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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, May 13, 1886, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1886-05-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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COUGHS, CROUP
AKD
CONSUMPTIONS
•'SWEET GUM***
MULLEIN.
iwHt fttm. gathered from a tree of the
Cm*principle
ntae, trowing along the small stream*
In tho
otbera State*, contains a stimulating expecto*
rant tfcat loosens the phlegm producing
ths early morolftg cough, and stlmolatos the child
lo throw off tbe false membrane la croup and
vfcooptafeoogh. when oombloed with the heal
tasf aaucnaxUKma principle In tbe mullein plant
•t tke oW fields, presents
KBOCT
LA TATLOK'S CIEBOKI*
or 8WBBT OUM AKP.
MULUUK
the fines*
teeir* remedy for Coughs, top, VThoopl&sr-ooagb
•—ij and so palatable, any &114
yoor drucglst for It. Prteo^
pleased
Sis, mart
JLTayWi Atlsata, Qa«
CowmnpUoa
sedtotaksIL .Ask:
•1. WsMeri
TUTrg
PELLS
28 YEARS IN USE.
t)M StMtat HodicalTrinmjli «f th*Agc!
SYMPTOMS OF A
TORPID LIVER.
Less of siHtlts» Bowele costive* Fein
tke head* with a dull s«nsa.tlon In th«
baefa part* Psii aider tho •fcenldey*
Uad« Fallneae sifter eating* with a 41a*
taeUnatlea to exartlen of body or mlod,
Irritability of teaapert Zioweptrtta* trlt&i
S fisltssof havlBf aoslectsd BOMOdStr,
Vv'e&riBoas, Dtzxlne^e, Fluttering at tho
flitrt. Dots before tho eyes# Hestd&ahe
9f«T ths right eye» Roitlsnnsu^ wftk
itXcl dr«ansi Highly colored VrliOi aad
CONSTIPATSON.
TOFT'S PUJL9 are especially ad&ptod
to mch cases* on doao offfrcta euofe a
-Aanfto of
feoM ng as to aatonlih the
sufferer.
Th&7 Sn&renae ths ipiMtUetUid cause th»
V5jr to Take oa Iflosfeutliu* tbe system la
*0turt8hed«&M bytbeir Tonic Aclioa os
XtA
DleQitlysOrmCif1teaiilKViStooUw»
grodocM. }*rtce fcfcc* 44 Jaurajvjr St.tlg»_*g»
8984
If
08U.Y Hun 07 Wn(BKari6 cbmgoil to
•Jiojsr Br.4C£ l:y £. tinjle *nplio*Uon of
eiu« DT». It imparts a n&tus*. ooloi,
tostftJiTwmecsiy. Hold by Drnsstot*,
OP
rant by oxprca* oa rccelpt of ijl.
f.flnr»avSt., Wow YofSt.
How he Bt:od.
I "stand," said an Eastern stump
orator, "on the broad platform of the
principles of '08, and pa'.sied be my
arm if I desert 'iim!'' "You stand on
nothinp of the kind," said a little ,choe
maker in tho crowd "you stand in my
boots, that you never paid me for, and
I want the money!"
BITTERS,
If you wish a certain enro for all Blood
diseases. Nothing was ever invented that will
cleanne the Blood and purif/ the System equal
to Hops and ItXAI/T Bitter*. It tones
up the 8yeteui) puts new Blood in your
veins, restores your lost appotlte and
sleep, and brings you perfect lieaUli, It
never rails to give relief in all cases of Kidney
or Liver Troubles. Blllonsnevs, Indi
gestion, Constipation, Sick Headaches, Xys»
pepsla. 'Nervous disorders, and all Female
Complaints when properly taken it a sure
cure. Thousands have b*»on benefited by it
in this and other Western StAtea. It in the best
Oomb'matlon of Vegetable remedies an yet
discovered for tbe restoration to health of the
Weiik and Debilitated# Do not get BIopi
and mALT Bitter* confounded with inte
rior preparations of similar name. I prescribe
Hops A Malt Bitters regularly in my practice.
Robert Turner, M. 0., Flat HOCK, Mich. For sale
py all druggists.
HOPS & HALT BITTERS CO, DETBQIT, HIGH
FREE!
THE BOSTON, St. Paul. Ifyot
g, will send them your name and ad
dress they will send you FREE at
illustrated catalogue and Rules fo
Self-Measurement. Address,
BOSTON
One Price Clothing House.
Cor. Third and Robert Sts.,
(•ST. FA.XJXj, MINN.
RTIFIL?
XT
MINNESOTA & NORTHWESTERN R. R,
Smooth Tracks,
Sleepers, BenuiL
Bates and
NO
Maklujr Envelope..
Third Assistant Postmaster-General
I Hnzen has completod the proposals for
bids for making stamped envelopes for
the next four years. May 1 every four
years these bids are advertised for,and
tho competition is more active and
I hair-splitting than for any other gov
ernment contract, as it is tho largest
ton Envelope Company of Hartford,
Conn., and the Morgan Envelope Com
pany of Springlield, Mass., liavo had
the making of stamped envelopes.
Since the Government began in 1851 to
sell stamped envelopes thero lias been
a steady increase in the amount requir
ed each year, until the Government has
for soveral years been selling more en
I velopes than all other producers com
I bined. Last year 270,000,500 stamped
envelopes, worth $5,773,000, were sold.
the extra letter sizo that then cost $6
are now sold for $2.40.
Tho proposals this year prorido a
I greater variety of paper and a number
of now grades. It was found that peo
ple preferred to buy the best quality of
envolopes rather than the medium sorts
while no cheap grade was provided.
This time a plain ungummed manila
I envelope has been called for which can
be sold for 40 cents a thousand. This
will meet the demand of circular adver
tisers, which is a largo one, monopo
lized hitherto by private dealers. Two
sizes callcd baronial, about 3x4 inches,
have been inserted for the benefit of tho
ladies who like to uso fancy note
papers. The size most used is tho plain
whito or amber known as No. 5, 8}x6
5-1G inches. Of this, for tho year end
ing March 31, 130,475,000 were re
quired, more than twice as many as
any other kind used.
Bidders are required to givo a bond
for $200,000 that they will go on with
tho contract if it is awarded to them
The contractor is required to do the
work under supervision of a govern
ment agent. The composition of tho
paper must bo according to Govern
ment formula. Rags must bo kept iu
the heater engines not less than sixteen
hours, and jute not loss than ten. Tho
water-mark, which has been a largo
monogram "U. S. P. O. D.," will be
changed to a small plain "U. S." The
cost for tho supply of stamped envel
opes is reduced by this year's proposals
20 per cent. In 1882 tho reduction was
7 per cent, and in 1878 20 per cent.
I have been celling your Athlophoros for
a few months and have sold between one
and two dozen. It gives better satisfac
tion for rheumatism than any other pre-
£[.
arntion of tbe kind I have ever sold. C.
Treat, druggist, Adrian, Mich.
A battered ton-cent piece is being handed
I round as an embodiment of hard dimes.
A Wonrterrul X^reak or Jfaturo
is sometimes exhibited in our public exhi
bitions. Wben we gaze upou some of the
peculiar freaks dame nature occasionally
indulges iu, our minds revert back to the
creation of man, "wh is so fearfully and
wonderfully made." The mysteries of his
nature have been unraveled by Dr. It. V.
Pierce, of Buffalo, and through his knowl
edge of those mysteries he has been able to
prepare his ''Golden Medical Discovery,"
which is a specific for all blood taints,
poisons and humors, such as scrofula, pim
ples, blotches, eruptions^ Rweliings, tu
mors, ulcers and kindred affections. By
druggists.
A Pennsylvanian has patented a milking
machine. Tbe best milking machine is a
calf. Inventors should turn their attention
to a patent for getting the milk out of the
calf.
Remember I Ayer's Ague Cure Is war
ranted to cure fever and ague. It never
ails.
"I must have order in this court-room,"
I sternly demanded a justice of the peace.
"I must and will have IOSB noise and con
fusion hero. I have already disposed of
three important cases without being able
to hear oue word of tho evidence."
During the war, Dr. Loyd, of Ohio, from
exposure contracted consumption. He eavs:
"I hare no hesitation in saying that it was
by the use of Allen's Luug Balsam that I
am now alive and enjoying perfect health."
Don't experiment with new and untried
medicines. If you have a cough or cold,
take atones Allen's Lung Balsam.
A Now York paper saya that "ice prom
ises to be reasonable." That is all right,
as far as it goes but it iB tho ice dealers
we want to Bee reasonable.— Troy Times.
Break-pin Plow Clevis and 8Horse Equal
izer combined saves Plow, Harness,Horses,
Time,Honey. Ask your dealer,
ed,Davis Hook and CI
WORMS
The largest Retai
Clothing, Hat au^
Furnishing Houw
in the West i.*
RFL'Q CHISEL TOOTH
XLLM UU SAW8 GIVE UN-
EQUALED SATISFACTION IN ALL
PARTS OF THE COUNTRY. STRONG
AND SIMPLE, CHEAPLY KEPT IN OR
DER. THEY MAKE BETTER LUMBER
WITH LESS POWER THAN ANY OTHER.
ADDRESS R. HOE & CO., BW GRAND
ST.,N. Y. CITY.
Elegant Coaches, Buffet
mil Scenery, Low
CHANGE OF CAES BETWEEN
St. Paul, Minneapolis
and
CHICAGO, ST. LOUIS & KANSAS CITY.
RAYMOND DuPtrr, Gen'l Superintendent.
H. M. btTTRix, Gen'l fiu#. Agent.
NEBRASKA
O
Spleudld Chanccs for Investment.
For Illustrated Pam
phlet describing the
country and its nd«
vantages for all kinds
of farming purposes,
and how to reach there. Address
FREE
E
A
T. W. TEASDAX.E,
LOANS
ARE THE
Geu'l
Passenger Agt., ST. PAUL, MINN.
on Life. Insurance rollcJe*—'•No Uutoal
Atd« l».P.V&n Konnan. box 75, Minneapolis.Minn
MJEHTS
and Sollolton cap big xaeney work
ing among tanner* thrtwgboat tbe north
HO CAPLUL required.
AddRAW
Paul.
C. J. OTUIOB,
'19
Agts. want-
evis Co. Madison,Wis.
Paper rails are made in Russia, we hear.
That iB nothing astonishing. Whole rail
ways are made out of paper iu this coun
try.—Philadelphia Call.
SCOURGE
OP
NIA VIXEOAB
CHILDHOOD.
Thousands of children die or grow up weak
and sickly, with disordered nerves and
stunted minds, the food necessary to their
growth having been eaten up bv these dis
gusting parasites.
DH. WALKER
S
CALIFOR­
BITTERS
not only expels
worms, but frees the stomach from the un
healthy secretions in which they breed.
You have plenty of reading here," said
a visitor to the literary editor, pointing to
a pile of books on the editorial desk.
"Theso are not for reading," replied the
editor, "they are for reviewing."
To Detect Counterfeits
Every bottle of the genuine Allen's Iron
Tonic Bitters bears
the following signa
ture. They aro put
up in round, black or
ruby bottles, holding
IU pints, and are made by J. P. Alien, Bt.
Paul, Minn. All others are base imlta
tions. Look to the signature closely and
be not deceived.
"What metal is this c^ueer little paper
weightl" she asked.
I said the artist. "And
ished crayon sketch!"
out.
that's block tin,"
what is this unfin
"O, that's blocked
A luxuriant head of hair adds to beauty
and comeliness. Use Hall's HairRenewer.
A gushing correspondent sftys of a lic
orory celebrity that "his conversation is
full of light." Poor fellow! he must be
lantern-Jawed.
BROWN'S
IRON fe
BITTERS
WILL CURE
HEADACHE
INDIGESTION
BILIOUSNESS
DYSPEPSIA
NERVOUS PROSTRATION
MALARIA
CHILLS AND FEVERS
TIRED FEELING
GENERAL DEBILITY
PAIN IN THE BACK & SIDES
IMPURE BLOOD ssfw'se®7'
CONSTIPATION
FEMALE INFIRMITIES
RHEUMATISM
NEURALGIA
KIDNEY AND LIVER
TROUBLES
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS
The Genuine has Trade Ma*it and crossed Bed
lists en wrapper*
"ARB NO OTHER.
,c-\
.'J*
THE TENDER HEART.
She gazed upon the burnished brae«
Ot plump-ruffed grouse he showed
pride
Angelic grief was in her face
"Sow could ycu do it, dearl" she sighed.
"The poor, pathetic, moveless wings!
with
The songs all bushed O, cruel shame!"
Said he, "The partridge never sing*."
Said she, "The
sin is quite the same.1'
single contract which tho department I Some string of birds1 white and blue,
[makes. For twelve years the Plimp- „.Or butterflies upon a pin.
years the Plimp
"You men are savage through and th/ough.
ipt
Tho angle-worm in anguish dies,
Impaled, the pretty trout to tease
"Mv own, we fish for trout with flies."
"Don't wander from the question,
please 1"
She quoted Burns' "Wounded Hare,''
And certain burnlug lines of Blake's,
And Ruskin on the fowls of air.
And Coleridge on the water-snakes.
At Emerson's "Forbearauce" he
Began to feel his will benumbed
At Browning's "Donald" utterly -i
With everj' letting tho size of tho con
tract increases and tho prico of enve
lopes is reduced. Envelopes which in
18G9 cost $4.80 per thousand can now I (He subsequently ascertained),
hn snlfl fnr «:«n rvnr thnnainri nnrl To trim tier bat with humming-birds,
po sola lorjSx.au per thousand, and —Helen Gray Cone,
His soul surrendered and succombed.
"O, gentlest of all gentle girls,*'
He thought, "beneath the blessed sun!"
He saw her lashes hung with pearls
And swore to give awav his gun.
She smiled to finii her point was gained,
And wont, with happy parting words
in the Cent
Century.
TOO RURAL.
Ernest Bond had met Lemuel Dark
field, a handsome and accomplished
Now Yorker, in sunny Italy. Beneath
the genial skies of that gentlo clime a
friendship had grown up betwoen the
two young men.
Ernest Bond was also an Amorican,
with all the cheory mannors and agree
able speech of that people. When ho
finished his courso at collegc, his
health was so shattered that the doc
tors advised a trip to Europe. As his
parents wero merely well-to-do far
mers, they could not meet tho expen
ses of such a journey. But a rich
uncle, an eastern banker, with more
heart than tho generality of the species
warrant, came nobly to tho rescue, and
ofl'ered to defray his nephew's expen-
Krnest accepted Ills uncle's favors
on condition that he should bo allowed
to do some work in the bank when his
health permitted. The kind uncle
agreed to that way of balancing ac
counts. So Ernost crossed tho Atlan
tic, visited many parts of Europe, and
after a year's stay, had regained his
usunl vigor and was coming homo.
When Ernest mado tho announce
ment that ho was soon to start for
America, Lemuel Darklield, being
gentleman of wealth and leisure, ex
pressed a desire to return with him
and see Locust Glade, as tno Bond
Farm was called, ho being quite unac
customed to country life.
An invitation to do so was soon ten
dered by Ernest, and tho young men
returned together. Thoy were seated
iu a hack, which was conveying them
to Locust Glade, whea Mr. Darklield
suddenly remarked:—
"What shocking tasto some of our
country ladies have! See that youn
lady driving without gloves." And he
pointed with his bamboo cane to a girl
who had just passed then), driving
barehanded a span of fine horses.
Ernest did not notico the criticism
which Mr. Darklield had applied to
country women. He was engaged
looking over his shoulder, not at the
fair driver who handled tho reins
faultlessly, not nt the glossy-topped
carriage, but at tho lino horses trotting
along tho highroad so proudly.
"By Jove." ho ejaculated, "I'd al
most be rash enough to bet a snug
thousand that those are my father'
horses. But who can that girl be
who was driving them? Mother did
not mention any young ladies visiting
her, and it wasn't Janet, the hired
girl."
"Perhaps somo female horse-thief
has been taking an inventory of your
father's tine stock, and concluded to
relievo him of tho caro of so many
said Darklield, smilingly.
Ernest laughed, aud saying all would
be explained when they reached his
home, tho subject was dropped.
Locust Glade was a fine old place,
situated about a mile and a quarter
from a thrifty little tow*. Just now
in the golden glory of a mild breezy
September afternoon it was delightful.
At least tho travel-stained gentlemen
both thought so. as they wero being
driven up a wide lane, thickly fringed
on each side with locust trees, the
feathery foliage of which cast one con
tinuous, delicious shade all the way to
the commodious farmhouse, its pale
lead-color just faintly discernible
through the denso thickct of the
locusts.
After Mrs. Bond, a kind, motherly
woman of forty odd years, had greeted
her son affectionately, with a thanks
giving silently wafted to heaven for
that sons return to perfcct health, she
turned to the tall, bearded stranger,
who stood in tho background, coolly
noting everything that characterize!!
Locust Glade.
After the greetings wero over Mrs.
Bond showed tho young men their
rooms, whero fresh wator and cloan
linen «oon restored them to their usual
good spirits.
When they were seated in tho cool
and neat parlor of tho farmhouse, Mrs.
Bond said to her son,—
"Your father is down in tho meadow
mowing. -Ho did not expect you to
day, aind ho was anxious to finish cut
ting, tho rain delayed him so much in
getting up the hay. Ho intended try
ing to meot you at tho station," she ex
plained addressing both tho young
men.
Darkfield thought that his friend's
mother was a very commonplaco wo
man. What poor taste in her to bore
them with farm subjects.
"Country customs, I presume," ho
told his spirit of criticism.
Had ho reasoned, ho might have seen
at once that kind Mrs. Bond wished to
apologize because no ono had gone to
meet them at the station. But ho sum
moned up enough politeness to reply:
•'Do not apologize, Mrs. Bond. Had
1 you sent tho carriage for ns, we should
havo missed giving you the pleasure of
a surprise."
"By-the-by, mother," said Ernest, "I
I was suro fathers carriage and horses
passed us as we were coming from tho
I station, driven by a young lady
"So you recognized the toamP" said
his mother, with a laugh.
'Yes, but who was the fair driver?"
asked tho son.
"The gloveless nymph," said the
critical Darkfield to himself.
"Oh, that was Grace," smilingly an
swered Mrs. Bond.
"And who is Grace?" asked Ernost.
'•Gloveless Grace! A country god
dess!" thought tho young city inan.
•Graco Lovejoy," answered Mrs.
I Bond. "She is principal teachcr of the
village school, and a dear good girl
she is. She insisted on boarding here,
where she has free, access to fresh milk
and vegetables. This afternoon sho
latched up the team herself, and drove
over to town for a new supply of
groceries for me."
"Decidedly masculine!" thought Mr.
|D*rkfeld.
"GlovelflM Graea" ,t that moment
":t: W'F.
fly
drove up, sprang out, and oommenced I worthy in every respect, that he soon
unhitching tbe horses. Grace Lovi-joy became cashier'of the bank.at salary
had been brought upon a farm, where that justified hii marryiug. He then
she had acquired the aft of handling wooed and won the girl whose energy
horses, and she had a great passion for and character had first attracted his
the dumb creatures who always show
ed such ready obedience to tUo tones
of lier firm but kind voice.
Mrs. Bond came out for her grocer
ies, followed by thelyonng men. Grace
Lovejoy, a girl of about twenty, with
soulful, intelligent dark eyes, a wild
rose complexion, and a perfect form,
though plum]) as a quail, bowed grace
fully as Mrs. Bond presented the men.
Ernest requested tho privilege of
taking the horses to the stable, while
Darkfield escorted her to tho house.
Almost any other young lady would
have accepted the offer. Hut Grace
Lovejoy did not. She thanked him iu
way that mado his heart leit faster,
and a red glow mount to his cheeks,
but assured him that he had been ab
sent so long that he would be sure to
get them in tho wrong stalls and hang
the harness on tho wrong pegs, and
thus occasion Farmer Bond much an
noyance when he came in from the
field.
So the young men wero obliged to
see "GlovclessGracio's little fat brown
hands lead of the team" to tho stable.
"Perfectly lovely in form and feature,
but such shocking taste!" said Mr.
Darkfield within himself.
Shortly after, Grace joined them in
tho parlor. She was thoroughly at
ease, and convorsed with perfect grace.
'You aro not afraid of animals, it
appears, Miss Lovejoy?" said Dark
lield.
'Afraid?" and she laughed at the
idea. "Why, the dear creatures are
more human than many people."
'How did you learn so much about
dumb animals, if you will pardon the
inquiry? You aro certainly not coun
try bred," pursued the city man.
'Oh, yes, I am, aud I am proud to
own it. 1 learned all about horses and
how to manage tiium on my father's
farm. Tho pleasure of my stay at Lo
cust Glade is enhanced by the privilege
afforded mo of being able to go among
tho stock to uiy heart's content." an
swered Gracg Lovejoy, smilingly
'•What perverted tastes this country
girl must possess, aud she so lovely,
too,"' thought Mr. Darkfield.
A few evenings after that, the digui
lied city man was quite shocked when
Miss Lovejoy, equipped with milking
ail, started started for the cow lot to
lelp with the milking.
Mrs. Bond had told her she should
not perform such work. For reply
Graco had given a merry laugh, anil
snatching oue of the pails, she hurried
out after Janet.
Sho gave the young men one of her
pleasant smiles as she passed them in
the grape arbor where they wore re
galing themselves with some of the de
licious purple fruit. Sho paused a mo
ment to admire some delicate primroses
that grew by tho path. Sho was out of
sight, but not out of hearing.
"Well, if that isn't too genuinely
country bred for my use," she^lieard
Darklield say.
"What lias provoked your criticism,
my friend?" askod young Boud.
Ernost Bond was used to Darklield's
constant fault-finding with everything,
and when he transferred tho force of
that habit to the customs of country
people, he bore with it iu perfcct good
humor.
"I cannot understand how a lady of
Miss Lovejoy's manners and education
can stoop to do a servant's work. The
idea of a lady who performs on the
piano and entertains polished company,
going out to tho stock-yard aud doing
work that will surely result in harden
ing and darkening the hands, is very
revolting," said Darklield.
"I suppose it is just ono of Aliss
Lovejoy impulses of kindness to help
Janet with tho milking," replied
Earnest.
"Impulses of nonsense!" exclaimed
his friend. "Who would want a|
woman actuated by such impulses?
She is too rural."
Whether Grace Lovejoy was too ru-1
rural or not, Darklield seemed to have
forgotten what he had said to that ef
fect as tho weeks sped on and found
him still a very willing recipient of the
hospitalities of Locust Glade.
Ho had criticised her at first, called
her a gloveless nymph, and masculine,
because she could hitch and unhitch
horses and milk cows but as days
srave placc to weeks, and ho was
thrown more in her company, like
Earnest Bond ho fell nnder the sweet
spoil of her most loveable disposition,
lie would supply her with autumn
leaves from the neighboring woods,
ferns and bright berries from tho hills,
and curious pebbles from the brook
that stole so musically through tho
broad meadow of Locust Glado farm.
While arktield offered Miss Love
joy every attentijn, young Bond wor
shipped this fair girl, who seemed to
hold a superior talent for managing bi
peds aud quadrupeds, But his wor
ship was secret nor did Grace dream of
his attachment.
One day Darkfield was walking home
from the school with Miss Lovejoy,
carrying her books and tho straw
basket in which she carried her
luncheon. He had been telling her
of his beautiful city home, and saying
that all it needed to givo it an air of
completeness was a refined little
womau.
Graco instinctively knew what was
coming and sho said not a word.
But when Darklield began pleadinar
for her love aud asking iier to marry
him, sho recovered her speech.
"No, Mr. Darkfield, I can never
love you. Beside, 1 am too country
bred "to marry a city man."
Tho last sentcnco she uttered with a
tinge of sarcasm in her voice which he
was quick to dotect, and to remember
tho cause.
"Do not spurn mo for a thoughtless
criticism," he implored.
"I do not. You unknowingly ut
tered a truth—I am too rural."
"Oh, Graco, forgive me!"
"I do forgive you, Mr. Darkfield,
hoping you have learned that a coun
try girl cannot entertain company and
teach only, but she can also manage
horses and milk cows when necessary
Say no more about it, please, and do
not refer to this matter again. It will
bo wasting time," was tho practical
adviee Grace gave him.
Thoy walked in silence down tho lo
cust-fringed lane. At the farmhouse
door ho handed Grage her books and
luncheon basket, then turned on bis
heel and left her without a singlo word.
Tho prospect of securing a wealthy
husband and a beautiful city home
would havo been too glitteriug a bait
for somo girls to resist. But Graco
Lovejoy was truo to her own heart.
She preferred to plod on in the old
routine, until her kindred soul appear
ed, rather than marry for tho merce
nary purpose of obtaining a tine house
without the ono ossontial gem, love, to
guild it.
Darkfield left tho next day, notwith
standing tho Bonds urged him cordial
ly to remain longer. Ho said to him
self that he had had quite enough of
the country for ono time. But he
pleaded business affairs at home, and
so departed.
Poor fellow! Grace Lovejoy's refus
al bad given his vanity a stab that
would heal only with time's potent
balm.
Ernest Bond did not declare his love
for tho brown-eyed Graco at onco. Ho
wont East and fulfilled tho agreement
he had mads with hi» unele.
He did so well, showing ^himself so
esteem on his return to Locust Glade.
Of course Grace was "too genuinely
country-bred" to refuse to bccoixie the
wife of a farmer's son.
Fresh Fatihlon Notes-
White dresses are to be tho rage in
Paris direct'y tho hot weather'sets in.
Cloaks for small girls are to be haif
litting and extend to the bottom of the
dress skirt
A four-leaved shamrock in a tiny
crystal medallion is the last ornament
worn on bangles. ,,
Pocket handkerchiefs are now made
with very narrow hems, edged with a
border of Valenciennes lace.
While there aro many fancy styles in
the new exhibits of hosiery, solid col
ors aud dark shades seem to be the
favorites. Tho popularity of black
lioso increases ratlier than diminishes,
and they will bo worn with light dress
es of all sorts and with the most dressy
toilets in evening shades.
Walking costumes of summer serge
or cheviot are mado with a pleated
skirt a second skirt, much shorter,
pleated across tho front forming
schawl-point at tho side and a puff on
the back. The bodice comes down in
to a peak both in front and at tho back:
it is trimmed with a collar and ruffle of
wollen lace to match.
Girls' hats and bonnets for spring
are mostly of dark straw, and the ma
jority of them are faced with
velvet or other dark material and
tnrn very far back from tho face,
tho brims in many styles reaehing
to tho top of the high crowns, wliorc
they arc fastened by a strong stitch or
are held in witii the trimming. A few
made feathers aro used, but more os
rieh tips are seen than usual.
Theater bodices are now being in
troduced for the purpose of wearing
out skirts that have ceased to belong
to la premiere fvaicheur. These waists
are made of embroidered tulle, beaded
with pampilles, over bright colors
such as jonquil, scarlet, white, pale
pink or bine. Tho sleeves aro
to the elbow and are trim
med with falling strings of iridescent
jets the high collar band is equally of
tho same multicolored trimming aud
epaulets of tho same beading
correspond with the vest. In
the tapole worn with these
little vests tho bouquet of llowers or
high-standing, tsghtly-tied bow of
ruban must be of the some color as the
fond of the bodice.
Hound hats aro very high in the
crown, and have the brim wider on
one side than the other and slightly
rolled upward. Sor^j have little. If
any brim at the back of the head, it
being cut up to tho edgo of the crown
so there is no projection whatever at
tho back. It is more fashionable to
trim this stylo of hat at the back than
at the front. Long plumes arc so set
as to fall over the back of the head and
relieve tho "cut-oil"' appearance of
which many ladies havo complained.
Other shapes aro trimmed at one side
with loopes of ribbou or a bunch of
llowers, or short or half-long ostrich
plumes. Many hat frames are covered
with lace or crape and thickly set with
beads. A few large round hats have
jersey-cloth covers under a net-work
of beads or of knotted cord or braid.
Why Men Smoke.
A writer in the St. James Gazette
thinks that a number of literary men
smoke simply to make an income.
They havo learned that with a pipe in
their mouths thoughts not only come
more readily, but in better order: and
that, while it is often difficult to get
the proper word if thoy are not smok
ing, it runs to the point of tho pen the
moment they "light up." Psychologi
cally this is the most interesting and
the reason womankind cannot grasp it
probably is that psychology is not, un
fortunately, taught in ladies' semin
aries. Smoking is a groat safeguard
against infectious diseases. It is only
by reading up tho subject scientifically
in medical treatises that one thorough
ly gets to understand the thousand
risks of this kind that wo run every
day. In tho country during tho sum
mer months, when men ate 011 their
holidays, they look forward to having
at temporary respite from smoking.
Then it does not so much matter how the
temperament is liviug so much iu the
open air, the smoking of other persons
has littlo effect on them, aud there is
less danger of infection. It is to keep off
the flies ihat men smoke on the seaside
and on the hills. Their own weather
beaten countenances can stand th
Hies but theso little demons would not
only spoil tho summer for our suscept
ible wifes and sisters and children, but
would disliguro them as well.
That is what a man cannot endure.
You may havo seen picnics on the river
or among the fields, with all tho men
smoking and the ladies standing quite
near thorn. AVith many men smoking
is merely an excuse for staying at
homo. A man looks foolisli of an
evening doing nothing yet he is too
tired to do much. A cigar supplies the
amount of labor he requires, and he
does not mind the trouble of smokiuc
it so long as it enables him to stay at
home without loss of diguity and look
admiringly, and yet undemonstrative
ly, at his wife. Should a man with
small income bo an epicure, or natural
ly of an irascible temper, it will add
greatly to the happiness of his homo
he compels himself to smoke. Aud at
present, whou times are so hard as to
affect every one more or less, a cigar
is a cheap and excellent substitute for
expensive amusements.
A Metropolitan Opera Box.
New York Town Topics: If any of
my lady readers has inlluonco enough
with the authorities of tho Metropoli
tan Opera-House to obtain permission
to poop into Mr. Rockefeller's box on
the grand tier let her uso it at once,
The ante-room to the box is litted up
in tho most luxurious style crimsou
satin, plisso and tufl'od, covers the walls
and ceiling, a velvet carpet doadeu tho
footsteps, and a magnificent lounge
with pillows, etc., iuvitos to repose—
especially when "Parsifal" or portions
of "Die Meistersinger" are on. Iu
corner is a pretty cabinet, the contents
of which can only bo guessed at, Tho.ro'
is a door separating the ante-room
from tho box, instead of a portiere
and tho littlo window is provided with
a satin-covered shutter. A couple that
desired to shun Wagnerian uoiso and
the observation of thoir neighbors
could ask for no more sccludcd, richer,
or more comfortable retreat.
Credit is due the German women
and physicians for first using Red
Clover blossoms as a medicine. Best
results are obtained when combined
with other medicinal roots and herbs
as in Dr. Jones' Red Clover Tonie,
which is tho best known remedy for
all blood diseases, stomach and liver
troubles, pimples, costiveness, bad
breath, piles, ague and malaria
diseases, indigestion, loss of appotlte
low- spirits, headache and all diseases
of the kidneys. Price 50 cents,
by Druggists.
A 0 year-old Pittsburg child, being asked
"What is a rope!" replied, "A fat stri ng,"
Uencfa and liar*
Chambers' Journal: The writer re
members of a gentleman who, not
wishing to pay the legal and recog
nized fee for a consultation with his
lawyer devised an expedient whereby
he expected to gain the information he
required without the usunl cost. He
accordingly invited the man "Learned
in law" to dino at his house on a par
ticular evening as a friend and old ac
quaintance. The lawyer gladly ac
cepted the invitation, and attended at
the house of bis friend 'and client
promptly to tho minute. Tho conver
sation for some time was general aud
agreeable, and tho shrewd client, by
hinting and suggesting, at last drew
the lawyer out into a learned aud ex
plicit dissertation upon the subject
the host wished to be informed upon.
The clicnt, pleased, satisfied, and
smiling, chuckled thinking how nicely
he had wormed out the advice de
sired and pumped his lawyer free of
cost.
Tho feast over, tho lawyer departed,
jqually pleased, and, both being satis
fied, all went merry as a marriage-bell,
But a few days afterward tho client re
ceived a letter from his lawyer inform
ing him that the charge for profession
al advice and consultation was 18s. -Id.,
and would he "kindly attend to the
payment of the sums at his earliest con
venience and oblige?" The client
was wild—caught in his own trap but
being determined to outwit tho lawyer
and gain his own ends. I10 forwarded
to the latter a bill for "dinner, wines,
and accessories supplied," on the lGth
inst., amounting to thirteen shillings
and four pence, saying that if he would
settle the iucloscd bill he should only
be too pleased and happy to settle the
lawyer's littlo bill. Tho lawyer re
torted by threatening to commence an
action against mine host for selling
wines without a license unless his (tho
lawyer's) bill was immediately paid.
Do I neeb to say that the lawyer was
victorous?.
When I was a boy I heard of a law
yer who was called up in tho middle of
a cold winter's night to draw up the
will of an old farmer who lived some
three miles away, and who was dying.
The messenger had brought a cart to
convey the lawyer to the farm, aud the
latter in due time arrived at his desti
nation. When he entered tho house
I10 was immediately ushered into tho
sick room, and he then requested to be
supplied with pen, ink, and paper.
There wero none in the house. The
laywer had not brought any himself,
and what was lie to do? Any lead pen
cil? ho inquired. No they had none.
Tho farmer was failiug, though quite
conscious. At last the legal gentleman
saw chalked up on the back of the bed
room door eo'iimu upou column of
figures iu chalk. These were milk
"scores" or "shots." lie immediately
asked for a piece of chalk, and then,
kneeling on the lloor, he wrote out
concisely upon the smooth hearth-stone
the last will and testamont of tho dy
ing man. The farmer subsequently
died. Tho hearth-stono will was sent
to the principal registry in London,
with special affidavit, and was duly
provcu, the will being deposited in
the archives of the registry. 1 may
mention that tho lav/ does not state
upon what substance or with what in
strument a will must bo written.
There was once a plain, outspoken
Judge, who, addressing the jury, said:
Gentlemen of tho jury, in this case
tho counsel on both sides are unintel
ligible, tho witnesses on both sides are
incredible, and the plaintiff and defend
ant aro both such bad characters that
to 111c it is indifferent which way you
give your verdict."
It was once reported to the notorious
Judge Jetliies that the Prince of Or
ange was 011 the point of enteriug into
the country, and that ho was already
preparing^ manifesto as to his induce
ments and objects in so doing. "Pray,
my Lord Chief-Justice," said a gentle
tleman present, "what do you think
ill be tbe heads of this manifesto?"
Mine will be one," he grimly replied.
Au undoubted alibi was somo time
go successfully proved in an Ameri
an court, as follows:
And you say you aro innocent of
the charge of stealing this rooster from
Mr. Jones?" queried the Judge.
Yes, sir 1 am innocent—as inno
cent as a child."
You are confident you did not steal
tho rooster fom Mr. Jones?"
Yes, sir aud I can prove it."
IIow can you prove it?
I can prove that I didn't steal Mr.
Jones' rooster, Judge, because I stole
two hens from Mr. Graston the sau-e
night and Jones lives live miles from
Graston's."
The proof is conclusive," said the
judge "discharge tho prisoner."
Gentlemen of tho jury," said au
Irish barrister, "it will be for you to
say whether this defendant shall be
allowed to come into court with un
blushing footsteps, with tho cloak oj
hypocrisy in his mouth, aud draw three
bullocks out of my clicut's pockct with
impunity."
Wo have heard of several cases of
femalo ingenuity in aiding the escape
of prisoners. Hero is oue: The crim
inals were handcuffed, and with their
escort was awaiting tho train which
would convey them to the county jail.
Suddenly a woman rushed through the
crowd of spectators with a shower of
teais and cried out: "Kiss megood-by,
Ned!" Tho escort good-naturedly al
lowed the process 01 osculation to be
performed, aud the sheriff' smiled feel
ngly. The woman passed a key from
her own to tho. prisoner's mouth, with
which ho undid the "bracelets'' and
escaped while the train was in motion
SSOO Not Called For.
It peems atruugo tliat it is necessary to
persuade men that you can cure their dis
eases by offering a premium to the man
who (ails to receive benefit. An4 yet Dr.
Sage undoubtedly cured thousands of cases
of obstinate catarrh with hiB "Catarrh
Remedy," who would never have applied
to him, it it had not been for his offer of
the above sum for an incurable oase.
Who is tho next bidder for cure or cashl
.loltuny on Arbitration,
"Johnny," said Mr. McSwilligen to
his youthful son and heir last night, "1
am sorry to hoar from your mother
that you have been a very bad boy.'
Johnny hung his head and his father
continued: "You got into light with
Jimmy Jones, aud ho tore your coat
and blacked your eye." "Well I guess
I nearly broke his nose. So ho didn't
have ail the fun." protested Johnny.
"1 must punisli you for such conduct,"
continued Mr. McSwilligen, as ho took
a long strap down from the nail. "But.
father," said Johnny, "before you
strike let's see if we can't arbitrate this
difficulty." Johnny was let off that
time.—Pitlsburq Chronicle Telegraph.
Those who believe that nature will
work off a cough or cold should under
stand that this ts done at the expense
of the constitution. Each time this
weakens tbe system, and we all know
that the termination of this dangerous
Eon't
ractico is a consumptive's grave.
take tho chances, when a fifty
cent bottlo of Dr. Big-alow's Positive
Cure will safely and promptly cure any
recent congh, cold or tin oat or lung
trouble. Buy the dollar bottle. Sola
by Druggists, for chronic cases or for
family use.
Soft and TOhlt« hands*
Good Housekeeping: A woman whoso
pretty hands are being ruined by wosh
ing in hard water writes to ask a rem
edy. Water can bo easily softeued
with a few drops of anionic, .or what
is bettei a small piece of lump borax.
Warm water into which enough borax
had been dissolved to make tho water
feel a little slippery when pressed be
tween the thumb and fiDger is very
good for washing tho hands. Hands
kept dirty are never smooth and whito.
Absolute cleanliness is necessary.
Many people who do not work wash
their hands but seldom. The days
accumulation of dirt is allowed to re
main on the hands at night. Upon
rising tins hands are washed in cold
water. Tho possessor wonders whv,
when sho does no work, her hands do
not look any better, if as well as her
chambermaid's. Tho hands should
always be washed in warm soapsuds
before going to bed. White soaps are
safest. Highly scented and colored
soaps are almost invariably made from
rancid and ill-smelling fats. After the
hands aro tborougly fried uso a few
drops of mixed glycerino and camphor,
which the druggist can proparo for
you. Drop into the palm of the hand
and rub 011 tho hands. This will be
all that*will be necessary to show do
cided improvement.
When old Judge Jowler was tucked in
his little bed by Mrs. Mouser he couldn't
sleep a wink until the excellent woman
had brought a bottle of Dr. Bull's Cough
Kyi up. Then he crossed his little hands
and sank in sweet repose.
Clever ,lnps.
It is said that a Japanese mechanic
can measure distances with his oye.
Ho can reduce wood aud iron to
squares aud levels in that way. Ho
will cut a board or a stick a give'u
number of feet, using his eye for de
termiuing tho length and breath.
Every Japanese boy who is fairly well
educated draws with just as much
facility as he writes. Ho figures
everything which bo wants to illustrate.
Having occasion once to ask a Japan
ese studeut something about methods
of warfare iu that country(he had been
a soldier attached to ono of tho great
Damios), he immediately figured his
explanation in a neat drawing on
paper. Ho could not command enough
English words to make his meaning
clear, but he could made it clear by a
sketch with his pencil. Not ono
American boy in ten who has received
a fair common school education could
havo mado a free-hand drawing illus
trating tho use of war implements
impleiuenst of industry.—San
cisco Bulletin.
1886.
"The Greatest
or
Fran-
lleliotrope is a favorite color of shade
—in silk fabrics only, however, for in
wollen it looks dull and faded. Indian
silks are very cool ana pleasant to wear
iu summer, and are not very expen
sive.
THESTANDARD
SKOW^Flffi
L'NSP'J
S1,000 Reward I
If proven impuro. Every can wnrrnntednn
lform full Ktrencth—and free from nlnm.&c.
KndoraiKi by Dr. K. G. Ixve« N. Ym If0!*
Collier, TJ. S. chemist, Washington Prof. J.
A. DCKIKI*, Ftoto university, Minn. Dr. Alex.
J. Stone J)r. H. A. Boardmnn Dr. Dedolph:
Dr. Jones Prof. Weigbrecht, St. Paul* and
the medical world v/liercver it is tested.
C. U. GKOFl?, Mf&., St.
Sold only iu cons by ull Grocers.
IN MINNESOTA AND DAKOTA
•Cloie to IlaJJroiwl. Aito,
Vow price* icd on eusj terms.
C. F. KINDRED, Brstnerd, Minn.
unimproved landi at
Addreas
f!SH
Kono fftnalao nnl«M
I'latui'Hd with thA atov«
TRAPS MARK.
Snot
IIMive
CHANNING SEABURY, IS. B. FOOT,
President. First "Vice President.
H. P.RUG-G-, J. P. LAH.KIN,
HARDWARE.
Stroncr-IIftckett Hardware Co*
FarwttU, Ozinuu Si Jacktton.
Adam Decker.
IRON, STEEL AND HEAVY HARDWARE.
Nicols & Dean.
Rhodes & Morton*
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS.
Anerlmch, Flncli
St
Van Slyck.
LlndckeM, Warner St .Schurtnetar*
Powers Dry Good* Co.
NOTIONS AND FURNISHING GOODS.
Blabon, Warren
St
Clilpley.
Arthur, Warren St Abbott*
GROCERS.
P. 11. Kelly Mercautlle Co*
Allen, Moon
St
Co.
Bfaxtteld
St
Seabury*
lieaupre. KCORII
St
Co.
Yaus, Griggs & Howes.
TEAS, COFFEES AND SPICES.
Berkey, Tallmadge A Co.
1
BOOTS ANS SHOES.
O* Gotzlan Si Co.
Kellogg, Johnson A Co.
Foote, Scluflr.e St Co.
J. 11* Tarbox St Co.
HATS, CAPS AND FURS.
Gordon St Ferguson.
Lanpher, Finch
St
Skinner*
StreUsguth Si Drake.
DRU6S.
Hoyes Bros. A Cutler*
Byan Drug Co.
CHINA, CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE,
Craig, Larkln St Smith.
Donaldson A Ogden.
LEATHER, SHOE FINDINGS AND SADDLERY
HARDWARE.
P* R. IJ* Hardenbergh St Co*
Behefler St Kosnum.
PAPER AND STATIONERY.
Averill, Carpenter St Co.
Ward, Ulll St MoClelUn.
Pioneer Press Co.
-BOOKS, PAPER AND STATIONERY.
Bt. Paul Hook & Stationery Co.
CL0THIN6 AND FURNISHING GOODS.
H* C. llurbank.
MEN'S FURNISHING 600DS.
Gnlterman Rros.
TAILORS' TRIMMINGS AND WOOLENS.
Yallop, De Oroot Co.
RUBBER GOODS AND BELTING.
St. Paul Rubber Co*
Goodyear Rubber Co*
CIGARS AND TOBACCOS.
Whlteman Bros*
C* M. Mcl,atn.
NOTIONS AND COUNTER SUPPLIES.
V. Bonitner* it Co.
1
GOTO
For the core of Coughs, Colds, Hoarse*
ness, Croup, Asthma, Bronchitis,
Whooping Cough, Incipient Con
sumption, and for the relief of con
sumptive persons in advanced stages
of the Disease. For Sale by all Drug*
gists. Price, 25 cents.
Treasurer. I 8econd Vice President.
W. F. Phelps, Secretary C. A. McNeale, Assistant Secretary.
MEMBERS. 1886.
•N
on Efirth for Fein.** WlD
reUere nore
qnlcllr Hum ruiy other known rem-1
euy: HheumaUam, KcurataiaJ
Swelling 8UIZ tfeclc, ftruueeJ
Duma, Scalds, Call, Lamba
co. ITenrltr.
Bores, Froft-blte*,
Hacknube, Qairecr,
Soro Throat,
Hcl&Mca. Wound
a, Hcadacbe,
Toothacho, flnrolna, ctc». Price
HCU. IK bottle. SoWby ell
Hlnunrtfifev Caution.—The {pen
nine
Salvation Oil
bears our
rrgt«tcred TrrulMiark,
and onr
riMimiiB nnuwtire. A. C, liryer & Co.,
Proprietor*, jlaltimore, Ud.,
17.B.A.
DR. BULL'S COUGH SYRUP
MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES.
Robinson & Cary.
RugorN, WIUIx St Co.
Campbell, Walfth Si Jllson.
WOOD AND IRON PUMPS AND PLUMBERS'
SUPPLIES.
H* P. Rngg & Co.
SCALES, WINDMILLS, ETC.
Falrbankit, Morse St Co.
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS.
A. Oppeuhelmer St Co.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
Nathan Ford.
W. J. Dyer 8t llro.
FRUITS, NUTS, ETC.
B. Presley Si Co.
3
This Maunlflcent
Stool and Book
ONLY SC5.
tottd IHftck Walnut
CJIFO, four KCtB of
rcodfc nnd nlno
Flops Vuily war
r.iuu-d for
1M Write nt onco lor
mil particulars 10
tbe Largest Music llmi*- in JHH Xorthwost.
W..J, UVEIt & 1UU)., St. PnuUnd MlnncnpolU.
Hot aw.5WW
•r pAUt tit the Rheumatic Una
ATHLOPHOROS two JWI AGO.
•r_gala _th_e_Bheam»tlo Una bar* I had alnco mint
0 yri
euro la "uTj caw.'"~ Mrs. Villa Smith, 61 N. Potter Stmt,
It made thorough
SprlnpflcM, 0. Atfetapboro* ta abaoluwly aafo eootainloi
no opium, morphine or other lojurloua ingredient, aadlt a
•ureeurefor Kheumatlim. Ask rour druggUt for Athlo
phoroi, If
TOO
eannot get It of him do not try fomelhlnf
•IM, but oraff at onee from us, We will send It «xpre«J
paid en rtcrlpt of price, $1.00 per bottle.
ATHLOPHOROS CO.. 112 Wall St.. NawTork.
I W 4 2 2 A N or
JJIV 19 Minneapolis, Minn.
Chronic, Nervous and Special Dlneaseft 1
Consultation personally or by mail FKKK and In
vited. If preferred, patients need
PAY NO FEB UNTIL CUltED
Question Mat scut on application. Ills Book on Ner
vous and Spcciul Diseases— ftill description of sub*
Jcctii which every mnu and woman contemplating
marrlngo and regarding hcAlth. should know—sent
to any nddrens 011 receipt of 10c In potftnge.
MATRIMONIAL PAPER.
BtAmruLi.1 iLLutmuxED.
Devoted to M&triinony. Literature, Art*.
Hume Circle,
etc. Contains many
ritnoninl advertisements for correspon­mat*
dence, etc. Kample cony on receipt
-of
lOcents. /ddres«t
.. INQHANO,
70 La Salle
Street, Chicago, Illinois.
ST. PAUL SASH AKD E008 CO.
Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, Frames, Etc.
Office N. W. corncr Third and Jackson street*
Rooms 2 and 8 Ilnle Block.
Estimates on Odd Work Promptly Furnished
ST. PAUL, MINN.
^ftnles and biRprofltseasily made
S by men or women muking less
than $40 per week. Wo guarantee
the very host
ehanco In America
for live men and vsommx to make
money. An iik'«~nt writes: "Your i»lan brine* the
money quick."Morrill MfgCo.(0.1».43j Chicago.
:-uTn CO^days by
lr»
m.51 »net le licit*
ed. Guaranteed the
Trues,combined.
only ono In tbe world Roncratinff
ucontlnnous
Electric &
'ntrrenU BcUmttflc, Powerful, Durable,
Comfortable and Effective. Avoid frauds.
Over 9.CM)0 eurtKl. HonrtStnmpfornamphloti
AJ.KO ELEOTltIO UKI.TK FOft IUSEAKKK.
UB.
HOiftE,
IUVENTOB, 181
tho "rin nwANn'1.«-n«l forde«erlntivo citalotfuo to A .T TQ'.v Kit. Slniniu.x St.. Hn»?mi. Ma*
ST. PAUL JOBBERS' DION.
WABASH AYE. CHICAGO.
AV1BIBBU and Morphine TIaMf Cured In Iftto'
BOflnjK. Refer to 1000 patient* cured
196 B£GrfS in all parts. Dr. tfar&h, Quincy.Mioh.
cured without cutting or burn
ing Address I)U. WAI,K15K,
1JJ5 S. Clurk St Chicago. III.
CONSUMPTION
It*T» a paaiUv* rtmniiy iortu« tbov* by
JUOM/
Ihotut&d* of c*M of th* worst kind toil of lone sUadlm#
b«en cared. !nte*L.»ftutron* ta MY Ulth to .tt
•IBCMT.•
that I will Mad TWO DOTTLES FJiKE. to*e'her with VAU
UABLK TR£AT!9K on tbtt »ny«Qff«rar. Oivo Rv
pr*Mt&4r.0.ftddr«»*. DB, T. X.
61XKTOM, 111 furl 81, ILX
Is The Best
Waterproof Goat
Ever Made.
Don't wnKteyour money on ntntm or rubber coat. The FIRII BRAND RLICKltr
i*ab«olutelv trnf/r and finrfPROor. and will keep you dry In tbe hardest storm
Askinrtbo*"FISH JtRAXD" BUCKKRand taVennother, if your rtorckeeperdoe?
FURNITURE.
Qntnby
St
Abbott.
CRACKERS AND CONFECTIONERY.
Rerrtaford It St C. Co.
Priedeitian
St
Lewis.
DOORS, SASH AND BUNDS.
Rohn Manufacturing Co.
T* A. Abbott
St
Co.
WAGONS AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENT
Mast, Ruiord
St
Ilurwell Co*
C. R. Thurston A Hon.
J* H. Mahler Co.
St* Paul Storage, Forwarding and Iaplf
ment Co.
WINES AND LIQUORS.
Perkins, Lyons St Co*
Geo. Benz & Co.
GRAIN AND COMMISSION.
Origgs Rros.
•. Van Slyke A Co.
FLOUR.
St. Paul Roller Mill Co.
R00FIN6 CORNICES AND MACHINERY.
Scrlbner-LIbbey Co.
LUMBER.
J. P* Gribben Lumber Co*
Rood & Maxwell.
K. T. Humwalt.
C. N. Nelson Lumber Co. »r vx
W. F. Fltteld & Co.
,1ohn Hartm Lumber Co.
Rarronnett Lumber Co.
"Ml
LIME, CEMENT AND PLASTER.
The Northwestern Lime Co.
FUEL. /-O
St. PaulPaclfte Coal St IronCet
Northwestern Fuel Co.
TRUNKS, ETC.
H. 8. Crlppen ft Co.
V-1
STEAM FITTING, TOOLS AND SUPPLIES.
B. F. Osborne.
6UNS, FISHING TACKLE, SP0RTIN6 GOODS
AND GUN MANUFACTORY,
M. V. Kennedy A Bros.
A

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