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The Indian advocate. ([Sacred Heart, Okla.]) 1???-1910, May 01, 1908, Image 13

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/45043535/1908-05-01/ed-1/seq-13/

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THE INDIAN ADVOCATE 146
"By Jove! but she and Norah had a narrow escape! hauled
in, in the very nick of time, to save them from drowning; and
this she declares, all because of the medal. See, she encloses
one of those wonder working marvels, and begs again that 1
will wear it it would make her so happy!
''Upon my word, George, I shall begin to pout if this young
lady threatens to enproach on prerogatives," said his wife,
smiling as she took the offered letter to read for herself. ''You
are pretty well looked after,. I should say, already!"
After reading Rose's story to the end, "It is certainly re
markable,'' she added," and, believing as the girl does. I
am not surprised at her attributing a miraculous power to
the medal. Do you mean to wear it?"
"No, 1 could not bring myself to do anything I should con
sider so irrational. If it were simply a brass coin, I should
not mind wearing it to please her, but with this religious ele
men attached. to it, I should feel as if I were abetting, or
pretending, to superstition. What's your view of the case?"
"I should say, wear it as you would a coin, and forget the
religious element. It can't do no harm, if it does you no
good; and it will please your little friend."
"You are a wise woman, wifey! I'll till her for her sake, and
for auld lang syne, 1 will wear it as she requests, but that, if
1 ever feel a scruple about doing so, she must leave me free
to take it off, and put it carefully by, as a keepsake." .
A letter was written suggesting this arrangement. Rose
accepted the compromise. And George acted accordingly,
wearing the medal for a time, and then consigning it to his
dressing-case.
After some peaceful and happy years, this loving couple
were visited by sickness and sorrow. The young wife fell
ill of malignant fever; and her husband, after a few weeks
of intense anxiety and anguish, was left distracted and
alone.
i.Hisceaseless watching, day and night, by his dying wife,
lpss of restj and distaste for food, told heavily, not only on
his bodily health, but for some time endangered his reason.

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