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The Indian advocate. ([Sacred Heart, Okla.]) 1???-1910, July 01, 1900, Image 5

Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/45043535/1900-07-01/ed-1/seq-5/

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The Indian Advocate. 96
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detailed to lead them. The slave was well acquainted
with the Indians, spoke the Seminole tongue fluently.
The affair of Dade's Massacre is without a parallel in
the history of Indian warfare. Of the 110 men, who, with
flying- flags and sounding bugles merrily responed to Gen
eral Clinch's order, but two lived to describe in after years
the tragic scenes. One was Private Clark, of the 2d artil
lery, who, wounded and sick crawled on his hands and
knees a distance of sixty miles to Fort Brooke; the other
was the negro slave, who escaped without a wound.
This slave, Louis Pacheo by name, shared the fortunes of
Wild Cat known also as Coacoochec, in the Indian Ter
ritory. Subsequently, with his followers, Louis among
the number, Wild Cat emigrated to Mexico. But the old
slave returned to Florida in 1892 and died in Jacksonville,
Florida, January, 1895, aged 95 years.
The tragic news of the Dade Massacre convinced the
United States that war was commenced in real earnest.
From this time on, skirmish after skirmish ensued, bloody
murders were committed by the red-skins, thousands of
Ml dollars were being expended by our government, and the
white population was in a suffering condition. The In
dians were not suffering for food. The chameleon-like
character of the war presented no certainty of success.
General Jessup, considerably chagrined, wrote to Wash
ington for permission to resign both the glory and baton
of his command.
. There could scarcely arise a more painful theme, or
one presenting a stranger variety of aspects, as it whirled
scathing and bloody along, than did the Indian war. Yet
it is a remarkable fact that no Seminole Warrior had ever
surrendered, even to superior numbers. Our military
v forces had learned what a hydra-headed monster the war
really was, and attempts were again made to induce emi
gration. The horrors of the Dade Massacre and Fort
King had reached the world. General Jessup sought ne
igotiations; but found the same difficulties to encounter as

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