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The herald-advance. (Milbank, S.D.) 1890-1922, December 18, 1891, Image 7

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn00065154/1891-12-18/ed-1/seq-7/

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!j the V It will lie strictly a
«fdfoml ipss encumbered by es
predecesaors. The
fjt,
im
BU
fair, careful and
r^11^ n-a M'cur.'il the approval of
Jaud^a\ h-ivt* followed them with
l(,
Cur«fUiU
wl,®htsan
,*
iiitorest. The up-
aQd
n°nV.rl io the early completion
j]u**r*" thp
ceH.sa7
!!f the*" authorized vol-
PublffivVr' I" »lm(J
ur
*'iieh L'
to
S('cun,' ak'uinSt
^•g,r..L«e the cost and
!l"nui.„.s
tl at the
S'MjevuU®urise»ofl.
«1
r- a the'Vondition of the terr.
'h ired with the states the
li:'V'inn
rlllu'ts
an1
Pr",brm«
areas
into cultivation by ex
This work is
'or local corporations
ir in
r,»iy°
/r'Vrripdiii? c-anals.
'L individuals o
by
.vstem which a full prelim
let t"ilt suDPlv and of the ir
Tjr
of New Mexico. Ari-
i]s would
w
ier^!'•'.V,-'in-iVt*'r'i:t' LM'iiwtii and in
irdciieiuli
ry larsely depen
•l'P,'v lt'L'islatioii. either
IfflWl 'V\' l.itir
|(»n legislatures.
wate
nt upon
by congress
rci,r ulatin the distri
ini)lv furnished by their
EottHew.itw'
t,,
u' but
Pl'Ot-ft t,ir
'rr
l('atl°n
of ),
iUion f...
tion for
seom!,)"(
Id
t, certa
Pos«e
,d o' X'
he"
is much hm-.-r ne«-
»"r-SSW*"
1
v:
'oi
"vr «"T
of
f"
th', ,,,1,7"'Illn
Mentees of the arid lands will
r*id of the water companies. The
l1"1'8 jLJantin^ friinchis's
of
('Ilorrnous
^ft'nmm.ense to the state or nni
jctiifflit they proceed and with
P-VCtei-Uon of the public interest s
F1,Sable and flagrant evil of mod
IciftaoiK-
Mly I
id
|t shoU
n
yt be com-
r&g «i'h subject that will be
nvyears affect, so vitally housauds of
i
l°')'«uppr®"*'on ,*0'vKamjr'
lUffe, lr(
ren Jr.-.
ffrati'i
'•'I :ea
re.fi
who n...„
i»e
•'"Us t„.
Indian
rest ,'
place
l. "ition of congress for the repression
n-i has affr vears of resistance on
fcthe Mormons, at last brought them
"ion that resistance is unprotit
iin-ivailinij. The power or engross
fe«"biect should not be surrendered un
LhKf sitisfactory evident-#! that 'he pj-o
to be created would exercise
over this sub-
,i.hf states to
-aciusive power of the state
(J me same way
1 government for Alaska.
Lanend that provision be mule for the
[Son of a simple form of town 1'overtv
in Alaska with power to regulate sueh
fat* usually ia the fetatos uudcr
jicipi' contr.d.
Thf Agricultural D-partmebt*
,hf Hablishment of the department of
regarded by anyone as a mere
I'lln to the unenlightened niatid of a
'c:s» tf people, that impression has
factual!V removed by th «reat re
LrcaJv attained lt- home influence has
Terrtreat in disseminating ai-rieultural
Iho'iicuiTur-.il information: in stimulating
idirectiDi.':l further diversification of crops
IfclKCKWiil eradicating diseas«-s of domes
and more than all. in the close
I informal rontaet which it has stablished
ijiirained with the fnrmers aiid stock
,»B6!ihe whole country. Kvery request
.jjliBfjoa has had prompt attention and
in»Wt merited consideration. The sci
tcKpof the department is a high
itis pushing its investigations with
luUsihuslasm.
Meat Inspection.
Intwrtion by this department of cattle
l«t products intended for shipment
jrfUbeen the basis of the success which
jtfWlfdcur efforts to secure the removal
Jlfiirtrictions maintained by the European
Kits. For ten years protests and pe
kthis subject from the packers and
IrjisfrsOf tbe United Slates have been
igtinsl these restrictions, which so
Oily limited our markets and curtailed the
l« of the farm. It is a source of general
Volition that success has at last been
lined, for tbe effect of an enlarged
market for these meats will be
not only l»y the farmer, but in our pub
^fisances and in every branch of trade.
Our Great lrah» Crop.
liegrtincrop of this year w as the largest
loar history, 50 per cent, greater than that of
It year, and yet the new markets that have
openvd and the lartie demand resulting
short crops in Europe have sustained
tops to fiu-h an extent that the enormous
plus of meats and breadstuffs will te mar
p'"l at good prices, bringing relief and pros
ri'.y to an industry that was much de
|fis"d. The value of the grain crop of the
"d States is estimated bv the secretary to
fttiis year fry.*),(no,(Mi more than last of
flW.O»,(^jo more, ami of all products of
arm I'.O.iXiO.tKK) more. It is not inapnro
jsate, 1
think, here to suggest that our satis
K'.,on in the i-ontemolation of this marvelous
Iteion to th* national wealth is unclouded
uny suspicion of the currency by which it is
kwsr.rprt unci in which the farmer" is paid for
Jit product of his fields.
The Civil Sr-rvlce.
Th?report of the civil service commission
lreceive the careful attention of the op
]mw!s as well us the friends or this reform,
|"ii' .'iinmisij.n invites a personal inspection
I«!viators and representatives of its records
iw methods, ana every fair critic will feel
-ilea an examination shou'd precede judg-
J''it of condemnation either of the syst
^ministration. It is not claimed that
«!h"r perfect, but I believe, that
f. li* has been executed with impar
ity, and that tho system is incomparably
Wrand fairer than that of appointments
jHUvor. I have during the year extended
i'4«.assitied service to includc superintend
®J-teichers, matrons and physicians in the
service. This branch the service is
"V!related to educational and philauthro
aud will obviously be the better for
Wfiuiic. The heads of the several execu
jl?.'apartments have been directed to es
aTi
at once
an et'dcient record as
basis of a comparative rating of
jj^rks within the classified service with a
t0
Placing promotions therein upon the
•'"pf merit. 1 am contident that such a
fairly kept and open to the in--pei tion
w°seinterested, will powerfully stimulate
°'tho departments and will be ac
•jPKd by all as placing the troublesome matter
I, Promotions upon a just basis. 1 reeom-
Mthatth appropriations for the civil serv
rr,.»!',|?mis,i(|n be made adequate to the lu-
,(i
*ork of the next tiscal year.
Safety Appliances for Hallways.
,JT twice before urgently called the atten
fftrtJ1
Con«r(,ss
t° the necessity of legislation
iln-'® Protection of the livi-s of railroad em
)es, but nothing has yet been done. Duviug
*er«i.»r
cr'ding
June :W, 1K«. :m t.rai eiuen
coimiii and 7.*M1 maimed while engaged in
Jf,'n?rars. The total number or ra.lroad
t'ic' killed during the vear was S,4M. and
number injured-J^,.• ((». This is a cruel and
nc'd!efs sacritk-e. The government, is
the u*
li0
lfly
fl.0,0,000 aunuallv to save
VfHi shipwrecked seamen every
(mif. I rigidly inspected and re
tafitv
i!dopt
0llr
m,'thod
the most approved
sliai •u,at)',1'a,iees. All this is good, but how
fwt. «xcme their lack of interest and ef
whdi. "ilif of this army of brave young men
Hcf.j
a,,racted
l.
bv a iopul:ir vote upon a general licket, anrt
for nearly thirty years this method was uni
versal. After a fuli test of other methods, with
out''im'rx-rtaul division or dissent in any state,
and without any purpose of p^V advantage,
us we must believe, but solely upon the con
siderations that uniformity was desirable
and that a neral election in territorial divi
sions not subject to change, was most consist
ent with the popular character of our institu
tions best preserved the equality of the voters,
and perfectly removed the choice of president
from the baneful itiliuenee of the "Kerry
mander" the practice of all the states was
broir'bt into harmony. That this concurrence
sho.iTd now be broken is, think, an linfor
tuuato and even threatening episode, and one i
that may well suggest whether states that still
give tueir approval to the old and prevailing
method ought not to secure, by a constitutional
amendment, a practice which has the approval
°*The recent Michigan legislation provides for
choosing what are popularly known as the eon
oressional electors for president by eongres
sional districts, and the two senatorial electors
by district s created for that purpose. This leg
j,slat ion was, of course, accompanied by anew
congressional upporlionni'-nt aud the two stat I
utes' bring the electoral vote of the state under
the influence of the ••i/errymatider." These
gerrymanders for co: pro
.signal purposes are
in most cases liuttres.-.. by a gerrymander of i
the legislative districts, thus making it impes
sible for a majority of the legal voters of tho i
state to correct the apportionment ar:d equalize
the congressional districts. A minority rule is
established that only a political convulsion can
overthrow.
An election implies a body of electors having
prescribed qu liticati ns. each one of whom
has an equal value and influence in deterniin
ing the result. So when the constitution pro
vides that "each state shall appoint" (elect), I
-in such manner as the legislature thereof
may direct, a number of electors, etc.." an
unrestricted power was not given to the legis- i
laturc s in the selection of the methods to be
used. "A repuiiean form of government" is
guaranteed by the constitution to each state,
and the power given by the same
instrument to the legislatures o*
the states, to escribe methods for
the choice by tbe state of electors, must be ex-
ereised under that limitation. Tho essential
features of such a government are the right of
tbe people to ehoos their own officers and the
nearest practicable equality of value in the
suffrages given in determining that choice It
will not be claimed that the power given to the
legislature would support a law providing that 1
the persons receiving the smallest vote should
be the electors or a law that allows that the,
electors should be chosen by the voters of a
sin? e congressional district. The stale Is to
choose, and under the pretense of r. gulaling
methods the legislature can neither vest the
right of choice elsewhere nor adopt, methods
not conformable to republican instilutions. I
The ierryman«ler Must
It is not my purpose here to discuss theques
tion whether a choice by the legislature or by
the voters of equal single dis'riots is a choice i
by the slate, but only to rccomm -nd such regu
lations of this matter bv constitutional amend
ment which will secure uniformity and prevent
that disgraceful partisan jugglery to which
such a liberty of choice, if it exists, offers a
temptation. Nothing just now is more iinpor
tnnt than to provide every guaranty for the
absolutely fair and free choice bv an equal suf
frage within the respective states of all the
others of the national governments, whether
that suffrage is applied directly, as in the
choice of members of the house of represents
tives. or indirectly, as in the choice ot senators
and electors of president. Kespect for public
officers and obedience to law will not cease to
be the characteristics of our people until our
elections cease to declare the will of majorities
fairly ascertained, without fraud, suppression
or gerrymander.
Our Chief National Hanger.
If I were called upon to declare wherein oui
chief national danger lies, I should say, without
hesitation, in the overthrow of majority con
trol by thp suppression or supervision of the
popular suflrage. That there is real danger
here all must agree, but the energies of those
who see it have been chiefly expended in try
ing to t:x responsibility upon the opposite
party, rather than in efforts to make such prac
tices impossible by either party.
Is it not possible now to adjourn that inter
minable arid inconclusive debate while we take,
by consent, one step in the direction reform
by eliminating the gerrymander which has
been denounced by all part its, as an influence
in the selection of electors of president and
members of congress*
1
Frauds Against the Suffrage.
An attempt was n:ale in the last con- i
gresH to bring to bear the constitutional pow
ers of the general government for the cor
rection of frauds against the suffrage. Itis.m
portant t« know whether the opposition to such
measures is reallv vested in particular atuivs
supposed to be objectionable or includes any
proposition to give to the ejection laws of the
United States powers adequate to the correc
tion of grave and acknow-,euge 1 evils. 1 must
yet entertain the hope that it Is possible to se
cure a calm, patriotic consideration of such
constitutional or statutory changes as may be
necessary to secure the choice of the olllcers of
the government to the jv-tple by fair appor
tionmems and free elect io :s.
I have a lud to the gerrymander an affect
ing the method of selecting eieeior of presi
dent by congressional districts, but the pri
marv inteni ami effect of Hii« lorni of po.itie.il
robbery have rt 'a'aon t.. the select ton ot mem- i
of re.ires-ntatives. 1 he
ieal with this
ibuse. The un- i
tin lions-
power of eongres-: is ample
threatening and intolerable
failing test of sincerity in election reform will
be found in a willingness to enter as to rem
edies arid t» nut. into force mu ii measures as
will most effectually preserve the right of peo
ple to free and equal representation.
A Commission Needed.
I believ s it would be possible to constitute a
commission, non-partisan in its tuaiiakeisnip
and composed of patriotic, wise and nnp.u .ial
men, to whom a consideration of the
of the evils connected with our election
and methods might be committed with a good
prospect of securing unanimity in some plan
for removing or mitigating these eyi s. 1
he
o n s i u i o n w o u e i a e
commission to be vested the
court if that metjiod would gue the
best guaranty of impartiality. This commis
sion should be charged with tie auty of
inquiring into the who e subject cftlic .a%\ of
election* as related to the choic of ollicers of
the national government with a view to secur
\n to verv el ctor a free and unmolested ex
e -c se of the suffrage and as near an approach
o an equality of value in each ba 1 cast as is
attainable. While the policies of the general
L'overrment up n the tariff, ir on the u
tion of our merchant, marit e npon_ river and
harbor Improvements and other such i.t.iiw.is
!r, .nd general concern are liable
to be tnrued thfis way or that by the r,-suits
of coivressionat elections and administrative
poilciM sometimes invoking issues that tend
to peace or war, to be Uirne lhis
by the results of a Presi'leinuU elea oti. th re
is a rightful interest, ill all the st.iti.h
••very'congressional district, that will
deceived or silenced
tense that the qui
b.idv of legal
n any congres^ioni
their suffrages
questions is i
ceru or control.
any
'and of o turnerce are being sacri-
ry
iuirin!
year by e continued use of anti-
a,i'"1
cuinm«
dangeio.is applianci »t A law re
('V('rv
por ,^r.ce
railrouil engage,! in interstate
lh,f
eJani..
''quit ment each year of a given
of its
rale ulfallv
freight cars with atr.omatie
v"rv-iT aif
brakes, would very soon and
r,'dnee
the present
fearful death
among railroad employes.
l'resiilentlal Klector®.
flp,,.®
of appointment by the states of
ttcenn President and vice president is
o!» h!V
renewed interest t«y reason
tu\5®Partilre by the state of Michigan from
lhe«»:hoawhi'h had become uniform in al
1*™ I 1rior to 18.'W various methods had
th»a,
bV
the different states and even bv
bv®t! state. In some the choice was mado
'e^'lsiature, ia others electors were
"listnets, but more generally by the
1'U L°
tle
whole state upon n general ticket.
1 "-"venn-Ht toward the adoption of the
i method 1 ad an early be
ttllf nn.l i i.. ,.1
o&d,and conformed to" the practice of the
»Uu.
tateH-
For nearly sixty years all the
n **ve one have appointed iueir electois
and in
not be
hy t.ie audacious pre
dion of the rij-'lit of
voters in iinv state
1 ciMrlct to give
force upon these general
matter of tnly local con
The demand That the lunitn-
nV," ence ^"the Vines of justice and human
it'y not of prejudice and cruelty.
tt-rtuin the (hdusio^ that our p^op^-
laws and to civil magistrates
Conclusion.
glorious than
•.inr.izcment s.
template the
streiiK'h of our country.
in Its inliaeuee upon our pcop.e
ttinoi
rcpre
to
THE TWO DAK0TA8.
NORTH DAKOTA.
New County Olllcinls.
The election in Williams eonrity, N.
D.. for temporary organization result
ed in tlic unanimous clioie- of Willis
ton for county seat. Gustavo Antler
son, W. 1). I'arsliall and Daniel Harris
were elected co-nmissioners H. V.
Smith, register of deeds T. F^. Harda
way, county clerk: Louis Scliirbeck,
clerk of court linton Iledderich,
treasurer John Hett'ernan, sheriff J.
P. Denoyer, state's attorney, and
Mrs. J. M. Kurjfh. superintendent of
schools.
A Wheat Buyer Skips Out.
For some months past J- •Sidebothnm
has represented S. S. Linton «fe Co., of
Dulutli, as a local wheat buyer at llills
boro, N. I), lie has shipped several
car loads in his own name and started
for England without making returns.
S. llobineau loses S"'K) aud several
other farmers smaller amounts.
Sew* in Urtef.
Everything points to a big immigra
tion movement toward the Red river
valley in Nort Dakota next season.
A large gathering of odd fellows met
in Jamestown, N. D., and organized
Unity encampment of the order.
In North Dakota II. Tnfford has been
appointed postmaster at Arrow wood,
Stutsman county G. M. liroome at
IJoynton, Dickey county, and W. H.
Graham at Fort Yates, lioreman coua
ty.
A farmer named Johnson attempted
to cross Lake Eckelson, near Fargo. N.
D., with twelve persons on the wagon.
The ice was tJiiu and the team went
through and was drowned, but all the
persons were saved.
Burglars stole $500 worth of clothing
from A. Appel & Co.'s store in East
Grand Forks. N. D.
Burfflars broke into the store of A.
G. Evans at Lisbon, N. D., and tootc
about $1,000 worth of coats, fur go.xls,
etc.
The residence1 of Robert Mann at
Hancock, X. D.. was totally destroyed
by fire. No insurance.
A ('.rand Forks (N. D.) editor has
bought a new pair of three
dollar pants
and says: "The newspaper business in use to a
North Dakota bears evidence of un-
usual prosperity."
W. E. Low lost two blooded stallions
valued at 81,000 each, six horses, all of
his stables and about 400 tons of hay
by a prairie fire in McLean county,
N. D.
taken off. i
At Ellendale, N. D., Herbert T. Cole
was found guilt of betraying Anna
Sidell under promise of marriage and
sentenced to nine months in the peni
tentiary and to pay a fine of S100.
SOUTH DAKOTA.
Kymlglit Destroyed by a How.
A distressing accident happened to
John Mignus at Meet wood, S, D. Mig
nus was loading some pigs from a pen
in which was the parent sow. The sow
became enraged, and as Mignus stooped
to lift a pig the animal struck at him
with her mouth, the tusk penetrating
the left eye and going entirely through
the bail. The eyeball was removed in
the hope of saving the sight of the un
injured member.
Captured ATter Thirteen Years.
Frank Palmer, a soldier, who in 1878
murdered Paul Tremame, an Indian
scout, near Fort Sully, S. D., is now at
the .Cheyenne Iliver agency. S. I)., to
stand trial. Palmer was captured some
days ago in lJonham, Tex. Palmer dis
appeared after the murder, and from
that day to his recognition in lion ham
a few days ago he could not be found,
though every effort
ture him.
,1'U,T1®
at
Sliort News Item*.
A mill to use the Me Arthur A Forest
process for the reduction of re factory
ores mav be built at Dead wood, S. D.
Fire at Armour, S. I)., destroyed a
livery stable containing one span of
mules and a large amount of wheat
stored. Loss about $1,5JO.
Some Deadwood (S. T).) citizens
were trying to get Francis Murphy to
hold a series of temperance meetings
there.
At Sioux Falls, fis. D., Judge Aikens
granted Eugene P. Palmer, of Chicago,
I decree of divorce from his wife Oil
the ground of desertion.
The new broom factory at Chamber
lain, S. 1)., is in operation.
Edward Rowe drowned himself in
Scof river, 3 miles from Elk Point, S.
D. He developed signs of insanity a
short time before committing the deed.
Mrs. George Crane, a prominent re
ligious worker, died at Vermillion, S. D.
1- for supremacy as we con-i The (Jrsind opera house at Huron, S.
population, wealth and moral owned by Oliver P. Helm, was sold
we:ilth and moral
A trust, momentous
mid 1.non the
ind
ion—
mrt
and
BKNJAMIN HAUUjSUX.
Executive Majphoh,
to eastern capitalists for $15,000.
The Farmers' Alliance has purchased
the general merchandise store of O. J.
l'eterson at Vermillion, S. 1)., and
they propose to do a strictly cash busi­
ness.
Dec. w, W9L
Relation of Hunger to Infeetlon.
There is a popular notion to the
effect that a person is more likely to
take a contagious disease when the
stomach is empty. Although this fact
seems to be well established by expe
rience. nevertheless it has never been
established as a scientific fact until re
cently. Experiments which have lately
been made upon pigeons by two Italian
P'V
ysieians, demonstrate beyond any
reasonable doubt that hunger is favor
able to the activity of the infectious
element, whatever it may be. Pigeons
that had been starved were found to be
very susceptible to the contagion of
inthrax, although when well fed they
are not at all subject to this disease.
It thus appears that hunger in some
way lessens the ability of the body to
iefend itself from the attack of disease
gvrms. Possibly this may be in part
due to the fact that when a person is
hungry there is no gastric juice in the
stomach, so that the protective influ
ence of this digestive influence is lost.
Then, too, the lowering of the vital
powers as the result of hunger, lessens
the resistance of the cells of the body
in jjeneral.—Western RuraL
She Only One Kver Printed—Can Yon Find
the Word?
Th^rc is a 3 inch display advertisement
in tiiis paper, this week, which has no two
words alike except one word. The same is
true of each new one appearing caeh week,
from The I)r. Han or Medicine Co. This
house places a "Crescent'' on everything
thev make and publish. Look l'or it, send
them the name of the word and they will
return you book, beautiful lithographs or
samples free.
Jaosox says it puzzles him to think that a
standing advertisement must run all the
time.—Klnura Gazette.
Floored.
Dyspepsia is easily floored by Hostetter's
Stomach Bitters, *pin'st, pleasantest of
stomachics, most effective of tonics. Heart
burn. flatulence, the "sinking" sensation in
the nit of the stomach experienced by dys
peptics, in brief, all symptoms and thev are
many and perplexing—of indigestion are
banished by the Bitters, which is particu
larly efficacious for biliousness, malaria,
rheumatism and kidney complaints.
A MAmrx's dressmaker is the only on©
Who finds a miss lit suits her customer.—
Baltimore American,
Corons and Coi.ns. Those who are suf
fering from Coughs. Colds. Sore Throat,
etc.. should try Brown's Buonxuial
Tuocncs. Sold only in boxes.
Thk study of bee culture is of no earthly
who has the hives.—Pitti-
raan
bur'^rli
was made
Dispatch
Foktify
Charles Heglin, while oiling machin
ery at the Fargo (N. D.) rolling mill
had his right arm caught in the gear
ins? and so badly torn that it id to be Why you want something done.
to
cap-
joite.v's official plurality. cllects,
The South Dakota state
Pierre and canvassed the election
returns of the special election of Con
gressman Jolley on November 4 as fol
lows: The total vote cast was 9.400,
Jolley receiving 17.(511: Smith, 14,587
Wood, 7,1110, making Jolley's plurality
8,027.
Feeble Lungs Against Winter
with Hale's lloney of Horehound and Tar.
Pike's Toothache Drops Cure
in one minute.
Tnn parting words of your barber are
generally: "Which side,pleaseYonkers
Statesman.
ton't fool with indigestion nor with a
disordered liver, but take Beecham'a PUls
for immediate relief. 2.» cents a box.
JJr.vEK hue a person who wants to know
Milwaukee
Journal.
4.
ONE ENJOYS
Both the method and results xvhen
ISyrup
tmd
of Figs ia taken it is pleasant
refreshing to the taste, and acts
gently yet promptly
011
the Kidneys,
jXiver and Bowels, cleanses the sys
tem effectually, dispels colds, head
I ficlies
and fevers and cures habitual
constipation. Fyrup
of Figs is the
only remedy^ of its kind ever pro-
duced, pleasing to the taste and
ceptablo
its
it.
Beauty^Polish.
SayingLabor,
I
al­
to tli3 stomach, prompt
action and truly beneficial
in
its
prepared only from the most
board met healthy and agreeable substances, its
many excellent qualities commend it
to all and have
inado
it the most
popular remedy known.
Syrup of Figs is for sale In
and
SI
bottles by all leading drug­
gists. Any reliable druggist who
may not have it on hand will pro
cure
it promptly for
any one who
wishes to
try
Do not accept any
substitute.
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAM FRANCISCO, CAL,
IMWILIE. A S'. /^tv yon*. n.¥
S O O N E W S
^FfinTHEMILLiOKSOFCOWS'JMERSCF^i
Tntt'
pais
s
It trives Dr. Tutt picture to an- A
9
nounce Isat he Is n»«' putting up a w
•TINT LIVER FILL*
which is of exeeedlnsjly small si/.e, yet
B& retaining all tho virtues of the larger
ones, Thev aro guaranteed purely
A veifetiihle. "Both sizes of these pills A
are still issued. The exact size of W
TL'TT'S T1XY I.1VKB PILLS 0
is shown in the b»»rder of this "ad."
BORE
THE
W E S
with onr i'uinoUH W ell
r»lucliincrv. Tho only
J*rfert
Ff If-oleamtiB itnl
cleanliness.
Durability&Cheapness.Unequalled.
No
Odor
When
u
Heated.
f9
inherit some tendency to Dys
pepsia from my mother.
I
suffered
two years in this way consulted
number of doctors. They
a
did
me
no good.
I
then used
Relieved In your August Flower
aud it was just two
days
when
I
felt great relief.
got so that
I
I
felt that
three years ago, and
fontaijie
I
soon
could sleep and eat, and
I
was well. That was
I
am still first-
class.
I
Two Days. without
am never
a bottle, and
if
I
feel constipated
the least particle a dose or two of
August Flower does the work. The
beauty of the medicine is, that you
can stop the use of it without any bad
effects on the system.
Constipation While
I
was sick
seemed to me a man could feel.
was of all men most miserable.
say, in conclusion, that
August Flower
I
felt
everything it
I
I
can
I
believe
will
cure anyone of
indigestion, if taken
Life of Misery with judgment.
A.
M.
Weed,
229 Belle-
St., Indianapolis, Ind."
0
PROP-A-CATE
Health, wealth and happiness
economically.
by
owning a "Ciiartek Oak." Stove.
None other will bring you such
a
maximum of contentment and com
fort, nor do its duties as well or
as
Host stove dd&lers koep them. If youn
does not, write direct to manufacturers.
EXCELSIOR MANUFACTURING CO.
ST. LOUIS. MO.
BOILING WATER OR MILK.
EPPS'S
GRATEFUL-COBJIFORTING.
O O A
LABELLED 1-2 LB. TINS ONLY.
kates, Scroll
s1
Saw
S
MAGIC LANTERNS,
Photo Outfits, Air Rifles.-
4J/I
tf Sl'IVii for Il,I.rSTRATEl CATAI.OGl K
The J. WILKINSON CO., 269 Stats St., Chicago.
tar.NAMK TUijj VAl'£K ivitj (una you writ®.
APEUTC W AMTEH TO
AutNIo MIUTIIAMI.RII Af
fl||
I ('»m|«nal. the (ireat fysaem 'l'onio
aint Ktseiimatie Keinedv. uinJ tilivene
the •"peeit.' f'r Kemiile lineHt"'. l.tir^o eahh |iri/.os.
I'mrttee Isrx free
Jackson *-t'o Coluiiiuiih.O.
NAM It TH
18 PAPER •••ry iita« yo« writ®.
ASTHMA
50c
I Wu Want Name aad
Address of Every
ASTHMATIC
P.Harold Hares,M.D.
CURED TO STAY CURED. BUFFALO. M. Y.
i. lilla PAl'tKcniJ I'.aw loa
SS5 MALTESE WHISKEY i^'K
tion, Mahii'in nml rn »l I'ehility. A:ifrOf
IsU. I. "r f»r Al.TKSK I'll KM !l A I. CO. SU r»uL Itiu
aa-.\AMK Tills r*l £11 »»«7
,inM
T®"1 "»••«.
q« •fifiyvAljuickl ob-ained. N» atty's
g\ I Cslv I fee until paiti'ntisallowi-tl.Ad*
ViC Him !lc k tree, (ihibe I'Hlent Ajjc'y, Wash., U. O.
CVNAStE THIS PAl'ER«WJ tim» jooTtlU.
DCUCinUC Tliousafirts made liappy. Sol(tirs,
fendiuna Svui w*nri/ lleii-M. Advice KKI5K.
VV lite 111 \V .111111
nj11 'i.,'liiiitro or 1'H. uilelijljlB,
E THIS l'APEll«»«»J tiu« jmi nrllfc
Wuntcil wtiole or parr, time salary and
-*ppne». l'erniaiient place. Apply at "nae.
Rr.iwn Itro». '«».. '.hi ith ave., OliiCAJtO.
gyNAVC THIS 1'AVBB «wjr tim.*«• writ*.
£1AUC SIIDV. Hook-keepintr. lVnmanship. Aritll
||l|pj||^ luetic. Shorthand,etc.. thorousfhly taught
j'mntl. Tr!»! Imonn fret. Hi-Taut A Str»»toD, Balialo, A, I.
t^-XAMC THIS PAPER trtrj ttaw Jm frtl.
MOT
Poultry
WELL
DRILL
abt-lroppin)tKil«iii use __
LOOM IS & N YMAN,
0L
5Set
,f!°*
and Pel
OPIUM
"OHIO''
ue
tirna. ohio. wit*.
StortClup11""7*^Kt«elt|pure
cheap. Write It. MASON, KlltKSVll.I-lS. M.O.
NAM! THIS PAFEE •Mijtim.jouniit*.
Morphine Hal»!t Cured In JO
to 20 d'M'M. No way till urca.
DR. J.STEPHENS, Lebanon.Ohio*
Piso's Remedy for C.'iti.rrh is the
I Best, Kasiest to Use, and hoapest.
Sold bv dru'.'fri.-ts or scit by mail.
Mc. K. T. Hazeiune, Warren, l'u.
A N. K.—G. 1874.
WHEN WBIT1N6 TO AI»VEItTI»ER8 PLKA8K
•late that yal M« tbe Advertisement la Ult
M«er.

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