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The Gem state rural. [volume] (Caldwell, Idaho) 1895-1910, September 15, 1895, Image 1

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GEM STATE RURAE
VOLUME 1.
FACTS ABOUT IDAHO.
It has an estimated population
of 135,000 souls.
The assessed valuation of ffie
property of the State for i$V
$29,332,210.38.
There was an
is
y.i
increase m
assessed valuation in 1895
that of 1894 of nearly $345,000.
over
per head, and their annual wool 1
The State has 717,339 si
leep
These are assessed at one doll;
IC
pounds.
m
*1 he State has a good
public
school system, free text book -,
State university, two State
mal c chooIs, and several
educational institutions.
a
nor
other
The total railroad mileagf
Idaho is nearly
of
out
1000 miles,
this is not one-half of what F
Ur- !
gently needed to prop • -I ie
velop the State's resources
t
I
Since the discovery of g. ■ ,
i860, Idaho's mines have anml- i
ally produced about $6,00a,00b ;
T
I
worth of peecious metals. In }8qb
the mineral output of the Staue
' ' ' '
was $ 14 , 000 , 000 .
The word Idaho is of Indian
origin, and means The Gern of
the Mountains. The State
m area of 84,000 square miles.
a maximum length of 2 o
miico, and its greatest wv
250 miles.
as
if*
i
The lands of Idaho are classi
fied as followed: Grazing,
25r
000,000 acres; agricultural 1 5/w ),
000; timber, 7,000,000, lake> rt nd
rivers 1,000,000 acres. To th
must be added several milium ;
se
, j
i
j
acres of mineral and mountain*
lands.
U
The climate of Idaho in ah Î
lower altitudes, is excepta»!
{ \
mild and health giving. IT
States army records for it a,
years show the average mort. U
y
in the State to have been 3,74 or
each thousand soldiers—rnakiiw
the lowest average death rati . f
any State or Territory in the
Un ; on.
Cyclones, blizzards anil sun
strokes are unknown in Idaho,
The annual rain fall differs i
different parts of the State
Southern Idaho it averages r an
lots 13 inches. North of the
45th parallel the rain fall is
greater, and in most locali; ; s
n
In
CALDWELL,
IDAHO,
sufficient to
j irrigation.
The largest body of agricul
tural land in
in the arid
mature crops without
the State
or
west
to cultivation, is
Snake river valley, which has
succeptable
in the great
an
average width of
Idaho, of about 800
miles
50
and a length of the State
of
miles. This
also comprises a vast extent of as
choice fruit land as can be found
011 the continent,
_ ,
1 he following synopsis of the
official report of the Worlds
Idaho Fruits
at the
Exposition.
Coin in hi an
1
Fair
Commissioners
on Idaho fruits
will serve to illustrate the i
e impress
ion
made by our young Common
wealth at the big show:
APPLES, (CROP OF I 892. )
A iarcTP. ovKJK.-f .•
A large exhibit, representing
twenty-three varieties, correctly
named. The u il A 'icus
lor dessert and cooking j
but eX( ells chief!)- in color, uni
(form size, freedom from insects'
and other blemishes, which render
i its e war i et jes esp ec
. poses,
lly
iluable
jlor anaket purpcAesP
APPLES, (CROP of 1893 .)
rorty-three varieties, the es
j pedal point of merit being
' color, uniform
i insect and other blemishes
high
size, freedom from

an a
excellence.
: genera
PEARS.
Fifteen varieties, possessing
general excellence in color, size
and freedom from insect and other
blemishes.
ties
PRUNES,
German and Hungarian varie- |
A few specimen branches
shown demonstrate the wonderful
productiveness of the Prune in
Idaho. I he fruit has a rich flavor
arid is unusually large and perfect
in appearance.
in appearance.
PEACHES.
This fruit is meritorious for its
excellent quality and freedom
f rorn blemishes.
APRICOTS.
Of excellent flavor and perfect
in appearance.
f
i
possess ng
GRAPES.
j
general excellence,
1
j
their color, flavor and
For good specimens of Black
1 Hamburg. Black Peter, Foster,
Ross of Peru, Sweetwater and
. Delaware varieties,
,

DRIED PRUNES.
I
in
Their excellence consF
1
SEPTEMBER
15 , 1835 .
the rcsidt of skillful
neatly packecf for
pea ran ce,
evaporation,
condition and
exhibition.
anged
elegant pavilion, placed
against the wall on the east side
of the north win«- of the* HnrHml
tural Building, and about four
.
THE
horticultural
EXHIBIT
Consisted of over a hundred boxes
of dried fruit, 12x18 inches, cover
ed with glass, tastefully
arr
m an
hundred jars of various sizes of
fruit
in solution, with
supply of fresh fruit and
an ample
vege
tables show
n on plates during the
the first of N ^ °u Mdy
me nrstot November, all arranged
in a separate paviliion on the west
i side, and which formed
season.
our chief
exhibit in
most attractive
Horticulture. It is surprising that
Idaho should have made so
ant
i
1
gen
complete an exhibit
outlay so small, and that
she should have taken so many
awards as against older States
j eraJ and .
so
on an
! that llave been making a specialty
. Q f fruit exhibits for the past quar'
ter of a rpnhm; : c 1 ■ " 1
a | ; ', " y o less remark-i
Fii st .Semi*Annu
;»I Meeting ro he HeM
tu Payette.
n f ff. , Tj ,. 1 e • "
or tiw btaie Horticultural Society
u/ili I . • ii , f
win b», held in Payette, Canyon
county, one of the best points
tne Slate to observe the practical
if fruit
it)
r kings
wo
growing, on
; day and Thursday, Sep
tember 18 and 19, 1896.
The society meets
Wed i
s
to discuss
the condition of the orchards, the
best methods of growing
the causes of fail
them,
ure, if any, the
difficulties to be encountered and
the best mrthods of
the obstacles in the way of suc
com bat in«
b
cess.
Essays and
papers on appro
and discussions of
"Apple Orchards,"
priate topics
the same,
as
"Apple Orchards,"
Ornamental
and
same,
"Prune
as
Culture,
Planting,
"Insects," "Fungi,
others of general interest, will be
leading matter., of the
meeting.
1 here v» ill also bt addresses by
prominent persAiu interested in
work.
t F
It is intended that the
mgs of th
diictiye of
valuable
T acts ey<
pm
meet
ocietv wi! 1 he
d
results
.<
n elioitm
regarding
n v. ti'mation
lests of
fence
van
j
ftp es, suce* »es or failures.
and
o^her .matters of ïpterest to fruit
v iower ' o. Idaho.
The
NUMBER
will make ample provision for the
Pr ° PCr accommod ation of all who
may attend.
All persons who are interested
in the development of th
ces of Idaho, particularly the fruit
j £ r °wing industry,
requested to be present and
I ticipate in the meeting,
, ,
C t0 attend ' but havin S
questions of general interest they
desire to have considered,* should
forward the questions to the
e resour
urgently
are
par
Persons
sec
retary, Robort Milliken, Nampa,
prior t0 the meetin £. so that they
y
^ recelve proper consideration.
Additional information desired
j
cheerfully given.
j
J. J. I (DOLE, President
Robert Milliken,
Secretary, Nampa, Idaho.
|
[
Preserving Fruits for Exhibitions.
Payette.
Numerous inquiries hwe
re
cently been made for reciepes to
preserve fruits for exhibition
pur
absolute
preservative is alcohol, though for
poses,
The best and
general use it is too expensive.
Goba re a> are oluaunej vvnere
, „ ,
equal parts of alcohol
:
and water
Other formulas
are used,
i follows:
are as
1.
-Salicylic acid 2 dr;
Alcohol 4 oz.
Purified G!v
uns.
cvnne ; oz.
Distilled (or rain) water 5 quarts
! Disolve the
2 drams of salicylic
acid with the 4 ounces of alcohol.
j
;
Desolve the glycerine ( better with
the water boiling hot) adding it :
j the other ingredients and * place
the fruit therein and seal tight.
2.— For preserving red fruits
use sulphuretted water. Druggist
will prepare it.
4-—'Salicylic acid
4-—'Salicylic acid y dram; den
ounces alcohol, add
one quart of pure soft water or
distilled water.
solve it in 2
5 -—Make salt brine strong
enough to carry an egg, add to
this one dram of alum, 1 y quail
of the brine. Strain and use.
6.—Sulphurous acid
rholoride may be used, but sul
rous aciu oleaches the color 1
or zinc
' the frui 1 -
Corrosive
violent poison—up-*
porportion of) '
gallon of
on »lunate—
1. 1
/
oe usee u
to to
v ' l^Tstcn

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