OCR Interpretation


Will Maupin's weekly. [volume] (Lincoln, Neb.) 1911-1912, October 25, 1912, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2017270207/1912-10-25/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

r
v
TMs
H5
in Navy Blue or Black
All-Wool Mannish
Serge for . .
THIS REMARKABLE OFFER is
made possible by a large purchase from
a suit manufacturer who makes a spe
cialty of producing plain tailored suits.
This suit is made of an excellent grade of
ALL WOOL mannish serge, in either blue or
black, well tailored and carefully finished, lined
with SKINNER'S SATIN, which is guaran
teed for two seasons.
The style is one of the most popular plain
tailored models, medium length coat,
showing semi-fitting back, regular coat lapels
and sleeves, and small handkerchief pocket.
The skirt is a new straight line model showing
panel back, side pleats each side about iS
inches deep, and pleat in front.
SIZES Misses', 14. ley. IS
Women's. 34, 36. 5S, 40. 42. 44
SAMPLE OF MATERIAL SENT ON REQUEST
EXPRESS PRE-PAID
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA
level-headed business nian. who believes that it is the duty of the
state's chief executive to conduct the state's affairs on strict busi
ness lines insisting upon a. dollar's worth of service for every dol
lar paid, and select public servants because of their ability to per
form their duties instead f because of purely partisan service. He
?s thoroughly committed to the political reforms outlined in the!
democratic state platform. He was fighting for reform when some I
who are now so loudly protesting their progressiveness were well
known sa corporation tools. With other progressive men he labored
successfully to give the state a workable initiative and referendum
law, a board of control for the state institutions, a non-partisan ju
diciary which measure was vetoed by his opponent far the office
of governor and other reforms. If Nebraska wants a chief execu
tive who will be a Chautauqua attraction instead of a business over
seer, Mr. Morehead is not the man. If Nebraska wants a level
headed, successful business man to manage the state.'s business af
fairs. Air. Jlorehad is the man for the position. He will be on the
job all the time, giving it his best attention.
MOREHEAD LEANS TOWARD THE TOILERS.
In a, letter to T. W. Parker, president, of the Nebraska Federa
tion of Labor. John II. Morehead, the democratic candidate for gov
ernor, points out that his every action as a member of the legislature
pointed to keen sympathy for the rights of the wage earners.
The occasion for the letter is the deterujfined effort by Mr.
Morehead 's opponents to place him in a false light before the wage
earners of this state, in order, of course that thss may redound to
the advantage of such opposition.
Mr. Morehead 's letter is as follows:
Trail Monuments Will B St
Th Oregon trail Memorial commis
sion . Us received notice from the
count? clerk of Keith county that Um
board of county commissioners has
agreed to set the tour monuments as
signed to Keith county. One vill be
placed near Pxton. on near OgaUala,
one near Brule, and one at the old
California crossing. Three ot these
nave been shipped and the one for the
old California crossing will h seat
out as soon as sou additional letter
lag can be done. On monument, has
also been shipped to Powell.
Hit By Stray Bullet.
Lincoln. J. Miller, a Cotner univer
sity medical student, was shot and
seriously hurt while riding in an auto
mobile near the Antelope park road
Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. . He nar
rowly escaped with his life when a hall
from a 22-caliber rifle fired by a girl
who was shooting by the roadside,
pierced his cap and chipped a small
piece ot bone from his skull. Miller
was driving the car at the time. He
was rendered unconscious a few mo
ments after the ball had struck him.
A. K. Sheldon, director of the Ne
braska legislative reference bureau, is
preparing a report on sites for his
toric and scenic parks in Nebraska,
to bs presented before the state con
servatkMt commission. Mr. Sheldon
spent considerable time during the
summer gathering information con
cerning spots In the state that would
be suitable for parks. In connection
with this study. Mr. Sheldon recently
received a letter from Prof. A. A.
Tyler ot Belleru. describing the plans
for the proposed forest and park north
of BeUeTuo.
Antonio Ayala. a messenger of the
National Bank of Cuba, has been ar
rested by order ot the special judge
In charge of the investigation into the
disappearance of a package containing
$200,000 which was supposed to have
' been sent by registered mail to the
National Park bank ot New York on
September 27.
JOHN H. MOREHEAD.
John H. Morehead. democratic candidate for governor, was
lvru in Iowa, upon a farm. He attended district school and worked
as a farm haud until he was old
enough and far enough advanced
to enter a business college, lie
worked his way through the busi
ness college, then eatne to Ne
braska. About all he had when
he crossed the Misonri river to
the sundown side was health,
strength and a determination to
succeed honestly and fairly. He
found work as a farm hand, the;-i
secnreni a eeruneate ana taugut
country school for a year or two,
and having saved up a little
money engaged in the general
merchandise business at Barada,
Riehardson eotmty. In business
he was successful, and he invest
ed his money in land and en
gaged in farming and stock rais
ing. Although now classed as a
banker, Mr. Morehead gives more
attention to his farm and live
live stock enterprises than to
bauking. While engaged in business at Barada he was nominated
for county treasurer by the democrats, and to everybody's surprise
but his own was elected the first democrat elected to office in that
county. Two years later he was re-elected by a greatly increased
majority. In 1910 he was nominated for state senator, and he
again broke a record, being the first democrat ever elected to the
state senate from that district. He was made president pro tern
of that body and served with credit, Mr. Morehead served two
terms as mayor of Falls City, and in 190S was a delegate to the
democratic national convention. He has always given his hearty
support to Mr. Bryan in every campaign, and advocated the re
form policies which have made Nebraska democracy famous
throughout the nation. Last spring he was nominated for governor
by the democracy of the state.
Mr. Morehead makes no pretense of being an orator. He is a
" ; )V ;
j"T. Y. Parker, Esq,,
"President Nebraska Federation of Labor,
Lincoln, Nebr.
j My Dear Mr. Parker:
j "It has come to my notice that an effort is being made to put
me in a false Eght with the organized workers of Nebraska. I deem
it ony just to both myself and the wage earners that my position
upon certain questions of interest to the workers be made so plain
! that only those who want to be deceived will be deceived by the
! efforts f my opponents.
j "Of course I believe in the right of wage earners to organize
j for their own protection and mutual assistance; indeed, I deem
such organizations an absolute necessity. I know something about
the benefits that have accrued to the group of toil by reason of or
ganisation, and I also realise the splendid work organized labor has
done in the abolition of child labor and in making more tolerable
the conditions under which men and women must work.
" I want you and your colleagues to know that if I am elected
srovernor I will lend my best assistance to every effort that is made
to further care for the interests of the men and women who work
for wages. I am heartily in favor of putting Nebraska in the ranks
of those progressive states that have already made provisions for
the protection of workers by enacting a wise and equitable com
pensation law.
"Such a law should not. naturally, be drafted by the employes
themselves, neither should it be drafted by employers. But such a
law can and should be drafted by representatives of all factions con
cerned, to the end that while it does exact justice to all, it will do
an injustice to none. I am in favor -of a just arbitration and concil
iation law, such a law as will prevent strikes without lessening in
any wise the opportunities of labor to secure redress of grievances,
nor percftt hot-headed agitators to inSict a wrong upon employers.
"I was a member of the legislature that enacted, more laws in
labor's interests than any other in the state's history. You doubt
less are familiar with those laws." I favored them alL The factory
inspection law needs to be stipplemented by providing for factory
inspection, and the same is true of other labor laws. The time has
come, I believe, when the bureau of labor and industrial .statistics
shr.uld be better equipped, to the end that it may be made of more
service to the rapidly growing army of men and women who work
in Nebraska mills and shops and factories.
" While it is true that this is an agricultural state and always
will be, it is a fact that Nebraska is growing as an industrial state,
and the time is at hand when this fact should -be recognized by ap
propriate legislation and adequate appropriations made for the de
partment of state that is intended to look after the interests of em
ployes. Ton may rest assured that if I am eleeted governor I will
do all I can to bring about this condition.
"I know something about the struggles that the average man
has. I started out in life for myself without a dollar, my only capi
tal being a somewhat limited education that I secured by working
my way through a business college. I worked as a farm hand, tanght
school and clerked in a country store. Later I engaged in business
for myself and have met with a fair measure of success, but I have
not forgotten my earlier struggles, nor would I if I could.
"I trust that this frank letter to yon will be received in the
spirit which prompted its writing. It is only fafir, I take it, that you,
representing a great organization of labor, should know my position
direetlv from me, and not from those who would not hesitate to in
jure me by putting me in a false position.
"Very truly yours,
"JOHN H. MOREHEAD."'
RIVERSIDE
BASE BURNERS
The best base burner in the market. We make this claim
without fear of successful contradiction. The material and
workmanship cannot be excelled.
Largest radiating surface Best hot air circulation.
Two of the many important points of Riverside Superiority. The easiest
base burner to pet up and take down. Repairs seldom needed but easily
obtained. It is the best base burner for the money. All sizes. Sold in
Lincoln, only by
ERNEST HOPPE, HARD WA RE &STO VES
108 North Tenth Street
Cset C. &t
Onyn
All the fancy soft drinks
known to the expert mix
ologist. The favorite re
freshment resort of Lincoln.
Dress zzl
Scndrfcs
Rector's Twelfth and O
Streets, prescriptions accu
rately compounded. Prompt
deliveries.
VSONEY LOAKZD
on household goods, piT
hordes, etc.; long or short time.
No charge for papers. No In
terest la advance. No publicity
or file papers. We guarantee
better terms than others make.
iioticT paid immediately- CO
LUMBIA LOAN CO.. 1ST Sooth
12th.
HANGING IS NOT THE THING.
Hanging is not what Jack Johnson needs. Imprisonment is not
the punishment that should be meted out to that black brute. "I've
got money and you can't get me," he asserts. "I can get any white
woman I want," he impudently exclaims. No, it isn't hanging,
neither is it imprisonment, that Jack Johnson deserves. It is some
thing else. It was meted out to a white man in Falls City a few
years ago. It is punishment not mentioned in polite society circles,
but that fact does not deter ns from alluding to it. It isn't par
ticularly painful, but it is mighty lasting. And it strikes us as being
just about the right punishment to administer to the "big smoke"
who boasts that bis money will protect him in his traffic in white
girls, and that he can "get any white women he wants." All in
favor of the suggestion will please say "Aye!"
T. A. YOUNG
General Hardware
1307 0 St., Lisc3la,.Xs.
Ante B23SO
Bell 573
And it Is wise and prudent to insara
against them in the reliable
NATIONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE
COMPANY
of Lincoln, Nebr.
The "National" does a larger
dent insurance business in Nebraska
than any other company, and settles
all claims promptly and tn full.
A host of satisfied policyholders are
stanch supporters of the "National"
and the numbers are increasing
rapidly.
W. C HOWEY
Secy, and Gsnl. Mgr.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Estate No. 3120. of Thomas Hanky,
deceasedin the County Court of law
caster County. Nebraska.
The State of Nebraska, as.:
itors of said estate win take
that the time limited for
and filing of claims against said
is Slay 15, 1913, and for pay
debts is December 15. 1913; that I '
sit at the County Court room m said
county, on February 17, 1913. at X p.
m. and on May 15, 1913, at 2 p. a, to
receive, examine, hear, allow, or ad
just aU claims and objections defy
filed.
Dated October 9, 1912.
GEO. H. RISSEB.
County Jedga.
By ROBIN R REID.
(Seal
Man past 30 with horse and
to sell stock condition powders
Lancaster county. 15 dollars
month. Address Room Z. 115
SL, Omaha, Neb.
1 1
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN.
A Chase & Baker piano player in good shape, together with
some 75 worth of records, including popular airs, classics, medleys,
etc. The player will fit any make of piano. Reasons for selling,
have a couple of home made piano players now and do not need the
mechanical player. Address, "Player," 240 North Thirty-third
street, Lincoln, Neb.
TfcaCsa Cls Cxsrs C7 to
C.ZZD, PTCC3
Yen C::'.:3 cr
235 C:rti ID 3T
Kansas City, Mo. A score of par
sons were injured in a rear cad col
lision of street cars on the ehmted
tracks in the west bottoms here. Pfty
aicians say several may die.
L
- J
A
I
A

xml | txt