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The Indian advocate. ([Sacred Heart, Okla.]) 1???-1910, November 01, 1904, Image 9

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/45043535/1904-11-01/ed-1/seq-9/

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THE INDIAN ADVOCATE
354
ral) Ranald S. Mackenzie, Fourth cavalry (Afangomhcuic,
"No index-finger," on account of the loss of that finger
whom the Comanche already knew to their sorrow, with a
detachement of his regiment, after repelling two attacks, sur
prised a large body of Cheyenne and their allies in a canyon
near Red river Texas, destroying over a hundred tipis and
capturing their entire camp outfit, with over fourteen hundred
horses and mules. This was the severest blow the Indians
had yet received. On October 9, Colonel George P. Buell,
Eleventh infantry, struck and destroyed a large Kiowa camp
on the Salt fork of Red river, and fight days later Captain
Adna R. Chaffee, Sixth cavalry, surprised and destroyed an
other camp north of the Washita, the Indians fleeing without
attempting a defense.
As a result of these succesive losses the Indians became
discouraged, and early in October the Comanche spnt mes
sengers asking permission to come into the agency. Permis
sion being given, Tabina'naka, White-wolf, and Red-food,
with their people, started in and were met on Elk Greek by
a detachement from Fort Sill, under Major G. W. Schofield,
who received their surrender and brought them in to the fort.
Others came in a few days later and surrendered, making in
all about four hundred Indians with about two thousand
horses. Other Comanche and Kiowa in small parties con
tinued to come in, the men being imprisoned under guard as
fast as they arrived. Big-bow was allowed to go back to in
duce the Kiowa to come in, and was successful, returning in
Frebruary, 1875, with Lone-wolf, Red-otter Apcn-guadal'),
(Tsa'tfatt'at'H), Dohasan, and Poor-buffalo, and their people,
who were met on their way in by the interpreter, Philip
McCusker, and some friendly Comanche, to whom they sur
rendered their arms and horses. Poor-buffalo and his band
had been enrolled among the friendlies, but had fled at the
time of the agency fight. This left only a few of the Kiowa
out, and these also came in soon after. In the meantime
small bodies of Cheyenne were coming in and surrender-

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