OCR Interpretation


Roanoke Rapids herald. [volume] (Roanoke Rapids, N.C.) 1931-1948, November 30, 1939, SECTION C, Image 21

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2017236974/1939-11-30/ed-1/seq-21/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 1

- *3THE ROANOKE RAPIDS
SECTION "C" n
I Carolina*! niurrV/ I y
- * * /IABJU(/^p;NEWS/)^cr^
DIAL R-326 ALL DEP’TS THURSDAY, NOV. 30, 1939 SECTION C—PAGE 1
G. D. FOWLER, 36,
VICTIM OF ACUTE
ATTACK SUN. A. M.
G. D. Fowler, 36, who resided at
1034 Hamilton Street, died in the
city jail last Sunday morning about
8:45. Dr. John Martin, who was
called on the case and examined
Fowler before he was moved from
the jail cell and later at Wiliams
Funera Home, stated at a coro
ner’s inquest that the deceased died
from natural causes, probably an
acute heart attack.
No evidence of foul play was
brought out at the inquest, in
which testimony was given by Dr.
Martin; Policeman W. M. Erwin,
who arrested Fowler late Saturday
night and locked him up; Jenkie
Banks, colored man ,vho was in
the jail at the time of the man’s
death; Policeman P. C. Luter, who
gave Fowler his breakfast Sunday
morning; and R. L. Wrenn at
whose home Fowler was at the
time of his arrest Saturday night.
Mr. Erwin stated at the inquest
that he was called to the home of
R. L. Wrenn on Washington Street
Saturday night about 11 o’clock
and found Mr. Fowler there in an
intoxicated state. Mr. Erwin stat
ed further that there was no sign
of any foul play there and that
the man submitted without any
disturbance. After giving Jenkie
Banks instructions about keeping a
fire in the stove, Mr. Erwin said
he locked up and left the man in
jail. j
Mr. Luter, next to testify, said
that he answered a call at the
Municipal Building about 8:30 and
was informed that a doctor was
wanted at the jail for Mr. Fowler.
Mr. Luter stated that the prisoner
had seemed normal when break
fast had been served to him some
time earlier. The policeman said
that he secured Dr. Martin and
reached the jail in a very few min
utes after he received the call. .
Mr. Wrenn testified that Mr.
Fowler came to his home about 8
o’clock Saturday night and that he
Was drunk and disorderly. He
further stated that he sent for a
policeman about, he thought, two
hours later, informing in the mean
time Mr. Fowler’s wife that
he was calling an officer. Mr.
Wrenn said that he used no force
in trying to get Mr. Fowler out of
his home.
Jenkie Banks, colored man who
was in the jail from the time Mr.
Fowler was brought in until his
death, testified upon being ques
tioned that the white man was
drunk, falling down two or three
titties after he was locked up.
Banks said that he told the man
that he would kill himself if he
didn't watch out, to which Fowler
replied, “That’s all right. I ought
to be dead anyway.” The Negro
said that Fowler lay down after a
while and slept all right through
the night.
Questioned about the fire in the
jail stove, Banks said that the jail
was comfortable all nigjht, and that
Fowler waked up atiout sun up
Sunday morning. He /.aid that they
sat by the fire a,nd talked, re
marking that Fowler “talked all
right.”
Banks said that after Fowler ate
breakfast that he started complain
ing with his stomach, saying “I
ought not to eat that.” The color
ed man said that Fowler then
drank some water, after which he
said that he was going to vomit,
saying a minute later that he
wished he had some soda.
Questioned as to the length of
time between eating and getting
sick, Banks said that Fowler be
came sick after drinking the water,
saying that he was cramping. Aft
er that, the Negro said, Fowler be
gan getting worse, complaining of
cramping and beginning to sweat.
Banks said that he told the sick
man to take off his coat, remark
ing that he didn’t know what to
do for him.
It was then, the colored man
stated, that he saw passing the jail
a man to whom he called and ask
ed bring someone to see the sick
man. Banks said that no one
came and that he called a colored
woman and told her to send some
body down there, that a man was
dying. The Negro said that he
knew that the man was dying and
that he was about to have a fit
himself.
Questioned about Fowler’s actions
earlier Sunday morning. Banks
said that the white man had said
that he felt bad but had made no
complaints to Mr. Luter when he
brought breakfast.
Questioned at length about the
time that elapsed between his be
coming sick and dying, Banks fi
nally stated that he thought it
was about 30 minutes.
Asked if Fowler said anything
after making a final struggle,
Banks stated that he did not and
that he walked over to look at him,
saying, “That man is bound to be
dead.”
The Negro said that Mr. Fowler
had pulled his shoes off the night
| (Continued on Page 8, Sec. C)
1• .:.vj
Gearshift on Steering Post
Controlled Ventilation
WITH <£4 IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS
MORE PEOPLE DRIVE FORDS
THAN ANY OTHER MAKE CAR!
i
194 O
LEADS IN BEAUTY -Jhc most
advanced styling in the field. Rec
ognized by style authorities and
the public as the year’s most beau
tiful low priced car!
LE. )S in RIDING COMFORT
The sensational GLIDE-RIDE a
chieved in the 1940 Ford V-8’s gives
you smoothness.^softness??.luxu
rious comfort...you never dreamed
possible in a low priced car.
LEADS IN PERFORMANCE
Ford is the only low priced car with the
‘fine car’ performance of a powerful V-8
engine. Smoother and so much more
FUN to drive! Finger-Tip Gearshift on
steering post.
LEADS IN ECONOMY- In the
famous 315-mile Gilmore-Yosemite Road
Run held this year, the Ford V-8 showed
the best gas mileage among all leading
low priced cars. Owners report oil is sel
dom, if ever, added between changes.
LEADS IN VALUE — Ford has al
ways been the BIG VALUE in the low
price field. Built to give good service and
long service at low cost, the 1940 models
give you more for your money than ever
before. 22 Important Improvements—
Boomier, Quieter, more Comfortable
cars. Get the facts and you’ll get a Ford!
And—
don’t forget we’ll
give you the best
trade on your car.
WHITE MOTORS, Inc.
Roanoke Ave. at 9th Roanoke Raoids. N. C.
a

xml | txt