OCR Interpretation


Payne Field zooms. [volume] (Payne Field, West Point, Miss.) 1918-1919, September 04, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2018270511/1918-09-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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West Point
Hardware
Company
FOR
EVERYTHING
IN
Hardware
Military Lockers
Gold Medal
COTS
We are here to accommodate
you—use us,
WEST POINT, MISS.
When Visiting Columbus
EAT AT
2be Sell Cafe
The Best Equipped and
Most SANITARY Place in Town
J. W. JONES, Druggist
We Carry a Full Line of
Drugs, Cigars, Cigarettes, Cold Drinks
TOILET ARTICLES—STATIONERY
Next Door to Gilmer Hotel
Columbus, Miss.
^_
"OUR BEST LIVER TONIC"
TAKES THE PLACE OF CALOMEL
Acts on the Liver and Cures Indigestion
50c A BOTTLE
FOR SALE BY
R. H. REDUS & COMPANY
WEST POINT, MISS.
Made by Weaver & Harrington, Columbus, Miss.
Established 1889
J. H. Stevens & Son
“The Main Street Grocers”
Columbus, Mississippi
All Things in a First-Class Grocery.
Will Appreciate Your Business
jjf How the First Ride Feels *»
*■ -Jt
Lieut. Arthur Duffey, pres
ent physical director of Payne
Field, describes most vividlj
in a letter to the Boston Posl
the feelings a man experience?
in his first ride in an airplane
Extracts of Lieut. Duffey’s let
ter as printed in the Boston pa
per follow:
“This life is simply one
thrill after another. No one
on the outside, or in civil life
knows what aviation means
and what some of these Ameri
can boys are up against. II
certainly is an eye-opener.
The American aviators deserve
just as much credit as any man
in the trenches. And I know
what I am talking about,
Over in the trenches they are
dodging the missiles of the
Germans, but these boys are
risking their necks every day
they go up into the air.
“When I entered the service
I did not think that I w'ould
have to fly, but I do. I am
now’ an adept at the game and
think nothing of going up.
However, you can imagine my
consternation when I was
handed my first assignment
and the flight surgeon said to
me: ‘Duffey, how is your
nerve?’
“I told him I thought it was
all right and he promptly re
plied :
“Good. I’m glad you’re here.
Tomorrow we are having a
cross-country flight to Tupelo.
I will not be able to go, but you
can. Go over and see that the
boys do not eat their heads off.’
ui course it flabbergasted
me for the moment. But when
I looked around and saw all
kinds of grit and gameness
staring me in the face, I would
not be a quitter for a minute.
First Air Trip
“Well, anyway, the next day
at 10 o’clock we were all as
sembled at the hangars of the
flying field. It made me think
of an intercollegiate cross
country championship. Mo
tors were sputtering all around
me. Wings and wires were
being tested. One after anoth
er the boys, were pulling down
their helmets and placing theii
goggles. Never did any
bunch of athletes set out more
willingly and confidently tc
their task
“Finally my ‘ship’ was
ready. I climbed aboard with
Lieutenant Stewart. I was
strapped to the seat tightly,
my hands on the side like a
regular aviator. The propeller
was set in motion and my
trusty gave her the gun and we
were off. Naturally, I felt a
■ little squeamish. It was the
first time I ever saw a machine
close up. And such a mechan
ical contrivance! Going along
the ground was nothing unlike
riding in an auto; but as the
‘ship’ got up momentufn, like
a bird we gradually rose from
the ground and encircled the
field. We were about 1 000
feet in the air when we set out
for Tupelo.
“Some have been through the
game and know. I remember
a friend telling me that the
sensation was akin to the first
drink. Well, it has been such
a long time since the first one 1
have forgotten the incident,
But let me tell you that run
ning 100 yards in 9 3-5 sec
onds; skirting the end of a
football team for a touchdown,
or putting over the ‘k. o.’ in the
fight game all have their
thrills, but nothing in compar
ison to the first ride in an air
ship.
Must Know Business
“Finally we were to a heighl
of 5000 feet in the air, and fell
in squadron formation. This
is the most difficult part of fly
ing for there are ships above
and below. Some are withir
30 feet distance so you can im
agine how a pilot has to be or
the qui vive. Of course I was
a little apprehensive on the
trip. It was decidedly bumpj
in the air and the good ship
would sink and then stick hei
nose up and climb higher anc
higher. If you can imagine
numerous ships over Washing
ton street in battle formatior
you have an idea of our squad
ron as it approached Tupelo
Coming to the little town we
broke up our formation anc
one by one the ships spiralled
down to the landing field. Jusl
how one feels at a height of
5000 feet and looking down a'
the country below is hard t(
describe. To the novice, natu
rally, the first thought that
flashes through the mind is: j
‘Supposing something should
happen to the machine.’ But
soon this feeling is overcome
and one is taken up with the !
beautiful view below. Huge
trees appear like bushes. All:
| the lines of the different farms
I are easily discernible and one j
j seems to see very clearly in all
directions. It makes one feel
how infinitesimal one is in the
; great world.
‘•But the real thrill of the
) flying game is felt going down.:
J As the ‘ship’ starts to nose 1
j down before the start of the j
spiral it is the same sensation'
as the drop of the chutes at
any beach. But as the spiral
starts all one can do is sit back
and hold fast and wait for
something to happen. It is al-|
| most indescribable, and what!
a relief when the machine;
lands gently on the ground be
fore an amazed crowd.”
REASONS I DID NOT
LIKE MY FUNERAL

The white lily in my hand—|
; I have always disliked the odor
of lilies.
The suspicion that my hair
had not been parted in the
right place.
The draught from the open
l window.
The candles—I hate dim
lights in a big room.
I nmall wF* ovona a nt’ 1
new gloves.
The conversations, carried
on in whispers, as if there had
been a sudden epidemic of lar
yngitis in the room.
The officious family friend
who stopped the hurdy-gurdy
on the sidewalk, right in the
middle of my favorite fox-trot.
The creaking camp chairs
and their irresistible associa
tion with Coney Island steam
ers.
The mixture of roses and pe- j
onies— a most unfortunate'
conmbination of colors.
The many mourners whose
sackcloth and ashes were, 1
suspected, only triumphs of
camouflage.
The rubber-heeled under
taker who behaved as if he
had invented Death and was
trying to be modest about it.
The funeral fan who boasted
that mine was the fifth that
week.
The presence of my good old
friend, Harry—who wished to]
be on the golf links just as ar
dently as 1 did.
The old uncle who insisted
upon detailing unpleasant and
uncensored anecdotes of my
boyhood.
The intimate friend who
took a succession of visitors
aside and confided, in forebod
ing undertones, that I hadn’t
left a nickel.
The woman I didn’t in the
least remember who hysteri
cally asserted that she had i
been the one love of my life, j
1 11C 01gm~0OVlll5 jy* vvvouiv/1*
of servants.
The longing for a cigarette.
The consensus of opinion
that I looked so natural— and
with a lily in my hand!
The falsetto minister who
had a passion for clearing his
throat.
The amateur quartette who
got hopelessly off the key in
“Jerusalem the Golden.”
The rude way in which so
many comparative strangers
stood and stared at me. —Ex.
The American “Aces”
Maj. Raoul Lufberry (killed
May 19, 1918)—18 planes.
Sergt. David E. Putnam,
Brookline, Mass.—13 planes.
Lieut. Frank L. Baylies, Bed
ford, Mass.—12 planes.
Maj. William Thaw, Pitts
burgh, Pa.—5 planes.
Lieut. Douglass Campbell,
Pasadena, Calif.—5 planes.
Lieut. Robert Magoun, Bos
ton, Mass.—5 planes.
Adjt. Edwin C. Parsons,
Springfield, Mass.—5 planes.
Lieut. H. Clay Ferguson,
(wounded Mar. 12, 1918) —
5 planes.
Lieut. Paul Frank Baer, Mo
bile, Ala.—6 planes.
Corp. David McK. Peterson,
Honesdale, Pa.—6 planes.
Lieut. Edward Rickenback
er, New York City—5 planes.
THE GILMER
[HOTELi
Columbus* Mississippi
OFFERS
SPECIAL COURTESIES
To All Men in Uniform
Che Bank of UJest Point
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI
Any business given us will be appreciated and will
receive our best attention. The business of Payne Field
especially solicited. WE WILL do our best to make
our business relations pleasant and agreeable.
FOUR PER CENT PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
DEPOSITS GUARANTEED
BANK OF WEST POINT
____J
Columbus Clothing Co.
CLOTHING
SHOES HATS
HENRY BEARD, - - - - PRESIDENT
Soldiers’ Wives, ATTENTION!
Watkins Millinery & Exchange, 25 Main St.
are prepared « « T T j Other new
now with a O I I 1 I O y- goods arriv
complete line X dll XXdilst^ ing daily.
Com m e rc i a 1. Hotel
Mrs. A. E. Gunter, Proprietress
American Plan—Special Rates to Soldiers
Try Us When in the City.
Columbus, Mississippi
BLAYLOCKS BARBER SHOP
Next Door to Ivy-Deanes Drug Store
FIRST-CLASS SERVICE
We^t Point, c-Mississippi
“MY BARBER SHOP”
TUB BMP SHOWEB BATHS
34 Commerce Street West Point, Miss.

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