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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, July 17, 1890, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1890-07-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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ditod bjj IheKurtiu onJalrij'Infbruiatiao
Cmuao, III.
TOT
tho enoourmffoiaoat of Improrpd m-thodi of
Batrjlug. IjifornmUoa npoa all mattm rvWJnc to
Biuufutan of better nod ehe«M asd tubjUDi
r§M nllk will b» rlvoo In fcnewer to qae«tlons midlod to
~)»wn»t6m»0Bddmi.
Tfii Dairy Md
tho
"World's
Fair.
For tlie lluri au ot Dairy Information. By J. II.
MfllirnU, Wiguctkii, III.
Varmers generally suffer under the
practical dillldiltii-s which prevent
them from combining to protect them
M-lvus and generally advance their own
Jbterest. lint in in addition to these
practical difficulties lln-y make moun
tains Wit of mole-hills as regards many
of these diflieultles, and mole-hills out
lit mountains as regards their own im
fortance in the world, socially, politi
cally and financially.
But if this is true of farmers gener
ally,, how much more so is it as regards
the daily farmersV Why! whenever 1
consider this subject 1 am astonished
at the lack of co-operation, at the lack
of self esteem among: men belonging to
the most important industry in the
world. -True! we have no creameries,
Jlo cheese factories, which like certain
breweries have several millions invest
ed in one factory, but on lite other
hand, go into Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin
or New York, and you will meet the
wagon loads of milk on every road,
driviuif to the creameries and checse
taetories, which arc dotted all over like
sugar on a cake after the child has
been handling the sugar box.
It has taken the farmer 40 years to be
eonvinced of the advantage in co-opem
tive dairying. low many years will
it take them to be con inced of the
advantage in extending this co-opera
tion? How many years will it take
them to see that they should co-operate
to secure better dairy education, to se
cure better results from their present
gcattercd co-operation in the shape of
creameries and cheese factories? llow
many vears will it take them to arise
in their dignity arid let their power be
felt? That is the question.
1 have for years critscizeil themanner
in which the managers of state fairs
have made a side show of the dairy
department, but I must say that the
dairy farmers themselves have been
to blame to a very great extent. They
have not asserted their own importance
as they ought to. In their modesty
they look only on what they as indi
viduals are doing, forgetting' that they
are part and parcel of the enormous
dairy engine, which -according to Col.
Littler requires seven times the bank
ing capital ot the United States to keep
it running. Will the coming World's
Fair directors lemember this. 1 fear
not. 1 have heard of no "dairy com
mittee being appointed, have heard of
no reference being made to working
dairies, creameries or cheese factories,
no discussion as to establishing a .Na
tional Dairy school, to be in session
during tho fair. And yet, improving
the average quality of our butter to the
tune of 2c per pound and cheese ]A cent
would add several million dollars to
the national yearly Income.
a as to ha
the directors of tho Illinois State Dairy
men's association have called a meet
ing of delegates from all the state
Dairymen's associations and lrom the
.Breeders association of dairy cuttle to
meet at the Sherman house July ICth,
to put the claim of the dairy before the
directors ot tho Columbian World's
1'air.
Hut this is r.ot enough!—Let every
dairyman, and every dairyman's frientl,
exert all their influence on the national
commisioners as well as on the Chicago
directors so as to make them see the
importance of their department.
Let them do all they can to have
their state assist in throwing up to the
morld the enormous importance of the
dairy industry. Iteraember, united we
stand, divided we fall!
1*. S.—1 am just now informed that
the president of Illinois State dairy
men's association communicated with
thu national commissioners and that a
resolution to appoint a dairy committee
was referred to the committee .on per
manent organization: a gleam of hope!
let us now all put the should to the
tvheel^g
We clip the following from the Mich
igan Dairyman for June, says Hoard's
Dairyman:
TO DKTTk'li-M AKKIIS.
We have discovered a new process,
which we guarantee will make you
one-half more good butter, than you
can make bv the old way of churning-.
Trice $1. A re W
will not advertise the.postoflle.)
We will do better than that. We
will tell, for nothing, how one-half
more really good butter can lie inane
than there is now—and that is to use
the best, most improved processes, so
ttxib poof butter will not be made, as
now, and good butter made from the
same quantity and quality of the milk,
ifut that is not the kind of advice you
will get if you send a dollar to lind out
wha£ kind of deviltry you can practice,
to make more weight of, so-called but
ter come from a churn than tho Lord
or the cow put Into tho milk. Elements
of milk are not created in churn nor
can' folks be fooled
to
lielievc that the
{our pounds of butter in standard milk
tsan have four pounds of any kind of
ultish added to it by a coagulating ma
terial and still make anything of it but
a compound of fat and slush.
4
ft Is not because there is too much
good butter that causes prices of good
butter to be below what thry should be,
tiut it is because there is so much in
fcrior butter that is sold as goodbutter.
Th# supply 'of butter, such as it Is, is
abundant. Hut the supply of good
butter is riot equal to the denuind. If
every consumer knew what good
butter in. the price of the best quality
of butter would be better,
The cow must have good digestion
and assimilation. It is not so much
fcow much she eats sis' how much she
umimilateB, AnUnais sometimes eat
ntuch more than they properly .appro
priate to the work which
tended to
fecilinz
da.
is in­
The cow is the nuichirip. Tho food is
the raw material. Mils,, butter and
ifhefiu) arc the manufactured avticleSi'
iJiiirymau is the'manufacturer.
Sumti.ono,
Htntc of Sonlh Dakota,
VJrsfc Judicial Circuit,
Tri Circuit Court witiiiu and for Turner county.
Henry W. Frost, Plaintiff.
vs.
J. Dunn, Andrcsslfcrfnz,
Knty (Jerinii, Iowa Ixmn
iuul Trust Company and
American Mortgage tsntu
l%uy, defendant*.
The State of Soutli Dakota semis greeting:
To tiio aiMive named defwdauhs.
You are hereby summoned and iT'uuiretl to
answer tins complaint of this action, which will
be hied in the oilieeof the «l«rk of the eh'euit
court tflthiu and for the comity of Turner. State
of Smith Dakota, ut the court house hi l'arker,
county of 'iurner, .South Dakota, am! nerve a
copy of your answer upon thesubscribrn* at their
oUieo, on Thud street, iutheeitv or Yankton.
South Dakota, within thirtv days after the ser
vice of this summon*, exclusive of the day of
service. If yovf fail to answer the complaint
within that time, the plaintiff wilt applvtothe
court for the relief demanded in tho complaint-.
Dated Ht.\anktoa. Nouth Dakota, this 24th
day of Mj«y» A. D., 1SH0.
UAMULK NITON*Kits,
I'iainttttVi Attorneys.
To the above named defendant, tho
Joe/A 1.OAN* AMI liti MT Company.
Take notice that th& complaint hi tlits action
was filed in the olHceoC the clerk of the circuit
court of Turner county In the stut^ of South Da
kota. at i'at ker, in said eountv and state, on the
31st day of May. IKM.
Dated June 21. t&fc).
First publication .June 26.
Notice to C'cdiiorH.
Kstate of Oluua 0. Koii, deceased.
Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned, ad
ministratrix of the cstateofohnisO.Koli.de
ceased, to tho creditors of, :md all persons hav
ing claims against the said deceased, to exhibit
them, with the necessary vouchers, within four
months after tho Hrst publication of this notice,
to the said administratrix at her residence in
ldvlwilde township iu the county of Turner S. D.
Dated at I'arkcr, S. D..
.June hi. l&K).
JiAItKN A. UOLI,
Administratrix of the estate of Olaus O. lloll,
deceased.
Summons Tor Kelicf.
First .luilleial Circuit.
In the circuit court In and for Tinner county.
Sine Jensen, l'lahitill,
vs.
Hans V. C. Jensen. Defendant.,
(i
1M
and to serve a copv of your
answer on the subscriber at his otllce on Center
Ave. in the town of Hurley, South Dakota,
within thirty days after the servlec of tnis
summons, exclusive or the dav of service. If
ywu fall to answer the complaint within that
time, the plaintiff will apply to the court for the
relief demanded in tnc complaint.
Dated at Hurley. S. D.t this id day.of June. A.
D., 1S00.
W. Kixioir,
Hamuli's Attorney.
Uind Ofllce at Yankton. S. Dak.
June toth. tWK).
Notice is hereby given that the following
named settler has filed notice of his intention
to make Unal proof hi support of his claim, ami
that said proof will be made before the Judge or
in his absence before tho clerk of the circuit
court for Turner county, .South Dakota, at I'ar
kcr, the county seat thereof, on Saturday, the
second day of August, u&o, at 2 o'clock'p. in.,
viz:
OJ.IC miUAS AASMITNDSKX.
under his prc-emntlon eutrv No.
KWI
for the
southeast quarter of the northwest quarter of
section No. eighteen in township No. nlnetv
seven north of range No. fifty-live west liftli
P. M.
Jle names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of,
said land vi/.:
Christian Kartenid, (Me Mo^hv, Christian linn
sen, llans Hansen, all of Freejuan, Hutchinson
County S. D.
SALOMON WENZLAFF.
Register
U. S. Land Oifice at Yankton, S. I),
June to. 1890.
Nnamed
OTIOK Is lierebv given that the following
settler has tiled notice of his inten
tion to make final proof in support of his claim,
ami that said proof will be made before the
judge or In his absence before the clerk
of the circuit court, for Turner counjv
South Dakota, at Tarker. the county seat there
of. on Monday, the fourth day of August, 1890,
at 10 o'clock a. m„ viz:
ti S c!
Ut ISTT A N 111 IS TENS ICN,
under his homestead entry No. 8382. for the
southeast quarter of section No. twenty In town
ship No. nhiety-seveu north of range No, fifty
four west fifth. 1\ M.
He names tho following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon,'and cultivation of
said land, viz:
Carl Ch'ixtiunson, Christian M. Nielsen, Peter
Jorgenson, ait of spring Vallev, Turner Co., and
Jens Peter Jorgensen of Swan Lake, Turner
County, s. i.
LAWYER,
—CATIICAKT IlLOCIv-
I'AIiKEIt. DAKOTA
Merchants Hotel,
YANKTON. SOUTH DAKOTA.
II. i\ JJSNCKS, Prop.
Conveniently located, and the only flrst-ckiss
lioiisu In the city.
C. H. Goddard,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
Iiuni-EY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Odlce over Tiiruci County llauk.
LAYNE & CONWAY
Tubular and Artesian Well Drillers
JIUItl.EY, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Iron 1'unips ot nil Descriptions and
l'ump ltepairs.
Water without alkali, atxl a well tliat cannot
be pumped dry guarntitccd, or no pay,
EST'Xo tif.siness transacted on .Snnd.iy._ffJ
PATENTS
CAVEATS. THADK JIAHIvS
fc AXD COI'YIt L01ITS
Obtu'.nrd.mid All oilier bnsijiejn In tlie U,
I'atent oniee ntu-.niled to for MODV.IIATB
l4'FjKSf
Ourolllee Is opposite tlio U, H. l'ntent ORlee
and we can obtain l'alont* in leas time than
tliosexeniote from WASfUKUTOX,
rioiul MODEL Oil HUA U'JKU. We advise
as to patentability free of ehnnie nnd w« make
A'O CHARGE UNLESS WE UliTA T!f PAT
E.Y2',
We refer here to tlie Postmaster. tii« Hunt, of
•Money Order Dlv. mid to omelnln of (lie U. S.
I'atent Offlee. I'or elreulnr, julvico, (erin» and
referitnees to netujil client*
in your own .State or
comity, write to
C. A. SNOW &. CO.
Opposite rateut omen. Washington. I). C.
LIYERY
Sale and Feed Stable,
Norman and Clydsdale Stations
i' Alw.i}
son hanti
Turner County Herald.
1'u'illnlicd Everv Thursday.
HURLEY S..D.,JLTLV N. isoo.
OFFICIAL PAPER.
Ilopubliean State
The
lull.
SALOMON W KNZLA FF,
Register.
S. V. JONES
fei?
Horses. Carriages, IlusgiM-m fact. anylliliiK in
Stwi,l10
wny ot
I*'very—on the shortest
notice, and rm tlia
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.
IX. 11. Kl.'NMXT..
^#1J!??
ijrjey. D, T.
Coii\'ent!or».
The republicans ol Houth Dakota will meet iu
delegate convention hi Mitchell. .South Dakota,
at the opera house on Wednesday, the 2 th day
of Acgitat, tMO, at*2 o'cluek p. m. tor Die purpose
of nhiciiiK In nomination candidates as follows:
i'or two representjaives in congress.
For governor.
For lieutenant governor.
For secretary oi state.
For treasurer.
For auditor.
For ftHorr.ey general.
For superintendent of public instruction.
For commissioner of school and public lauds.
The several comities will be entitled to the
following representation
County Delegates
Aurora 8
Headle Ill
Brown
JL\Ul:t,R rtUOTf!:!(*•
riaiiitlirs Attorneys.
UrooKIng^
Count Delegates
Hughes 7
Uuieluusun 7
Hyde..- 4
...T2
•lerauld
Buffalo
Mrule
ilou llouuue....
llutte
t'lister
Campbell
Clark
Codington
Charics Mix....
Clay
J»ay
Douglass
Deuel
Davison
Kiliuunds
Fall lSlvur
Faulk
(jraut
ilamlSn
llaml
Hanson,
...18
7
Kingsbury 15
l^ike 14
Lawrence *24
Lincoln 15
McCook 8
Mcl'hcrsou 7
Marshall 9
Meade
Miner 8
Mlunchaha SG
Moody V2
Fcuuiugton 10
Totter
Kobcrts 4
Sanborn
Sjdnk
sullv
Turner
Union
Walworth
Yankton.
6
.. ..C
...J5
...15
8
..13
I
*.!a
..10
..8
...4
.10
8
...a*
... .4
...15
1 1
....5
11
II
8
,:i:i
7
Total
11.
,}
The State of South Dakota sends greeting:
To Hans l\ ('. Jensen, defendant.
You are herein* summoned and required to
answer the complaint in this action, which
will he filed in the oflltv ot the clerk of the
circuit court within and for the county
of Turner, State of South Dakota, at the
court house in the town of i'arkcr, county of
Turner. S.
..53C
Hy order of the committee. Dated at Aberdeen
South Dakota, May 9. lS'.Ki.
CIIAUI.KST. MCCOY,
WM.
STI:I:I.IXO, Chairman.
Secretary.
Republican Convention,
The republicans of Turner county will hold a
delegate convention at Opera Hall, I'arkcr, on
representation in
tlie county convention will be one delegate fioin
each vottajj precinct and one additional delegate
for each 25 votes, or major fraction thereof cast
for A.C. Mellette for governor at the general
election held October i, isstf. The voting pre
cincts will be entitled to the following number
of delegates:
T. It. Del. *1. It. jvi.
00-52 9 100—52
97-52 4 IM—fa 5
93-52 3 W—53 5
99-52 2 98-53 fi
99-53 II 99—01 4
100 —53 4 100-.'! 3
97—51 5 97—55 3
93 -52 3 08-55 3
99-55 4 100—55 3
The committee recommend that the primaries
in each precinct be held at 2 o'clock p. m.. on
Monday, August IK, 1890. at the usual polling
place, unless otherwise Ordered by local member
of the committee, and if anv change or time or
place, is made, the same shall be piibllslicd in the
nearest republican newspaper in the county, at
least one week before such primary is held, and
a notice shall be posted on tlie door of the build
ing In which such primarv is to be held.
Dated at Parker. .June 2t, 1S90.
lly order of the committee.
S. V.
JOXF5*,
A. W. HACUX, Chairman.
Secretary.
president has signed tho silver
Trains
are now running to the
river at Fore3t City, 1'otter
Missouri
county.
Davison county delegates to the state
conveniion are instructed to support
Geo. A. Johnston I'or governor.
Tlie bill opening to settlement, a por
tion of the l' ort llandall military res
ervation has passed both houses ot
congress.
The Salem Special has closed the
fourth year of its existence, and Jiditor
Patten is to be congratulated upon the
success he has attained.
One of tlie most disastrous storms
ever recorded in the northwest occurred
Sunday on Lake Pepin, by which a
pleasure steamer was overturned and
seventy-five or more persons lost their
lives.
From parties who heard Judge Shan
non's address at Elk l'oint at the -lUi
of July celebration we are given to
understand that it was one of the most
masterly efforts ever listened to in tho
west. No one familiar with Judge
Shannon will doubt his ability in any
public position which he may bo placed.
Democrats have recently been claim
ing South Dakota, and tho recent
shower of snakes at Pierre seems to
indicate that they have begun to pull
off their boots and wade into the can
vass.—Chicago Inter Ocean.
We are glad these ".snakes" made
their appearance before the South Da
kota editors made their visit to Pierre.
The only resolution passed by the in
dependent convention at lluron was
that we are firmly and ultimately
oxjposed to the assessment of our nom
inees for campaign purposes." JS'o
danger of JJro. Hackett ever wanting
to join that party he is too fond of
making assessments. If war horses
ot Col. Poster's stamp wero ut the
head, however, things would be held
level.
As will bo seeu by an item taken
from tho Pinrro Press, and published
elsewhere in those columns, thirty in
surance companies, who had. placed
their advertising business with Lord &
Thomas, of Chicago, have withdrawn
the same from the hands ot that firm,
and the business wiil r.ow be given out
by Auditor Taylor, ut legul rates, to
those who are entitled to the same.
Auditor Taylor has stood by the fra
ternity like man and a brother, and
by united efforts the law him been en
forced in spirit and to the letter. Xow
let the boys stand by Auditor Taylor,
and the state convention which is to
meet at Mitchell Aug. 27th, will ac
knowledge the justness of their claim
and he will be unanimously renominat
ed and re-elected by tho republicans to
tho olllce which he now tills so satis
factorily.
Tlie Nmv«trtiinr ilnyx an Toj),
Pierre Free I'ro±t,
Col Thos. liutas, a prominent attorney
of Chicago, has been in th-s city it day or
two on business and left for home this
morning. He represented some thirty
insurance companies who havo been
kicking on the requirements made of
them by Auditor Taylor, particularly
on the matter of publishing annual
statements. They ul placed this part
of the business with Lord & Thomas,
advertising agents, who were of course
working the local papers in the state
for way down rates. The result of his
visit is thatthis business was taken out
L^Lah!^I^?r,l&.nh.0,maS
in the hands of Mr. Taylor, where they
belong and tlie thirty companies \vi|J
pay tho regular ralt's,
r.
WASHINGTON LETTER.
From our Eosulur Coircslwimlciil.
WASHINGTON.
JUl.Y 7,1800.
Senator Pryo disappointed some of
the ardent friends ot the river aud
harbor bill because he did not antago
nize tho McKinly tarill bill with that
iiu'iisur?, which he is in charge of,
when Senator Morrill, in charge of the
tar.ll bill, called up that measure -and
opi-nid the debate thereon. There is
no man in congress more anxious than
Senator Prye, chairman of tho com
merce committee, to have the river
and harbor bill passed, but in view of
the fact that the president is already
half, if not wholly disposed to be hos
tile to the Kiver and harbor bill, he
probably concluded that it would not
be good policy to attempt to force con
sideration of that measure at the time.
He said to-day that the bill would cer
tainly pass, but he declined to express
an opinion as to whether it would be
signed by Harrison.
Circumstances have caused the de
bate on the tarill bill, which began in
tho senate to-day, to assume much
more interest than was expected for it
a short time ago. The principal reason
for this is the expectation on the part
of the democratic senators that when
the tarill' bill is disposed of the federal
election bill will bo taken up. This
the democrats say they will prevent if
they have to talk on the tariff bill until
tho 4th of next March when the lifty
lirst congress expires. Strange to say,
the democrats appear to be much more
certain that tho federal election bill
will become a law than do the republi
cans, most of whom speak doubtfully
of it. My own impression is that the
federal election bill will not be voted
upon by the senate at this session none
of the republican senators who enthu
siastically favor the bill have the in
lluence and power in the senate which
enabled Speaker lleetl, who litis proven
himself to be the greatest legisla
leglslative power of tho present genera
tion, to force it through tlie house
besides the republicans throughout the
country havo not up to this time mani
fested enough interest in the uteasuro
to stir up the luke-warm senators of
their party.
The silver problem remains unsolved
in spite of almost constant meetings of
tho house and senato conferees. The
silver men have stated their ultimatum
to be the purchase of 4,500,000 ounces
of silver per'month, and the making of
the certificates issued therefor full
legal tender for all purposes and good
for either gold or silver. [The bill has
since passed and become a law.]
Por tho first time since the comple
tion of the capitol, tlie United States
flag—four of them—waved over the
dome of that building on Independence
day although congress was not in ses
sion.
Ths senators and members looked
considerably refreshed after their three
days holiday, as they took their respec
tive seats to-day never has congress
worked harder than it did during the
month of June which was also the
warmest June Washington has ex
perienced in years.
Idaho is now a full Hedged state, and
the forty-third star was officially added
to tho United States Hag on the 4tli
inst. Owing to the fact that the sen
ate adiled an amendment before passing
the house bill for the admission of
Wyoming, that measure is still hung
up in the house, and the forty-fourth
star will not be added to the Hag until
the lourth of next uly.
Vice-President Morton who has gone
away for the summer, is said to have
hurried off because he dreaded the par
liamentary responsibility of presiding
over the senate during the tariff debate.
Senator Ingalls who will preside until
ilr. Morton returns, does not fear that
responsibility, nor anything else if he
does, nobody has yet discovered what it
is.
Serious trouble is feared with Great
Britain over the Behring Sea fisheries,
and although Mr. Blaine has gone to
Bar Harbor for the summer, at least
it is so given out, his return here at
auy time will not bo surprising as it is
known that he is strongly in lavor
of going to the extreme of using force
if it becomes necessary to protect
American interest in those waters.
And this is a question in which politics
uro lost sight of and nine-tenths of tho
people are with Mr. Blaine in main
taining our rights.
Just what business, in addition to the
regular appropriation bills, the house
will take up this week has not been
mado public to-day under the rules is
individual suspension day, that is, any
member who can get unanimous con
sent may call up any bill on the calen
dar. Later there will probably be a
scramble by the different committees
as to what shall be taken up. The elec
tion committee has several contested
election cases ready, and it is believed
that somo of them will bo acted on this
week but It nil depends on tho com
mittee on rules.
Mr. Harrison will return to-morrow
from Cape May, whero he has been
with his family since Tursday. It was
his first visit to Mrs. Harrison's new
cottage.
Parkston Advance: The capital
question and the stand taken by somo
of the papers over the state on the in
dependent movement has caused some
of them to be boycotted by their mer
chants and the alliance. This is en
tirely wrong, for a paper will stay just
the same, and a poorly supported paper
reflects discredit on the town it is in.
There is no use of one class trying to
dictate the'course of the paper, for
there are others who have, as much
right is they, and whether a majority
or hopeless minority every man has a
right to his views on all matters, and
when an editor does not follow his own
belief for fear of someone stopping
their paper or taking an ad out he is
not fit to run a paper. People havo
right to differ on all matters and no
on or an an to
Uro. Poore, of tho Yankton Tolc
gram says J5ro. Brown of the.Hurley
ilorald "must bo something worse
than a -back number,' in fact a veri
table chump." lleally, Bro. Brown
does deal in back numbers to consider
able extent.—I'arkcr New Era.
Yfes, we wero a "chump" to ever
a.nd pl.a.cfed ,l.llow A«orney
(now Editor) Poore of
the Yankton Telegram to run as largo
a bill for advertising in the Herald as
wo did,
St
Is
Slacking Flax.
A FEW I'OlXTKKS IN KEFKKKNOE TO
Tin: STACKING OF FLAX.
A. 11. Stevens under the direction of
the Chicago Board of trade, has pre
pared the following circular:
To protect a matured field of flax by
placing in stack at the proper time is a
test of the acumen and thrift of the
owner. It is the alert farmer who rises
to a full comprehension of -what the
critical period of flax farming demands:
his activity is stimulated by the knowl
edge that neglect or a slight delay in
housing involves a depreciation in
value and that it might be the cause of
the loss of his crop.
Tho solubility of flax seed in water
is such that its exposure to rain, how
ever slight causes decreased weight and
lessened value, while heavy and con
tinued rains have frequently destroyed
all that was left, unprotected.
Flux seed that has been exposed in
the Held to the sun's rays until it is dry
to brittleness, still holds a latent mois
ture, which will develop when the seed
is confined in mass and result in heat
and decomposition.
The above will explain to the country
shipper why so much of his new seed
grades "rejected" or "no grade." A
wagon-load of uncured seed- although
dry to the touch—will, when placed in
a car or warehouse bin, in warm
weather, become damp and warm.
Flax seed threshed when in the dry
condition described above, is liablo to
bo much broken and pulverized tho
stock will also break and be intermixed
with the seed thereby increasing the
impurity.
In the inspection analysis of such
broken and pulverized seed much must
be classed its impurity, to the detriment
of the shipper. Tho above being true,
the waste at the threshing floor must
he very large.
Look on the reverse side. Should
rain fall on the ilax exposed on the
field while waiting for the machine or
for other reasons, the straw becomes
rotten and great difficulty is encoun
tered in threshing, and the seed is unfit
for storage and will not grade number
one.
The reason why the western culti
vator of flax annually breaks down tho
flax seed market by throwing thereon
in sixty duvs one-half of the crop, and
that largely unlit for storeage, has been
an unsolved problem, but the reason is
found in that general, but ruinous
habit of threshing from the field—for
to thresh is to sell.
Having described some of the atten
dant dangers of tho matured flux crop,
1 will suggest how these dangers may
be easily avoided.
Well dried flax when stacked is
reasonably secure, and is in positin to
yield a good return for labor. The
sweat incidental to stacking passes
the seed to that indispensable condition
necessary to storage. It also i.nparts a
toughness to tho seed covering, and
straw, which protects the former from
breakage by the machine and gives the
latter a desirable pliant tenacity.
il
With the million acres of flax grown
in the west held well in hand, by rea
son of being gathered in barns and
stacks, the owners, in place of breaking
down the market, might control it, or,
at least, they would be in a position to
take advantage of any ad vance.
The flax having been properly stack
ed, it bccomes by easy transition, when
threshing day conies, flax-straw stacks,
retaining at least one half the value it
had before being deprived of the seed.
Tho coarse, uninviting (lax-straw is
a true forage, as it is eaten with avidity
and relish by all kinds of stock, giving
a vigorous growth to the young a
healthy thriving condition to the full
grown, and a shining coat to all, which
is admirable proof that its constituents
are in harmony with their organism.
But the above is the least of its val
ue. It has impoverished the farmers'
acres, but is prepared to repay with
interest. It is estimated that each acre
ot flax grown takes from the soil fifty
pounds of alkalies and twenty pounds
of j)hosphoric acid, which shows that
it is a most exhaustive plant. The
seed, which is the only part removed
from tho farm, contains but a small
portion of the mineral manures taken
from the soil, therefore the flax straw
retains nearly all tho ingredients with
drawn. It is a natural sequence that
when it is led to stock and returned to
the land in the form of larm-yard ma
nure, the equilibrium of its fertility is
maintained.
OIUTUAKY.
SUDDEN DEATH OF CiEN. JOHN C. FKli-
MONT AT NEW VORIv SUNDAY.
J»rew York, July 13,— General, John
Charles Fremont, the first candidate of
the republican party for president, died
at tiio home of his adopted daughter,
the wife of Col 11. M. Harter, 49 West
Twenty-fifth street, at 3 30 o'clock this
aftrenoon Ills death was duo to in
flammation of the bowels. There wero
present at his demise his son, Lieut, J,
C. Fremont, of tho navy, und his physi
cian, Dr. Wm. J.Morton. His sickness
was of comparatively brief duration
and dated in its first stage from the ex
cessive heat of last Tuesday, Tho fol
lowing day ho experienced somo pain,
and Thursday was worse, but did not
complain. Matters assumed so much
worse a turn on Friday that ho sont for
a physician. Tho doctors advised the
sick man take a sail and get a littlo
fresh air. While ho was out on tho
water ho got a cold chill. Friday night
he sent for Dr. Morton again. On the
following morning (Saturday) tho dis
ease developed enough to show its true
character (perltontis), but even then
tho case wfas not considered dangerous
and a dispatch to that effect was sent
to Seabright. Tho final dissolution
was sudden. The general was 77 years
and 6 months old, to-day, at the time of
his death.
John CharlcB Fremont was born in
Savannah, Ga., Jan. 21,1813. He was
educated at Charleston college, and at
an early «£e entered the United States
engineering corps. In 1842 he under
took tho first ot the memorable expe
ditions into the Kocky mountain region
that rosulted in the opening up of that
region, and won for the gallant young
explorer the sobriquet, Tho Pathfind
er of the l{ouky Mountains," which has
over since cluug to lum. In 1815 ho
AYasr in California at the time of the
mimMmsk*
memorable uprising among the Mexi
cans, and became leader of the move
ment, and when California declared
herself independent of Mexico was
elected governor. After the war he
resumed his explorations, surveying a
route from the Mississippi river to San
Francisco. In. 1849 he was sent as ono
of the first senators from California to
tiio United Slates senate.. In 18&0 he
was the first nominee of the republican
party for president, receiving 114 votes
against Mr. Buchanan's 174. In 1801-02
ho served in tho union army, with the
rank of major-general, .lie conceived
a plan for dislodging tho confederates
from the entire valley of the Missis
sippi riyer, and opening that stream to
union vessels. The plan proposed by
him has sincc been indorsed by tho
most eminent authorities in military
matters of tho period. But just as he
was ready to carrry it into execution
he was removed from his command by
Gen. Scott, for no reason that hits eyer
been very well understood.
Sincc tho war he has been a promi
nent liguro in national affairs. For
some years lie was interested in a pro
ject for a southern transcontinental
railroad. Ho was governor of Arizona
from 1878 to 1882. He was recently
placed on the retired list of the army,
with the rank of major-general.
Normal Institute.
TO BE HELD AT ILUITLEY, COMMENCING
JULY 28, AND CONTINUING
TIIKEE WEEKS.
FELLOW TEACHERS:
'Having decided to hold a three
weeks normal school, I desire to call
attention to the following points:
1st. As our institutes heretofore
have been too short to admit of much
else than a discussion of methods of
teaching, this school is intended more
particularly to help you to a better
knowledge of the text books.
2nd. This will enable many of y&u
to raise the grades of your certificates,
thereby insuring you better remunera
tion for your services.
3d. Instruction will be given in the
following branches: Algebra, geome
try, natural philosophy, physical geog
raphy, civil goyernment, book keep
ing and the common brandies. In
order to secure the fullest benefits for
each individual there will be two classes
in a partof the branches, one beginning
at percentage in arithmetic and the
other at common fractions.
4th. Board need not exceed S2.50
per week. This is assured.
5th.. In order that the cost of tuition
may be made as low as possible the
registration fee has been fixed at §3.00,
this being the smallest amount with
which the increased expenditures can bo
safely undertaken,
(ith. School directors are cordially
invited to visit the school whenever
convonient and the undersigned will
be glad to assist them in securing
teachers for their schools.
7th. An examination will be held at
the close of the term for the benefit of
those who may desire to renew or raise
the gr^do of their certificates.
As the subjects will be taught by
topical outlines you can use to good
advantage any text books that you may
have. Bring all of your books, no
matter how old they may be, but should
you have no text books on algebra, get
Wentworth's, and on geometry, Went
worth's latest revised elementary
edition will be the best.
An effort will be made to establish
a regular outline of study to cover at
least two or three years' time, and to
so correspond with the courses in tho
high schools of our county that a
student may be credited at tho high
schools with the full time spent at the
normal.
The citizens of Hurley will do all in
their power to make it pleasant for
those in attendance.
Advanced pupils in the public schools
and all who intend to teach at some
future time will do well to attend.
Teachers desiring to secure boarding
plages will do well to write to Prof. A.
J, Allen, Hurley, not forgetting to in
form him as to the number of. persons
who may wish to board or room at tho
same place.
Teachers are particularly requested
to be on hand at 8:30 a. m. the first day
if possible that no time may be lost in
forming the classes.
Any correspondence for further par
ticulars will bo promptly and checrfully
answered by Prof. M. L. Abbott at
Parker, Prof. A. J. Allen at Hurley, or
the undersigned at Centreville.
Yours very truly,
C. SALMON,
Co. Supt. of Schools.
Independent State Ticket.
Following is tho ticket nominated at
tho independent convention at Huron:
Pepresentutives in congress—Fred C.
Zipp, of the Ulack Hills, and Frank
Leavltt, of Lincoln county.
Governor—II. L. Loucks, of Deuel.
Lieutenant-Governor—A. L, Van
Osdel, of yankton.
Secretary of Stuto—1». M. Hanson, of
Sillier county,
Treasurer—F, 11. Roberta, of CI runt
county.
Auditor—J. R. Lowe, of Urulecounty.
Attorney-Uenenil—S, W. Cosand, of
Potter county,
Superintendent of Public Instruction
—E. A. Dye, of Spink county.
Commissioner of School and Public
Lands—F. F. Myers, of Sanborn county.
Labor Commissioner—AV. L. John
son, of Urown county.
As recommendation for United States
senators was also on the call, it was
unanimously decided to expunge it
therefrom antl to elect the legislature
first.
Louis Weber has a four weeks old
heifer calf which has no horn button or
sign or mark to designate the horn. The
call's dam was dehorned at six months
old and the sire at four years old mak
iug dehorned parents. Now tho ques
tion is did tlie dehorning of the parent/
affect the offspring? Some claim this is
a natural result, other that tho dehorn
ing of tlie ancestors should be further re
moved. However it is, the call is there
and has 110 horns. Lot those explain it
who can.—Alexandria llei ild
Capt. \V, V. Lucas, of Chamberlain
is being mentioned us a probable candi
date for a congressional nomination at
UichauUb ufthu lcpubliciuicuuventiou
Noxious AVccda.
Pursuant to the provisions of chapter
116, laws of 1890. the time for the de
struction of Russian thistle, Canada
thistle, and Cockle Burr upon all lands,
and highways Turner county, Is
fixed as the 10th day of August, and all
persons owning or occupying lands in
said county, are hereby notified to de
stroy such weeds before said time, in
such manner as to prevent their bear
ing seed.
By order Board County Commission
ers.
July 11th, 1890.
M. J. IIOGAN, County Clerk.
Noticc to School OtncoiK and I'litrons.
The undersigned is in Parker on the
first Monday in each month for the
purpose of attending to any school
matters that may bo brought before
him, Respectfully,
1
""NY» 9"
COKTEZ SALMON.
Epoch.
The transition from long, lingering
and painful sickness to robust heaith
marks an epoch in the life of the indi
yidual. Such a remarkable event is
treasured in the memory and the agency
Whereby the good health has been
attained is greatfully blessed. Hence
it is that so much is heard in praise of
Electric Bitters. So many feel they
owe their restoration to health, to the
use of the great Alternative and Tonic.
If you are troubled with any disease of
kidneys, liyer or stomach, of long or
short standing you will surely find
relief by use of Electric Bitters. Sold
at 50o. and 81 per bottle at Pioneer
Drug Store. 3
A. A. BASYE,
A E N E A N I E
WAGON WORK A SPECIALTY.
All work Guaranteed.
Hard wood lumber kept to
Stout Bros.' blacksmith sbpp
retail, Shop at
Grain for Sale.
3.000 BUSHELS OF CORN,
at 30 cents per bushel.
1,200 BUSHELS OF OATS.
at 25 cents per bushel.
For Sale by
GEO. WARNER.
1% miles west of Hurley.
HURLEY DRAY LINE,
D. C. WARD, Proprietor.
All Orders Promptly At
tended to and
GOODS CAREFULLY HANDLED.
CASH!
ChallioH, good last colors,
Standard Prints,
Gingnams,
Good Bleached Muslin,
to 20 per cent.
JAS. STOUT.GEO. RROTTT
"4
'\Jl
Stout Bra's,
BLACKSMITHS.
THE
not draw or
1,003
mieke
pucker tho finest fab­
ric. Never snaps or breaks poor brown
or blue thread. It is a charmer.
"WHEELER & WILSON MFG. Co.,
185 and 187 Wabash Ave., Chicago.
•m
I1UHLEIV DAKOTA.
Having recently made additions to our
shop and stock, wo are better
prepared than ever before
to do work promptly
and with perfect
satisfaction. g|
CHICAGO
AND
NORTH-WESTEM
RAILWAY.
THE DIRECT THROUGH LINK TO
5' CHICAGO,
AND ALL POINTS EAST,
Is so operated as to meet tho requirements At
through and local travel, providing fast thruitk
through trains with close connections lor
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS.
SIOUX CITY. COUNCIL BLUTF8
SAN
OMAHA. DENVER.
FRANCISCO, PORTLAND
And all points in
MONTANA,
WASHINGTON,
OREGON,
CALIFORNIA and
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Palace Sleeping and Dining cars are
run on all through trains.
Colonist Sleeping Cars on the Denver
Limited.
For time of trains, tickets and all Information
apply to station agents of tbe Chloago & North
western Railway, or to tho General Passenger
Agent at Chicago.
W. H."
NEWMAN,
M. WHITMAN,
3d VIeo-I'res. Gen'l Manager,
W. A. TRAM.,
Gen'l Pass, and Tlotcet Agt.
BUTTER
IF YOU MAKE
01.<p></p>CHESE
Farm Rutter-making Apparatus,
Farm Rutter-raaking Supplies,
Factory Ruttcr-niaking Apparatus,
Factory Butter-making Supplies,
Creamery Butter-making Apparatus,
Creamery Butter-making Supplies,
Farm Cheese-making Apparatus,
Farm Cheese-making Supplies,
Factory Cheese-making Apparatus,
Factory Cheese-making supplies,
OF
D. H. ROE & CO,,
We deal in Groceries, Flour,
Salt, Crockery, Glassware, No
tions and jewelry.
And you will find it to your interest to buy
your.
E O O O S
at ALLEN BBO'S, where you will find a
good assortment, consisting of
253,255 & 257 E.KInzie St.,
WHITE GOODS, DRESS GOODS,
LAWNS, CHALLIES, SATTEENS, ETC.
All-over and Skirting Embroideries
and Laces.
"V/, IN SHOES
CHICAGO ILL.il
If you have not tried Chr. Hansen's
Danish Butter Color and Rennet Tab
lets, try them. The best makers use
th em.
THIS PAPEE
Advertising Bm^tt(109prnce^Lwteresl»erMfi*!
contracts may bo mado for It
XJV H.
Good goods sold cheap.
J. W. KELLAR.
CASH! CASH!
SUMMER IS HERE!
CASH!
goods for
produce
We will sell our
CASH or farm
SECURED PAPER only, and
will not be undersold by any
one. Buy of us a Coupon
Credit Book and keep your
own accounts.
or
from 0
We have a' good line for Ladies. Children
and Men. Remember that on anything in
the shoe line we guarantee to save you
Don't forget that wo pay as much for Eggs and Butter as' any one. and we will
save you from 5 to 15 cents on every dollar's
worth of goods you buy.
Yours for trade,
New Stock and Prices to Suit the limes.,^
CALL AND SEE MY GOODS BEFORE BUYING.
Coffins and Undertaker'Furnishing Goods,,
Prop. .'
oent,s up,
*5
8
OK
4
15
ALLEN BRO'S.
HURLEY FURNITURE STORE.'

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