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The veterans' review. [volume] (Seattle, Washington) 193?-19??, November 15, 1936, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2019252176/1936-11-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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State’s Womanhood Answers Call 10 Qust Kacketeer Lhiers
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT
VETERANS' NON-PARTISAN
POLITICAL PUBLICATION
IN THE STATE OF WASH
INGTON
V01..1V. NO. 20
HORRORS AT AMERICAN lI.AKE BARED
FIELD NOTES |
By “PAUL"
(continued from last week)
Time—Evening
PLACE-—Official hideout in the
basement of Smith Tower,
CHARACTERS—SeveraI elective
heads of county departments, vil
lage politicians, stooges and “board
of strategy’ strategists.
SCENE-—Typical “board of s'ra
egy” meeting. Some seated, others
sprawled over one or more chairs.
Table on one side of the room well
stocked with various well known
brands of spirits frumenti, gin, chas
ers and whatnot.
Door opeus and newly-crowned
Big Shot swaggers in, cigar tilted
at a dangerous angle and a wild
glint in his eyes.
CHORUS--HI, Boss!
FIRST VOICE-—HI, fellow thugs
—pardon me, | mean mugs. Whassa
matter, 80-Peep? That grand jury
bluff got your goat?
SECOND VOICE
~No-o-0-h ~ .
VOIG
ORI 5 < 8
n't got yourf,
goat—MUCH,
FIRST VOICE—Pipe down! Now
fellow thugs-—pardon me, I mean
mugs—l want to thank you for the
honor you conferred upon me when
I elected myself your leader . . .
(Loud applause)
Maybe you don’t know it, but if
Steve had made the grade, I'd have
been your new senator in 1938,
(Louder npplausé)
FOURTH VOlCE—Maybe you can
still make the grade, Boss. This
grand jury business is just a flash
in the pan.
THIRD VOICE—Heh, heh, heh.
That's what YOU think.
FIRST VOICE—Pipe down! ¥
can handle King county like no
body's businesa It's a cinch,
It’'s in the bag. Here’'s how it
works. Suppose | want some
thing from the WAC. 1| call 'em
up and make my deal. If they
squawk, up go their assessments.
Maybe | want something else.
| get on the phone and powwow
with the real estate firm that
Turn to Page 3, Please.)
WANT ADS
LI
| 2o
el
$ N
—we’ll say
they DO!
TO HANG a “Room for
Rent” sign out for six
weeks without an inquiry
—and then find a lodger in
18 hours through the Want
Ads! To trade a dusty old
parlor organ to an antique
lower for a lawn-mower
and a porch swing! To buy
—to sell—to swap—to hire
—quickly and at low cost!
RESULTS ,
Want’em? Just phone
you ad to Capt. James
Carter at ELiot 2541.
The Heteran's Reviem
THE VETERANS' REVIEW
Sec. %62, P. L. &4 R
Birtkday Party
Lures Cooties
To Puyallup
To the hills, men! Save our little
Nell! The dam has bust!
That will be the battle cry ring
ing on the streets of Puyallup on
’Saturday evening, December 5,
when Valley Pup Tent No. 3, Mili
tary Order of Cooties, throws its
3rd annual birthday “scratch” for
veterans and their friends.
It will be a great soiree, says Carl
1. “Swede” Johnson, master of cere
monies and champion holder of high
offices in the national outfit,
Veterans will converge on Puy
allup from all sections of Oregon
and -Washington, the Swede said
vesterday, He was in Seattle from
the sticks giving some talent a good |
going over. The Swede has quite IJ
reputation as an entertainment pro
vider and usually the boys and girls |
smile to t ¢mselves for weeks after
one of his famous “busts”, |
“GUDE” PARTY
This time the Swede refuses to
divulge what he has lined up for
the secratch, beyond his usual “das
‘har party she ynst bane yavula
gude”.
The doors to KP hall will be
thrown open promptly at eight
o'clock, the Swede said, and then
better be there OT"., .
Supreme Cootie officers of the
13th District have indicated they
will be there that evening, as well
as department officers of the Vet
‘erans of Foreign Wars.
The affair will bé open to all vet
erans and their wives and friends.
Vets Seek Drastic
| Control of Aliens
Solution of many problems hav
ing to do with immigration and
alien residents, particularly crimi
nals and other undesirables, is offer
ed in a program of legislative ob
jectives to be sought by the Vete
rans of Foreign Wars. The program,
suggested by the VFW National De
fense Committee, was recently ad
opted at the 37th national encamp
ment at Denver,
Restriction of immigration to oa
ly those aliens who agree to abide
by the laws of the country, to de
fend the constitution and who agree
to serve in the armed forces of
this country in the event of war, is
one of the provisions of the pro
gram.
The VFW is advocating that such
agreements should be signed in the
presence of American immigration
officials stationed abroad and be
fore the immigrant is authorized to
proceed to American shores.
DEPORT CRIMINALS
Augmenting of border patrols to
prevent smuggling of aliens into
this country is also advocated. It
is also felt -that immigration laws
should provide for the deportation
of criminal and other undesirable
aliens, including those who have
become pub!'c charges and those
who believe in or advocate the over
throw of the American form of gov
ernment by force or violence.
Government employment prefer
ence for American citizens and of
those who have declared their in
tentions to become citizens, and the
immediate deportation of those
found to be illegally residing in this
country are among other objectives
by which the VFW plans to safe
guard American institutions and
government.
3 RPS
FIRST CO
BUTTE, Mont.—Butte Corps No.
1448, Veterans of Foreign Wars,
has organized the first junior drum
and bugle corps to be sponsored
by any veteran organization in
Montana.
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, SECOND NOVEMBER NUMBER, 1930
T 0 COMBAT
1
One of the most remarkable re
sponses of public opinion to a new
organization is the growth of the
Women of Washington, Statewide
Committee, which sprang into being
scarcely more than a month ago to
wage a campaign against racket
eering.
Under the leadership of Mrs. Ed
win Selvin of Seattle, as chairman,
and a small group of women repre
senting different sections ‘of the
state, the Women of Washington
broke into the public eye with their
march to Olympia to ask Governor
Martin for aid in combatting “rack
eteering and lawlessness." Over
night brought a statewide answer
as thousands of women from every
city and town, from every district,
in the state placed their names on
the rolls of the organization.
The Olympia march was followed
by a mass meeting attended by
thousands in the Seattle Civic Audl
torium. Then the women staged a
program that showed the unity of
the state’s womanhood behind the
drive to end the reign of racketeer
ing chiefs against legitimate busi
ness.
; HUNDREDS ENLIST
" “While our group has not taken
dny public action since the mass
meeting, we are nevertheless going
ahead with our program,” Mrs. Sel
vin stated, “Hundreds of names are
being added to our rolls each day.
Women of every station in life, and
from overy part of the state, are
enrolling in the campaign to restore
law and order in Washington. Our
aims appeal to every woman who
has the interest of our state at
heart.”
“Not only the women of Wash
ington but the men, also, have
shown a decided interest in our
program. Funds to finance the
movement have come from all
parts of the state and more than
two thousand persons have do
nated to carry on our cause. Most
of these have been unsolicited
and come from every walk of life.
That, for one thing, has been a
surprising reflection of the state
wide demand for the cleaning out
of the racketeers,” she conclu.'ed.
May Land Huge
Job for Navy
Hopes of Seattle for getting the
U. S. Navy $15,000,000 contract for
building the proposed mammoth
floating self-propelling drydock for
use at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, were
recently brightened by offers of New
York financiers to back a local con
tracting syndicate in bidding for
the huge job. Eastern offers were
relayed by J. D. Ross, member of
the Federal Securities and Exch
ange Commission, to J, A. Earley,
President of the Port of Seattle
Commission, leaders of the local
plan to revive Seattle’s shipbuilding
dominance.
INCREASE ROLLS
Earley reported progress in com
pleting negotiations in cooperation
with Seattle labor unfons and local
contractors and industries to expe
dite Seattle’s bid. Bids must be in
the hands of the government by
November 25, unless the request
for a 2-week extension is granted.
Successful bidding will mean the
bringing of a $9,000,000 payroll to
the city, and millions spent for lo
cal lumber, steel and other ma
terials. ¥
The Port of Seattle has offered
free site for the work. Pier 41 lo
cation is said to provide construc
tion advantages economically su
‘poflor to any other Pacific Coast
location, “
“The Voice of the Veteran”
ONLY INDEPENDENT VETERANS' NEWSPAPER
EDITORIAL
Individualism has beem violated!
There Is but one answer,
The people know what 1t s,
And NOW is the tln.’u'fit, not six months, a year from
now, 3F
As mayor of the city *’M John F\ Dore has been
a miserable failure, a J in the hands of a Master
Mind who, at a certain me; ‘and in a somewhat be
fuddled state, is said to have openly declared that “I get
my forty grand out of @ &lh pulled.”
~BElected to represent people of Seattle as a whole,
John Dore seemingly ments but one class His reason
for so doing is ohvious. ‘l“ohu put him in office. And
John Dore must pay his . blh Master Miud, he says.
IS THAT THE KIND ,“”. SEATTLE WANTS?
John Dore should jack the pages of the history of
Seattle and learn how ' mayor was recalled for vio
lating individualism and ng the wishes of the people.
John Dore should well that bit of history, should
apply it to his own case.
But Jghn Dore will be too late! The die is cast.
John Dore is on his way out—and NOBODY REALIZES
IT MORE THAN JOHN DORE HIMSELF!
There have beén chadtie w_ in Seattle in other
years, but nothing like those of today. There is no legitimate
reason for such a state of affairs. it is due solely to one man's
mad desire to be a dictator and to another man's equally
mad desire to be his stooge.
IS THAT THE KIND OF SEATTLE WANTS?
Statesmanship—indi ! ve debased themselves
to the gutter of politics when the mayor of a city the size of
Seattle accepts support ol the nature accorded him by the
Master Mind, much less boastingly grovels for it.
IS THAT THE KIND OF MAYOR SEATTLE WANTS?
As a mayor, John Dore s x the worst “flops” in the
history of Seattle. Bec { the lawless out “he has
permitted, his name stinks*to the high heavens -~ .- . .
IS THAT THE KIND OF MAYOR SEATTLE WANTS?
John Dore should be kicked out of office. He WILL be
kicked out of office—dishonored—broken—a disgrace to the
party that elected him—repudiated by clear-thinking people—
scorned by the Master Mind—THE LAUGHING STOCK OF
ALL CONCERNED,
IS THAT THE KIND OF MAYOR SEATTLE WANTS?
And the Master Mind?
History is full of stories of Master Minds and what
happened to them. There is but one answer to that, also
—ignominious defeat and lasting disgrace
- . s .
End the strife!
KEnd the warfare!
End the dissenseion!
Regain for Seattle the honored name she once had!
Eliminate the would-be dictators, the Mad Hat mayors!
PUNISH THE RAVISHERS OF INDIVIDUALISM! ;
LET SANITY AGAIN RULE THE CITY!
John Dore, we bid you farewell . . . .
—THE EDITOR.
Mixer Planned by
Alaskan Groups
Former sourdoughs and their
friends are in for a treat, according
to Irvin Heise, president of the Jun
jor Cabin, Alaska-Yukon Pioneers.
At 8 o’clock, Friday evening, No- |
vembmer 27, they will be enter- |
tained at a mixer by the Alaska-|
Yukon Pioneers, Ladies of the|
Golden North and members of the 1
Junior Cabin. The entertainment ‘
will be free, Heise said, and is ex
pected to be followed with a dance, :
The affair will take place in the
MEBA Hall at 1923 First Avenue. '
Capt- A, J. Goddard is chairman |
of the arrangements committee, As- |
sisting him are Fred Bond, George |’
W. Snow, Roy Mathews, Kenneth |
Cross, Clint Rowley and Heise, ‘
Cross, who is secretary of the
Junior Cabin, will serve as master !
nf soromnnica .
al
e ANNUAL INVALID’S BALL
n
Y Sponsored by
5t
.|| Society for the Relief of the Federation
e
o of Russian War Disabled
-
« D. A. R. CHAPTER HOUSE
800 East Roy Street
d
o THANKSGIVING EVENING . .. NOVEMBER 25, 1936
c
:t Open House for All Veterans and Their Friends |
M
Noble Work tor Humanity
Visiting Nurse Service Doing
By GLORIA REED
One of the worthwhile organizations about which the aver
age person hears little or nothing, yet which is doing a worlc
of good for humanity, is the Seattle Visiting Nurses’ Service
Originally a part of the Red Cross, the Service withdrev
from the Red Cross in 1928 and incorporated as a private organ
ization, Headquarters is located in the White Building, Seattle
where nurses are on duty from
eight to five each day, except Sun
days and holidays.
The service, according to Miss
Olive Kerry, is available to all, re
gardless of race, creed or financial
status. The personnel is composed
of graduate nurses, each with one
year postgraduate work to her
eredit in public health service,
Work of the Service is done
under the supervision of an advis
ory committee of doctors appointed
Flag Ceremony
West Side Vets Plan Colorful Flag
A flag presentation to members
of the drum and bugle corps of Ma
jor George W, Farwell Post No.
2713, Veterans of Foreign Wars,
will be held at an outdoor gathering
at Hiawatha Fieldhouse on Satur
day evening, November 28, Com
mander W_H. Patterson announced
vesterday.
A dance will follow the flag cere.
mony and many civie, service and
social club leaders of West Seattle
will attend, it is said.
The drum and
bugle corps, now
numbering 652 )
boys, has made 1
an outstanding
record the past; |
year under the " |
able leadership SR, J
of Director Will- }' '
jam L. Thiba- F M ‘
deaun. .’::
The national ’p '
r flag, as well as
the corps flag, is .
a gift of the Sanislo
Mother's Club of which Irene San
islo is president. The army will be
represented at the ceremonies by
Major J. J. Sullivan and the navy
Dy “TYsitenant Commundes:
Fenton,
PESENT COLORS
Commander Patterson will pre
sent the color guard with two guns
converted from war trophies and
Capt. Stephen E. Sanislo will be
master of ('PI‘(?IH()IH(‘S.
The program will include a re
view of the drum and bugle corps,
and speeches by E, B. Erickson,
president of West Seattle (‘,ummer-l
cial Club; Commander Patterson;
Mrs. K. K. Peters, president of thel
Auxiliary and Mrs. Irene Sanlllo.l
Featured guests at the ceremon
jes will be Judge and Mrs. William
G. Long, Major J. J. Sullivan, Bruce
Evander, commander of Puget
Sound Council, Veterans of Foreign
Wars, and Commissioner Jack Tay- |
lor. |
by the King County Medical So
ciety and a board of about thirty
women elected from a group of
people interested in this particular
ltype of work. Members of the ad
visory board serve without pay.
FREE CARE
The organization is the only one
in the city giving free bedside care
in the home, in a hotel, or in any
sort of lodging house. If a call
comes for a nurse before one
o'clock, the nurse is sent out that
day, but if the call comes in after
one o'clock, she is not sent out
until the following morning. °
The city is divided into twelve
districts, with a nurse assigned to
each district. The nurse goes on a
vigiting-basis only; that is to say,
she does not assume any of the pre
rogatives of a physician, such as
diagnosing a case. The maximum
| time limit of a case is two hours,
but one hour is usually enough.
Nurses are qualified to teach
someone in the home to carry out
the doctor’s orders and to care for
llhe patient in the family in be
(Turn to Page 2, Please)
g
- . » %
' Disabled Veteran Hurls Serious
's and Others
~ Charges at MO’s an b 5
. . ’
: Connected with Hospital
One-Time Victim of Cruel and Revolting Practices
Names Those Responsible for Present Abhorrent
Situation—Vets Treated Worse Than Slaves
| Fifth of a series of articles dealing with veterans afflicted with
\monul and nervous disorders, the treatment accorded them and the
way the GUARDIAN RACKET is worked.
By PAUL DAINGERFIELD
CHAPTER § :
Last week Tom Thorne, disabled shellshocked war veteran with
an “NP” rating, promised to reveal further horrors and inhumanities
practiced at the Veterans' Hospital at American Lake. He also promised
to reveal the names of those at the bottom of and responsible for the
‘various torms of deviltry to which veterans are reported to be regularly
subjected.
This week, Tom makes good his promise, He does not minee words,
He asks no quarter, gives no quarter. Where credit {8 due, he has
bestowed it. Where censure is due, he has bestowed it in words con
cerning which there can be no misunderstanding.
Tom has been through the mill, through the alleged ghastly hell
hole that Is supposed to “rehabilitate” veterans afflicted with Ml-.
and nervous disorders. HE KNOWS what goes on at American Lake
because—HE WAS ONCE A PRISONER THERE HIMSELF, t
His story follows:
~As previously mentioned, I spent
some time in the Western State
Hospital at Steilacoom before being
transferred to American Lake, Dr,
W. N, Keller wasn't superintendent
at that time. But friends tell me
that Dr, Keller I 8 a REAL superin:
tendent and that he allows no eru-
A o
i.n‘ .‘HAY v‘.s"‘_';‘.'fl“*‘%lcfi 2 ‘!‘.‘:‘} :¢‘-
possible to society. SN
I just recently learned that Dr.
Keller is interested in new legisla
tion designed to protect veterans
sent to his hospital for treatment.
SINCERE MOTIVES
What Dr. Keller needs is legis
lation which will permit him to dis
charge all patients “railroaded” into
the asylum, something he is legally
unable to do at the present time,
Legislation compelling the courts
to keep confidential all records per
taining to veteran cases is also
badly needed,
Dr. Keller isn't a tyrant. He is
sincere and in his present fight for
adequate legislation, deserves the
whole-hearted support of all vet
erans and veteran organizations.
| Dr. Reuben was the MO in charge
iut Américan Lake when | first went
‘there. | have nothing hHut words of
|——-——— —eeee 1
PTTETP ALy
‘““Come on, you dice. Baby needs new shoes. Ah-h-h Roll
'em dice, boy. Watch that seven - - - - :
““Aw, hell! Snakeyes!'’ ;
Connie Ireland speaking—in the bus depot at Tacoma. He
was waiting for someone, or something, as the case may be.
Andhi;wdtingwok the form of a large box of chocolates (bon
bons, to us old timers)—at the ex- o
pense of the slinky brunette at the b,
cigar counter.
The seven o’clock bus from Se
attle rolled in and a gal reporter
rolled out, or off, as the case may
he. She is said to have more brass
than brain, but we'll forget that for ‘
the moment. |
“Hi, Tacoma,” she yodeled in dul
cet tones.
“Hi, Seattle,” barked Connie, “It's
Mount Tacoma to you tonight.” =
“Tacoma, my hat! Its’ Mount Rai
nier, always has been and always
will be!” So saying, the gal re
| porter gmb«l into the 110 lh:ny
(?) coupe of the Golden Rodent of
|the Trench Rats, and headed for
| South Tacoma.
1 Enroute to the banquet given in
‘|honor of Dolly Secord, national
| commander of the Auxiliary to the
| Disabled American Veterans, Con:
nie stopped to pick up his mother,
(Turn to page 5, please) ; -oo oy
DN e S
Connie 1 brows Snakeyes but W ins
Gal Reporter on Next Pass
AN INDEPENDENT VETER.
ANS NEWSPAPER DEDL
CATED TO AND PUBLISHED
FOR THE RANK AND FILE
OF THE EXSERVICEMEN
e s
Price Five Cents
—— "—’—--*-—‘——-—‘_u% .
praise for the way he and his staf
treated us. All other things being
equal, we were allowed passes
whenever we asked M“Efi |
was .no forced labor and “,
n were treated Itke huma r;;
ings, not like a bunch dm:"_:' £
v for othe)
tives. He bullt morale, instead of
tearing it down. He was '1 :
pathetic, understanding. During his
regime, more veterans were re
habilitated and returned to soclety
than the present medical staff could
rehabilitate in a lifetime. Dr. Reun
‘ben was on the level, a “square
guy,” and we would have gone to
hell and Yack for him,
STALTER “NICE”
Dr. George Stalter, the present
MO in charge at American Lake, is
a very flue man with whom to have
a conversation. He is quiet-man:
nered, agreeable and, on the '”
face, has an even temper,
But Dr. Stalter lacks nerve. |
is completely dominated u‘ e/
T. C. Neil and when appealed to '.'[email protected]‘e'
a veteran, fails to wt promptly and
(Turn to Page 6, Please)
~— By RUTH McNEELY

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