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The Gem state rural. [volume] (Caldwell, Idaho) 1895-1910, February 22, 1906, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2019269501/1906-02-22/ed-1/seq-5/

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How to Detect Cotton Thread in Cloth.
The difference between wool and
cotton is very great, and in the case of
separate threads of each is plainly ap
parent, says the American Sheep
Breeder; yet, when these same threads
are closely interwoven some good
judges are mistaken, and buy mixed
cotton and wool goods, firmly convinc
ed that there is not a thread of cotton
in the cloth. It is the custom of all
mills that manufacture cotton and
wool mixtures to run the cotton cross
wise in the looms, thus leaving the
wool to run lengthwise This is done
for two purposes: first, to impart the
glossy appearance which the longer
stretch of wool thread gives when run
in the length of the good», and, sec
ondly, because the proportion of cotton
<
difficult to detect. The cotton thread
of course is much smaller and very
difficult to distinguish in closely wov
en fabric. There is one infallible test
however, says Men and Women: Take
a bolt of goods at the cut end and ex
amine closely the crosswise thread,
slowly pulling it apart. If it breaks
almost evenly and comes apart slowly
then one is safe in judging it to be all
wool. If, on the contrary, it breaks in
short, uneven strands and falls apart
easily, refuse to accept the goods, for
it is undeniably cotton, and will not
give satisfaction. It were much bet
ter to get all cotton or all wool.
Lovely Hat».
Many hats are of light delicately tint
ed plush lined with black plush, the
black next the face proving very be
coming and bringing the hat into line
with the all black costume which is
now so generally worn. One of the
newest shapes in toques is very small,
like an inverted saucer almost, the
round brim curving upward all round
and a very high wing or wings placed
upright on the left for sole trimming.
This shape requires a full, well dressed
coiffure, but is extremely becoming
when well worn. Violets are much
used on toques and hats as soon as
New Year's is past. Nothing is prettier
tban violets as cache-peignes in clumps
and clusters, but newest of all fashion
ed into the form of wings and feathers,
and both toques and hats are ruched
round with violets or violets simulated
by silk petals.
Currant Jelly Sauce.
Beat half a cup of currant jelly with
a fork; then dissolve in two-thirds of
a cup of boiling water and thicken
with a teaspoonful and a half of ar
rowroot mixed with a few spoonfuls
of cold water. Just before serving add
a tablespoouful each of butter and lem
on juice.
For January Function«.
The Illustration from Table Talk of
New Year custards shows a dish that
may be useful at some of the many
social functions occurring after the
holidays. This custard consists of one
£1
-V,
OUSTAJRI» AND CITBON WISHBONES.
cupful of sweetened apple sauce, uot
too watery, whipped, a spoonful at a
time, with the whites of four eggs prt
vlously beaten to a stiff froth. This is
heaped in pretty chocolate cups awl
garnished with little wl»hbone» vta
from citron.
THE LADY COOK.
The Intelligent and Skillful Cook
Needed Everywhere,
The old time idea that cooking is
drudgery and a work suitable to men
ials is now obsolete. The lady cook is
in demand. Modem cooking calls for
rare Intelligence and that expert skill
which is gained only by practical ex
perience. The modern cook needs to
be versed in bacteriology, physiology,
chemistry and sanitary science, yet it
is safe to say few cooks have received
even a smattering of Instruction In any
of these subjects. Most women who
have had scientific training seem to
think they have been educated above
housekeeping, and hence they are likely j
to make no practical use at all of their
knowledge. There are chefs, or men
cooks, who receive salaries of $5,000 or
$10,000 a year. But where are the
women cooks who receive in compensa
tion for service one-half or one-fourth
of these sums? The standard of cook
ery should be raised, and that, too. by
women, to that of other kinds of skilled
labor. And the occupation calls for
something more than skilled labor; it is
well nigh a profession.
Why Avoid Homeuorkt
Why do women seek to avoid the oc
cupation of housekeeping, and especial
ly the offices that center about the
kitchen? Why should they not rather
aspire to render the railing dignified
and honorable? In all large towns !
there are young women in numbers
who are earning in shop and office from
$4 to $6 or $8 a week. With this
stipend they must pay living expenses. I
and they are in constant anxiety about
steady employment. As qualified cooks
many of these same young women j
might earn, at any rate save, more I
money, and certainly they could always !
find steady employment.
It is time the neat, the Intelligent, the
skillful cook was everywhere abroad
in the land. She is needed. Remunera
tive business is within her reach, places
are waiting for her. and, besides, in
qualifying for these one is making the
very best preparation to undertake wo
I

man's highest calling in life.—Boston
Cooking School Magazine.
MOURNING MODES.
Crape Much Improved In Qualify.
Soff and Lnutrona.
Modes seem to have their cycles—
vanishing, mounting again into view,
then gradually waning, only to reap
'5.-*
f
\
I
u
J
MOülîNINGt DKESS.
pear again when their time corneal
round. Somewhat after this fashion i
has been the course of the conventional \
habiliments of woe.
For a space crape fell into a certain !
abeyance, hut during the last three or j
four years it has been picking up stead-1
and may now he once more j
accounted the same decorative adjunct !
as ^ vore I
' W ithout doubt some share of Its re -1
vive<1 favor must be accorded to 1m- j
provemen t { U the quality and appear -1
nn r p nf the material An Ingenious
uv again
I
I
process of waterproofing Tenders
varieties of crape practically free from
all danger of damage by rain. This
does away to a great degree with the
once almost prohibitive costliness of
this material, which was a serious det
riment In times past, because a single
day's wear under unfavorable weather
conditions sufficed to take .away all
Its look of freshness, l acking jyhlch
crape is a poor thing indeed.
Yet another improvement ?
also with appearance. The 1
soft finish now achieved li..
much more happily with the
fabrics _of_the present vogue, u*.
some
r
Here
it
Is
w
Î
The Best# Steel
Range in Idaho
v'iJII
for
. % Aj
$ 35.00
■ :
Has larye 15-gallon Reservoir and first class in every
resptc. Frias on oilier goods proportionately low.
DOAN <Sb HAY CO. Ltd.
Caldwell, Idaho.
J
Caldwell Banking (Sk
Trust. Company, Ltd.
t
Capital and Surplus $75,000.00
A. K STEUNENBERG, CASHIER
Per Cent#
Clear on Your Money
You pay no taxes, take no risk, have no worry.
You furnish the money—we do the rest#. All you
need do is to call and get your dividends when due.
We Make Money Work
U
?
A
W. R. SEBREE, VICE-PRESIDENT
HOWARD SEBREE, PRESIDENT
R. A. COWDEN, CASHIER
A
A
v
first national Bank
A
vy
A
K/
A
A
vy
CALDWELL, IDAHO
A
vy
A
vy
A General Banking Business Transacted
A
vy
A
CORRESPONDENCE INVITED
H J. ZEH
R. S. MADDEN
Established 1S92.
Canyon County Abstract Company,
Snniirh Abatrartpra.
Abstracts of Title, Conveyancing, Doans and Insurance.
New Bank Building, Caldwell, Idaho.
Office
being produced which were Impossible
with the old time stiff qualities of
crape.
This soft finished material Is in the
best of favor with the French ele
gantes, who appear to make a ready
use of it on the slightest of occasion,
and American women are not in the
least behind their French sisters in ap
preciating the pleasing possibilities in
the fabrics now devoted to the insignia
f sorrow.
The fashion of mourning garb fol
ws ruling modes, with but few dlf
.ences, as will be Inferred from the
accompanying sketches.

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