen Bodman,
was the. prettiest girl of her New Eng
land town; and as a mature matron
she is. very beautiful. She is large, with
very handsome brown eyes, and a man
ner distinctly distinguished. She is of
rather a 'merry disposition; and were
she not so busy with her husband's
work, would be a great ornament to
any society she might seek.
Mrs. Parkhurst's summer mountain
trip and the stay at Switzerland have
greatly benefitted her. There is a rosy
tint in her cheeks, and . her eyes are
bright. She smiles courageously, as aha
echoes the Doctor's words:
"I am stronger than ever for the fight
on the same old lines 1"
ELLA WHEELER WILCOX SATS
THIS IS THE MORAL SEASON
WHEN TOU CAN REPENT
AND BEGIN OVER AGAIN.
ive view it has been brief indeed.
To the very young, life is like a long
golden Summer, but those who have
passed its noon mark realize its brev
ity. Always at this time of the year there
are certain facts which must force
themselves upon the most phlegmatic
mind and penetrate the dullest per
ception. Foremost of these facts is the con
sciousness of the utter folly of pur
suing pleasure through selfish paths.
The man or woman who. obtained a
TATTOOING THE ARMS OF PRETTY GIRLS.
A New Fad in Society and the Strange Devices and Odd Extremes
to Which it is Carried in Color and Design.
Since a Newport belle appeared upon
the sand in her bathing suit and
showed a well rounded arm, still sore
from the prick of the tattooer's needle,
there has been a steadily growing fad
for tattooing, a fad which, while it has
detractors, finds many who think it a
neat one.
An anchor of delicate blue, a sham
rock leaf, an arrow of straw color, a
heart of red or even a tiny dog, shaped,
as one fair young woman has it, like
her own pug dog, may be a pretty ad
dition to the arm's attractions.
The fact that the tattoo is perma
nent is a detraction, but one that
weichs little for, after awhile, it be
comes a feature, one that would be
greatly missed could it be erased.
True, there is another objection. The
tattooed one will bare her arm at even
ing occasions and the tattoo will show.
But, she will tell you when you men
tion this, that she always wears gloves,
and that the tattoo mark is small and
pretty and is an addition, if ever the
arm is uncovered after the dance.
A GIRL'S WORK.
It was formerly only the Hindoo who
could properly perform the tattoo; or
the old sailor taught by a Hindoo.
But this has been exploded in the ac
complishments of the very up-to-date
breadwinner who has learned to tattoo
with skill and who uses the instru
ments and the pigments with a quick
ness that can not be equalled by the
Indian.
The society tattooer is much more
merciful than the Hindoo. Having all
the arts of a woman and the requisite
knowledge of the physician, she can
tattoo without pain. The Hindoo is so
abrupt, even brutal, in his methods,
that the victim faints with pain after
the first fifteen minutes, and few can
stand the pricking for more than five
minutes. With a sharp needle, dipped
in the pigment, he takes the arm in
his hand, pinches it a little and begins
th& cruel Jabbing. Each time the needle
touches the flesh it sinks a quarter of
an inch and an excruciating agony is
present from the beginning to the end
of ' the operation.
The society girl Who tattoes has a
different method. She works with
medicine to assist her. At the begin
ning she gives her patient a dose of
bromide to quiet the nerves. If the
patient wishes to do so she can take it
in whiskey. That nerves her up to the
sticking point of bearing what is to
come.
Then she takes a small bottle and,
from the depths, she dips a little fluid
upon a sponge. It is cocaine and she
brushes the skin with it, waits a mo
ment, and applies it again, until there
is no feeling in the spot which is to be
tattooed. It is the same treatment as
a local application of cocaine to the
eyes which the merciful physician deals
out when a foreign body is to be taken
from the sensitive orb.
Then, quickly, the little needle is
taken up and the work of tattooing be
gins. As rapidly as possible she runs
aroupd the outside to make an outline
of the figure which has previously been
marked out upon the skin. Then she
THE SOCIETT TATTOOER AT WORK WITH NEEDLE AND PIGMENTS
UPON THE ARM OF VHER VICTIM.
.Summer's amusement at the cost of an
other's comfort or happiness and at th
sacrifice of his or her own duty musi
hear the voice of conscience in the wail
of the Autumn wind and find a symbol
of dead gayeties in the dried leaves un
der foot.
People who have ridden roughshod
over the rights of others and pushed
principles aside like straws in their
pursuit of pleasure must be asking
their own hearts at this time of year
the sad question, "Was it worth
while?"
There are certain old platitudes which
we may ridicule as time-worn and out
of date at every other, season of the
year, but which come home to us as
eternal truths in the Autumn twilight.
We realize that nothing pays in life
which takes us outside of the direct
path of duty, and that any word or act
of ours which harms or hurts another
human being is an injury to our own
highest interests.
It is on the first chilly Autumn
nights, when in the small hours wa
draw an extra cover over the couch,
that we lie awake with sorrow in our
hearts for all earth's suffering poor,
and resolve that we will do more for
others and less for self in the days to
come.
And in the Autumn, more than dur
ing any other season of the year, do we
appreciate the real blessing of life,
home and human love and tender ties.
Tes, surely Autumn is the moral sea
son. ELLA WHEELER WILCOX.
d?ps her needle in the fluids and pricks,
one prick as close to the other as pos
sible, and the whole laid together in a
way which, when completed, will form
a tattooed figure.
NOT SO PAINFUL;
If the cocaine runs out it is renewed
by another application and the tat
tooer works to the end of the job with
out giving uneasiness to her patient.
One of the best tattooers in New!
Tork, a slender, pretty girl, with as
many engagements as she can fill, says:
"I find that it is better and pleasanter
to tattoo in the pores. Tou will notice
that the skin has a number of tiny de
pressions; holes they are under the mi
croscope. These are the pores of the
skin, the same ones that become
clogged in the face. And into these
pores I stick my needle. I find that,
when the tattoo is complete, the pig
ment spreads and makes a broad, even
color quite equal to the color produced
A BRACKET WHICH MAT BE USED
FOR ONE OF MANT PUR
POSES, SUCH AS SUP
PORTING A HANGING
BASKET OR A HANG
ING CLOCK.
THIS DESIGN MIGHT BK USED FOB
THE CORNER OF A DOOR WAT
OR FOR A WINDOW, IN- i
STEAD OF A STAINED
GLASS PANE.
by pricking oftener. It is less trouble,
not nearly as tedious, and gives aa
good results."
"What are the favorite - tattoo de
signs now? Well, you know that just
at this time everything is the Sham
rock. I think I have tattooed as many
as twenty tiny green leaves in the last
month. ,
"The Columbia is also a favorite, but
few have the patience to sit while i,
tattoo a whole yacht. j
"The American flag? Of course It ia
popular. I do a great many flags." ... 1
Si

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