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The herald-advance. (Milbank, S.D.) 1890-1922, July 08, 1921, Image 7

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn00065154/1921-07-08/ed-1/seq-7/

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•3
Writer Took Harriman's Advice and
Studied the Erie Lins Before
Writing About It.
Some 15 years ago John E. Cnra
fter. us a financial writer for the Wall
8treet News Bureau, was assigned to
cover the office and affairs of the late
E .H. Mnrriiiian. He once boldly beard
ed Mr. Harriman upon what financing
was in stone for the Krie railroad.
"What do you know about the Erie?"
WMpp-d the irrcat financier.
•"Everytliing," assured the youthful
aspirant for information, adding:
"Why, Mr. Uarriman. I have ridden
over it—to Patersou, N. J., and Nyuck,
K. Y."
••What!" roared Mr. Harriman. "You
jo at once to President Underwood
of the Erie, tell him 1 sent vou, and ^et
transportation to cover the entire
system. Then you go out and leiirn
something about the Erie. Come and
*ee me when you return and I will
answer your questions."
Mr. Caraher Erie-ed for a fortnight
and after again seeing Mr. Hairiman
wrote an Erie article that was well
worth reading.
Around the Clock.
"Yes, boys," continued the steep
lejack, vim was teliing "true" and
thrilling stories, "yes. I was working on
u clock tower one afternoon about 32
minutes to G. when I s-lipped, slid down
the roof and caught on the long hand
of the clock. There I dangled while
the town folks collected below. So I
yells to 'em. "8ay, you folks, go home
to your suppers. It'll he close to half
an hour before I drop."—Houston
Post.
Csr-Wreckt.
A1 Bert—"How do these love tri
angles usually end?" I'hil Bert—
"Most of them turn into a wreck
tangle."—Science and Invention.
Before calling a -man a liar, be sura
goti are right—then don't.
CASTORIA
For Infants and Children.
Mothers Know That
Genuine Castoria
Always
Bears the
Signature
of
Exact Copy of Wrapper. TMC CENTAUR COMPANY, NEW TONK CIT».
GOT ACQUAINTED WiTH ROAD PUT BABY IN SECOND PLACE
If you have reason to oelieve, as
many have, that a change from
coffee or tea would be wise,try
POSTUM CEREAL
You'll find what thousands of
others have found—complete sat
isfaction to taste, and freedom
from harm to nerves or digestion
When coffee or tea disturbs, it's
easy to^
with Postum
"There's a Reason"
Sold by grocers
everywhere
Hade by
Battle Creek,rocn.
lo
Use
For
Over
Thirty Years
Small Sister Would Be All Right, Said
Little Miss, but Oh You Player
Piano!
A five-year-old Vailburgh miss la
enamored of the baby next door. Yes
terday she interviewed her mother
subject, the practicability of having a
baby sister of her own. The mother
was sympathetic, but pointed out that
babies are expensive.
"How much would a baby cost V"
asked the five-year-old.
"Oh, 1 don't know just bow much,
hut a great deal," her mother an
swered.
"As much as a player-piano i" the
youngster pursued.
"Ye--, more than a player-piano," was
the answer.
Then said the young miss decisively,
"I think we'd better get a puiye*?
piano."—Newark News.
Are Corns a Luxury!
When is a luxury tax? Representa
tive Aaron S. Kreider tells this story
A woman went into a restaurant and
ordered a plate of ice cream, and when
she came to pay, slie had a check for
15 cents and 2 cents was added to it.
She asked: "What does that 2 cents
mean
V"
"Well," she was told, "35 cents for
your, ice cream and 2 cents luxury
tax.'
She paid it, and then she walked
across the street to the drug story and
asked for a corn plaster, and she got
a check for Id cents, and 1 cent added.
She said: "What is the 1 cent for?"
"Thai is the luxury tax."
"Well," she sa!d, "this is the first
time I ever knew that corns were a
luxury."
Now that is the way it goes. There
are a great many things to be con
sidered in discussing tax propositions
—From the Nation's Business.
Will \bu Have A Lift"
When you are discouraged and think
that there »s no use trying, then get
busy!
THREATEN CROPS
IN MANY STATES
Vigorous Measures Against At
tack of Chinch Bugs Art
Urged by Federal Bureaus
MISSOURI REPORTS OUTBREAK
Severe Infestations In Central Missis.
sippi Valley Region From Texas
Northeasterly to IlliiWetl
and Michigan.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.!
Energetic measures against the
chinch hugs which threaten injury not
only to the wheat and rye crops of
Missouri but to corn as well are
urged by the bureau of entomology.
United States Department of Agricul
ture, in view of reports of an impend
ing outbreak of the pest in that state.
Widespread and severe infestations
of the pes*! are reported in the whole
central Mississippi valley region,
starting in northern Texas and ex
tending in a northeasterly direction
over Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri,
touching Nebraska, and expending
across Illinois and Indiana into Mich
igan.
Generally Distributed Through State.
The chinch 1 ugs. latest advices say,
have hud a mild winter and are gen
erally distributed throughout the
Missouri wheat and rye fields, breed
ing in considerable numbers in the
St. Louis neighborhood early in May.
The farmers, it is said, hqve been
watching the pest more closely than
usual this spring, but all of them do
not know yet that there is danger that
their corn may be damaged worse
than normal last yeaf. Wheat is
likely to ripen one or two weeks
earlier this year, and the rains have
delayed the planting of corn
The bugs are certain to migrate
when the wheat ripens and the com
will be so backward that damage by
tlie hugs is likely to be very severe.
It fs well to expect the bugs to begin
migrating to corn as soon as the wheat
butts begin to harden into maturity
ten days before the heads are ripe.
Any harrier work or ereosov repellant
line work should begin as the hugs
will migrate in increasing numbers as
the wheat stalk ripens upward. The
binder will shake loose those not al
ready out ^aiid stragglers will continue
to migrate In serious nEmbers for five
fits
5WV
THE HERALD ADVANCE
v/
*k%v
iu
4--. ... ....
Healthy Field of Wheat.
to jflfteen days after bureau Bar
riers, therefore, must be maintained
from the time of migration until pos
sibly two or three weeks have elapsed.
Sow a Trap Crop.
It will be found of much value to
sow two drill widths of millet between
corn and the nearby fields of wheat
and rye. The more quickly this is
done the better, so as to make as good
growth as possible of this trap crop
before the bugs attack It. When the
bugs have migrated into the trap
crop it should be pl*wed seven or
more inches deep. Care must be
taken to plow deeply and well, then
to pack the ground with a drag or
harrow or roller. Little time or wort
is required to make ibis strip and the
cost rs small. It has hitherto been
found very profitable.
SEPARATE PENS FOR POULTRY
Not a Wise Plan to Keep Geese, Ducks,
Chickens and Turkeys Together
in Same Yard.
It pays to keep each variety of poul
try to itself. Ducks and geese will
foul a hen yard geese will drive away
all others at feeding time and hog
everything, while young turkeys may
be killed by hens and roosters. A
separate lot for each is best, and will
soon pay for itself in quicker growing
sti,.k. In addition, it is more conveni
ent to handle each when kept to itself.
Usually all that is necessary is an in
dividual feeding yard.
WATER OF MUCH IMPORTANCE
Factor in Development of Poultry
on Free Range—Adequate
Supply Needed.
The watering of the free range poul
try «s an Important factor in their de
velopment. Allowing birds to be with
out water for a few hours on a hoi
summer day will seriously injure them
and retard growth. The water 8ippl\
must
toe
adequate.
5*
DEMONSTRATE SOUND
FARMING PRACTICES
Excellent Work Done by Pennsyl*
vania Pig-Club Members.
Boys and Girls Prove That Good Hoot
Properly Fed and Cared For Do
Better Than Common Stock
With Ordinary Care.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
That hoys and girls can demon
strate the best farm practices In
their respective communities is shown
conclusively by reports of the work
done by Pennsylvania club members
in 1920. Statistics of pig-club mem
bers may be taken as an example.
It Is estimated by men who know
something about the swine industry
in this state that the average daily
erain of all hogs In the saute—good,
bad and indifferent—Is about one
•HI???
^Pig-Club Members Exhibiting Their
Prize Pigs at State Fair.
half pound per day. How do you
think the club records compare with
that? Guess before you read on.
Club members in the pig-fecding
club (producing pork) made their pigs
gain 1.19 pounds, while those raising
gilts to breed put 1.1- pounds per day
on their pigs. That was a good dem
onstration that good pigs, properly
fed and cared for, will do much bet
ter tkuu common stock with ordinary
care. It pays, too, for the better re
sults can be obtained on the same
amount of feed.
Itohert Webster of the Huntersviib
Pig-Feeding club, Lycoming county, 1?
the state v»g-club champion as far as
gain per day is conrerned. Koberi
fed a purebred Poland China p!g
which gained 2.43 pounds per day
That pig surely dkl make a hog ou
of himself, didn't he?
TOWN HAS FUF.EBREDS ONLY
Ohio Township Is
V
1C0
Per Cent or
Right Side—No Grade or Scrub
Sires to Be Found.
The township of Jackson, in Hardin
county. »hio, is entirely free frorr
grade and scrub sires. In notifying
the United States Department of Agri
culture of this fact, Prof. John W
Wuichet of the Ohio agricultural ex
tension service, adds, "This is the firsi
township which has come to our atten
tion that we feel satisfied is 100 pel
cent on the right side. No sire was
considered purebred unless It could b«
proved that its sire and dam wen
registered."
V.he survey of sires Included th
principal classes of live stock, excep:
p». ?ltry, and was made for advance
cretit by a student in the college o!
agriculture. The survey showed that
the township included 105 farms, or
which were 21 purebred boars, 20
purebred rams, 6 purebred beef bulls
3 purebred dairy bulls, and 2 purebrec
stallions. No grade or scrub sires ol
any kind were found in the township
SPRAY FOR ALFALFA WEEVIL
Increased Production of One-Half Ton
to Acre Secured by Application
of Arsenate.
The county agent leader In Utah
reporting to the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture says the spray de
veloped by the office of cereal and for
age insect investigations, bureau of en
tomology, In the department has in
creased the production of the sprayed
over the unsprayed alfalfa fields by aa
average of one-half ton to the acre,
This spray is made of two to two and
one-half pounds of lead arsenate or
calcium arsenate to 1(H) gallons of wa
ter. It Is applied in a fine mist with a
power sprayer at the rate of 80 to 100
gallons to the acre. The state leader
says 351 farms were included in the
demonstration, which covered 10,113
acres. It Is estimated the saving ef
fected by this form of alfalfa control
amounted to $69,967.
CRITICAL PERIOD FOR P!G$
Young Animals Will Make Market
Hogs Only When Weaned With
out Checking Growth.
Pigs at eight or ten weeks of age
are just at the most critical period of
their lives. As a rule they will make
profitable market hogs only when they
are wenned without checking their
growth. With some kind of green for
»ge crops and self-feeders where they
can eat corn, wheat middlings and
tankage they will go through the
weaning period and scarcely miss the
milk they are getting from the sow
wbw she is stinoveg.
i
i
1&-.
LAND IN DEMAND
Why Western Canada Can Taks
tfer Pick of Settlers.
Opportunities and Conditions There
Appeal to the Most Desirable—Pos­
sibilities of Country Proved.
While Canada wants settlers, and Is
pursuing every legitimate means to
secure them, it is realized, as pointed
out by Hon. J. A. Calder, minister of
Immigration and colonization, that se
lection is necessary, and in order to
keep undesirables out of the country
legislation is passed that will doubt
less have this effect. As pointed out
by the minister, the class of settlers
which Canada stands most ready to
welcome are those who desire:
Opportunity to acquire good farm
land, either free of at a cost within
their means.
Opportunity to lire tn a country un
der healthful conditions and liberal
laws and among an intelligent and
friendly people.
Opportunity to lire In a country
where children receive free public edu
cation and where all children are en
ahled
to
start in the battle
of
life with,
as nearly as possible, equal
These are the conditions which will
appeal to the most desirable people
for this or any country. **mditio*is
which, to a certain degree, *»ake «U
automatic selection of the fittest.
Canada possesses farm l:\nds In
large areas which may be ha/1 free or 1
at a cost within the reach of the set- I
tier of limited means. Vast f*eas are
available for settlement within reason
able distances of railways. l*ind val
ues have In the last quarter
(T
still be secured in Its raw Hate at
reasonable prices Is an attraction.
Such lands today are probacy more
attractive to the settler than "tere the
free homesteads of the pioitver era.
The country has been tried out Its
possibilities have been proved: the
trails have been blazed: the founda
tions have been laid. Hailrofds, tele
phones and pubJic roads hfve been
provided market t^wns dot 'he prai
ries nnd other agricultural districts:
schools, churches, nnd all fh marks
of modern conditions of life abound.
Records which have been trtfen over
a period of years establish 'he fact
that Western Canada's grnin produc
tion is greater per acre thar that of
probably any other new counfy. It is
worthy of note that
tvJ
production of
grain per acte in many of tie older
countries has increased with the in
tensified farming methods w\ich the
very bigli cost of land made nfcessary.
This condition does not yet t^fain to
any extent in Canada, and yet the
yield compares favorably wPh some
such countries in which the cost of
land Is very much greater tHin It Is
In the farming districts of the Do
minion. In most cases present owners
of Canadian farm land who ?»re not
cultivating it themselves are willing
to
sejl
at moderate prices and on
terms arranged for the convenience of
the purchaser, provided that the pur
chaser is prepared to go into actual
operation and bring the land under
cultivation and cause it to produce.
That Is the kind of settler which Can
ada wants and to whom It extends
open arms.—Advertisement.
Positive and Comparative.
!uring a recent business men's con
vention In Chicago, one man ap
proached another in the lobby of a
hotel and by way of Introducing him
self. said:
"I'm Beck."
"That's good," replied the ad
dressed, taking the proffered hand.
"I'm more so."
"You're
what?" asked the
Can't Win.
A New York man had his pocket
picked in court. Going to court is a
losing game any way you look at it.—
Detroit Free Press.
Every year added to a man's life is
but another taken awav.
Got Skin Disease?
A great part of the maddening
and mortifying skin troubles that
plague humanity are due solely to
disorders of the blood. Relief from
these can be had only by removing
from your blood stream
the impurities that cause
the itching.
For this you must take
an internal blood remedy.
Outside applications have
no effect on the cause of
the torture. Their relief
is shftriMivctli Yon ucmst
9 -v ir: v5"/
4
i V
KILL RATS TODAY
By Using
Ike Gsnuin#
STEARNS'
ELECTRIC PASTE
TliPiniarantp^d for RM*.MIr«*,Gcliro»ch«e,
Ants and Watorbwm—th«" greatest kn wn carriers
of disease. Thfy destroy both food »nd
6 b- EXPRESS.
HAROLD SOMEF-S. ISO De
advan­
tages.
Opportunity to Jive in a country
where Industry applied to the land
will produce something more than the
bare necessities of life, and will afford
within reasonable time comfort and
Independence.
Opportunity to live in a couniry
where ambition Is not handicapied by
any creed, birth, or class, but where
every citizen has the right *.* aspire
to the highest position in his or her
chosen walk in life.
a cen-
tur.v received a tremendous 'mpetus, i
so that any good farm land w^ich can
i
property.
Steams' Kleo'ric Paste forces these pests to
fivm the building for wa^erand fresh air.
HEADY FOR rsE-HKTTKR THAN TRAP!
Directions In 1ft langnairee tn «*ery bo«.
Two Sites, S6c and I1M Bnovgh U kill fiOto MD IMS,
U. 8. Government boys It.
PARKER'S"
HAIR BALSAM
Dan
aruffMopr Hair FfeUlai
Rwtowi Color tad
BMatyloCnyurfFaMIUi
•uc. and fi.Mat n»uin»U.
fThwm Chcm. W Mcto«9eJ*-
HINDERCORN8 omon.
loDsea. etc., stop* all pain. Mavnw coarfort (he
feet, makes walklMr *•*•. U*. by stall or Ps
(lata Hlseox Cham!—I Works, fatefcogoo. l.
Kill All Flies!
THET 8PRBAD
DISRASB
Placed anywhere, DAISY FLY KILLBR attracts six)
kills all flies. Neat, clean, ornamental, convenient and
etwap. Lastaallsea
sot. Made of metal,
ean't spill or
tip over
will
not soil ortafur*
nythinj. GwmtMi
DAISY
FLY KILLER
at yoar dealer or
.prepaid. 11.2(5.
Kalb Aw.. Broaklya. N. Y.
LiverTrouble?
For relief BO to
For rates, etc., write
Mudbaden Sulphur Springs Co., Jordan, Mkm.
KREMOLA
A WONDERFUL FACE wLEACH.
T» l.iver Sim.m, *»o. fenlt r, o|
IT
iM .n. V.-«
*»«•«.
Or. O
U. KF.RKY
Co&li'ANt, Av«„ Chicago.
The Stage Today.
Alfred Noyes. who is conducting a
strong campaign for the purification
of the drama, said in a recent address:
"In Fifth avenue the other d«V I
saw a crowd assembled before a hair
dresser's shop 4vindow. The window
contained a wax presentation, life size,
of a young lady about to enter her
bath. As 1 turned disgustedly away
I heard a young man say:
'Why, this hairdresser has stolen
the plot of at least six of Broadway's
forthcoming pluys. lie Is bound lo be
sued right and left for plagiarism/m
LADIES CAN WEAR SHOES
One size smaller and wallt in comfort by
ustnif AI.KEN'S KoOT EASS, the antisep
tic powder for the Shaken into the
rhoes and sprinkled in the foot-bath. Allen's
Foot Knse mak»-s tirht or new shoes feel
easy: Riv*s inetant relief to corni*, bunions
and callouses, prevents Blisters. Callous
Sore Spots.-
The Wife's Day for the Car.
"How many," asked the chairman of
the meeting, "will pn.nnse to be on
hand next Thursday witto (Mr t«to*
mobiles?"
Not a band was ra'ised, and the sur
prised chairman said
"VVI at is the trouble? Surely some
of you own cars?**
"Yes,"
sjMke
up a boHl individual,
"most of \is own cars, but I reckon
everybody here is in the same boat
I am. Thursday is the day the wife
has the car and persoiiallv I know it's
no use asking for it at that time."—*
Detroit Free I'ross.
Misalliance.
"So you think Agnes married be
neath her?" "I do her husband plays
a srniMc of bridge."
Look for this Trade
Mark when you
buy Biscuits
F.Sioux
first
speaker.
"I say that I am more so," repeated
the other.
"What do you mean by that?"
"Why, you say yotl are Beck."
"Yes, I am. My name is Beck."
"Well, my name is Becker."
OR nearly 20 years
Biscuits (and Biff
lioui Cookie- Cakes and
Crackers) have been family
favorites. Baked in the mod—
«rn Manchester Bakarias
pure and wholesome mate*
mis used—and sold in sealed
packages. Ask yoar freest
for Big -^•*r**TT T'
§IG
Sioux
DISCUITS
Manchester Bbcuit Company
SiMB Falls* S. D. aad Fai** D.
BmtmbUmhad 1903
"i y
Purify Your Blood
get right after the blood thwilfr
S.3.S., the faauras old hob rem
edy, has helped enrich the Mood of
thousands, and relieved their iteb*
ing skin tortus during the lul
fifty years.
USED 50yEARs
&S.S
0R5MN1KCU
w dlf 'l*' iff*
Git S.&& from your
druggist today, and after
starting with it write u*
a htatory of rag ease.
adiiressinflrChtaf Medical
AdvisorT8S7 Swift Lab
oratory, Atlanta*
Oeoe-
v/
cVr-' ,*
V

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