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The Oglala light. [volume] ([Pine Ridge, S.D.]) 190?-19??, April 01, 1918, Image 30

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2017270500/1918-04-01/ed-1/seq-30/

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Secretary Houston Points out How
Boys Can Help Nation.
How every American boy, although
separated by the Atlantic Ocean from
the actual theater of the war against
autocracy, can play his part in up
holding American ideals is pointed
out by Secretary of Agriculture Hous
ton in a message addressed to the Boy
Scouts of America. The Secretary
pledges to the boys the hearty cooper
ation of the federal and State agricul
tural agencies.
Secretary Houston's statement fol
lows:
"The splendid army of Boy Scouts
of America can be of very great help
to the Nation in this time of world
need. The war can be won only if
we deliver the men, the ships, and
the food in sufficient numbers and
quantities to make our war program
effective. You as Boy Scouts can
greatly aid by growing home veget
able gardens, raising pigs and poultry,
conserving food by canning and dry
ing for home use and in many other
ways open to you.
"Will you not help your country
again this year even in a bigger and a
better way than you did during the
summer of 1917? Your task will be
to 'beat your own record' in food pro
duction and conservation. May your
motto for 1918 be, 'every scout to feed
a soldier and one other.'
"I desire to extend to you the hearty
good will and cooperation of the of
ficials of the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture, also that of the
cooperative club leaders of boys' and
girls' extension work at the agricul­
26.
tural col eges, who wiil be glad to
assist you in your work."
Tlie Course of Study
But a few months ago the members
of the Chemawa teaching torce, both
industrial and academ.c, wore that
tense, strained look which tells of a
struggle whose outcome is yet in
doubt. The older and more respon
sible pupils shared this strain. All
Chemawa seemed keyed up to the
breaking point Occasionally taut
nerves would yield a bit and some
one would say, "It's Impossible." But
occasionally, and more and more
often, a face would brigten, a set jaw
would relax and a winner would say,
"The course of study is all right."
Because success is far more in
fectious then failure, today we hear
no one doubting the possibility of our
course of study. Already the greater
throes of the pains of adjustment are
things of the past and we wonder why
we made such hard work of it.
Does this mean we do less work?
No. We do far more. But there is this
difference: In the beginning we work
ed blindly, not to say hopelessly, but
now we begin to see results, excellent
results.
There are yet many knots to be
untangled in our academic work,
many difficulties to be surmounted
in our industrial work, and grave
trials of strength and patience to be
met before we shall have reached
perfection in our administration of
this plan of education. But we now
attack all these problems with confi
dence in the plan and confidence in
ourselves. We have joy in our work
for we have "glimpsed the vision."
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