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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, March 05, 1896, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1896-03-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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STATE DIRECTORY.
STATE OFFICERS.:™
€. H. SHELDON Governor
•C. N. HKBRIKl) Lieutenant Governor
THOS. THORSON Secretary
J. E. HIPPLE Auditor
..KIRK G. PHILLIPPS Treasurer
C. X. CRAWFORD Attorney General
PRANK CRANE.....
Supt. Public Instruction
,T. L. LOOlCH ART. .Supt. School & Pub Lands
S. A."WHEELER .. Com. Labor and Statistics
K. P. PETT1GREW U. S. Senator
J. H. KYLE U. S. Senator
J. A. PICKLER Member of Congress
K. J. GAMBLE Member of Congress
DlGHTON CORSON Supreme Court Judge
D. HANEY Supremo Court Judge
PULLER Supremo Court Judgo
COUNTY DIRECTORY.
COUNTY OFFICERS.
WM. ELLIOTT
ROBERT WAY
C. M. PIER
L. L. PLEEGER
S. H. IWNCHER
P. K. BERRY
7.KH STOUT
J. V\ Vv ATSON
T. P. COLLINS
UR. D. D. HAGGARD
JAMES ZUVEK
County Judge
Clerk of Court
Register of Deeds
State's Attorney
'. Auditor
Treasurer
Sheriff
Supt. of Schools
Surveyor
Coroner
Assessor
CODNTY COMMISSIONERS.
JACOB HOEFUNGER First District
I. II. NEWBY Second District
J. R. LAMBERTZ Third District
ANDREW KAUFFMAN Fourth District
A. W.BACON Fifth District
HURLEY DIRECTORY.
TOWN OFFICERS.
T. J. HILL Trustee, First Ward
D. DWYER. Sit, Trustee, Second Ward
J. A. SCOTT Trustee, Third Ward
PETER ALLEN Clerk
P. S. VAUGHAN, Treasurer
S. D. WHITE Marshal
Board meets on the second Monday evening
of each month at 8 o'clock t. m.
CHURCHES.
PRESBYTERIAN Services every Sabbath
morning at 11 o'clock Sabbath school at IS.
Evening sorvioo at 8 on each alternate Sab
bath. Prayer meeting on Wednesday even
ing ut 8 o'clock. OHAS. E. SHAUP.
Pastor.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL.—Services every
Sunday at II a m. and 7:30 p. m. Sabbath
nohool immediately after morning services.
Prayer mooting Thursday evenings at 7:30.
E. W. Altera, pastor.
SECRET SOCIETIES,
HURLEY LODGE No. 75, I. O. O. F.—Meets
evory Saturday evening at 8 o'clock, in Odd
Fellows Hall. All brothers Invited to attend.
S. D. White, N. G. J. H. Farnsworht, R. S.
J3 S. McCOOK POST, No. 31, G. A. R.—Meets
on each Saturday evening preceedidg full
moon in each month at 7 p. m.,inG. A. it.
Hall. Goo. L. Palmer, Commander H.J.
Sanborn, Adit.
JOPPA LODGE A. P. and A. M.—Meets at Odd
Fellows Hall on the Tuesday evening on or
before the full of tlio moon. All Masons in
uood Btanding are cordially invited to attend.
H. K. Webstor. W. M.: F. B.Williams, Sec'.v.
MODERN WOODMEN OP AMERICA.—Moet
first Wednesday evening of eaoh month at 8
o'clock sharp. J. T. Hogan, Venerable Con
sul W. H. Kobortson, Clerk.
C.&N. W. RY TIME TABLE.
TRAINS GOING EAST.
No. 6, Passenger 2:00 p. m.
.No. 84, Freight a iBOp.jn
TRAINS GOING WEST.
No.5, Passeuger 12:15 p.m.
No. 25, Freight 11:05 u. m.
H. K. Webster. Agent.
POSTOFFICE.
OOloe hours during week 8 a. m. to 8 p. m.
Mall closes for north and west at 12:30 p. m.
Mail closos for cast and south at 1:45 p. m.
Mail to Childstnwn, Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday of each week. Arrives at 13:00 noon,
leaves at 1:30. P. M.
A. M. RASMUSSEN. Postmaster.
well begun Is half done, ifiegln
well by getting Ferry's Seeds.
Don't lot ohnnco determine
your crop, but plant Ferry's
Seeds. Known..and sold
everywhere.'
efore you plant,'get
Ferry
's Seed Annual
for 1896. Contains more prac
tical Information for farmers
and gardeners than many high
priced text books. Mailed free.
1. II. FKHUY CO., DKTBOIT, HIC1I,
..THE.<p></p>ELDREDGE
a*.-®?
«g»
•A strictly high-grade Family Sewing
Machine, posaesilng all modern
improvements.
GUARANTEED EQUAL TO THE BEST
Prices very reasonable. Obtain tliem
from your looal dealer and make
comparisons.
1LDREDGE MANUFACTURING CO,
BELVIDERE, ILL.
HAWAII, THE PEARL OF
THE PACIFIC."
The Eighth of a Scries of Letter!*
.by John R. Musick,
Author of The Coluiiililun Historic-ill
.. Novel*," lirothur AKiiiiiitt
si-. Hrutlier," etc., etc.
Ilnwulian Holidays i.inl Uow Tliey A.rc
Observed.
Copyright. 18DG, by Funk & Wngnalls Co.,N. Y.)
The Hawaiian holidays are twelve in
number, and area strange mingling of
American, European, and Asiatic civil
and religious observances. January 1st
is a holiday, being New Years day
January 17th is a holiday, in celebra
tion of the downfall of monarchy
February 12th is Chinese New Year
March 17th, Kamehauieha Ill's, birth
day Good Friday May 24th, birthday
of Queen Victoria May 30th. Decora
tion Day June 11th, ivamehameha
Day July 4th, birthday of the .Republic
and American Independence Novem
ber 28th, .Recognition of Hawaiian In
dependence Thanksgiving day and
Christmas. If all holidays are kept as
Christmas, the llawaiians will not
soon forget the several events they cele
brate.
I left Kailaua on December 23, 1895,
on the Inter-Island Steamer W. G.
Hall, for Honolulu, and was surprised
to find tho steamer crowded with
people of all possible shades of com
plexion and stations in life, all bound
for Honolulu to spend the holidays.
The school teacher from Hawaii, the
clerk and plantation manager from
Maui, all boarded the Hall for the capi
tal citv. Quite a gay party of fair and
dark ladies and gentlemen were assem
bled on the deck of the steamer as she
plied the waters, and guitars and ban
jos were brought out, singing and in
strumental music being the order until
late hour.
By daylight on the 24th we were at
the dock in Honolulu. The day was as
warm as one in uly. Men went about
in white duck suits and straw hats,
many of the natives were barefooted,
and, so far as the weather was con
cerned, there was no indication what
ever of Christinas. Hut the shops dis
played the usual amount of Christmas
toys, the churches were decorated with
Christmas trees, aud it only lacked cold
weather and winter garb to make one
sure it was Christmas indeed.
When evening came on I walked out
on the streets and found them all bril
liantly lighted up, and the shop men
doing a thriving business. Fort street
and Hotel street-, and other principal
streets, were thronged with men,
women, ami children so that one could
scarcely squeeze his
way through, It
almost reminded one of Fourteenth
and Twenty-third streets, New York,
during the holiday trade.',
Shop windows were tilled with toys,
trinkets, and holiday presents, some
displayed with the most excellent taste.
Articles of bright colors seemed to at
tract the natives most. The Hawaiian
loves the beautiful, the gaudy, the bril
liant. He does not always display the
most approved of tastes in the selec
tion of colors, for blue and pink, red
and yellow are liable to be mingled
promiscuously in the makeup of his or
her dress.
An incident attracted my attention
which will illustrate what- it is be in a
tropical country during the Christinas
holiday's. I saw a great throng of na
tives gathered in front of a confection
ery shop on Fort street, wlm seemed to
be greatly excited and talking rapidly
in their native language, the object
which was attracting their attention
being evidently on the sidewalk. One
put- Iris finger forward as if to touch
some object and suddenly jerked it
away again as if the creature was
'alive and had bitten him. pressed
forward to get a glimpse of the wonder
anil it proved to be—a large square
cake of ice. That ice attracted more
attention than anything on exhibition
that evening. In the center of it was
frozen some California fruit, and the
natives stood around it. occasionally
touching it with their lingers, until it
melted entirely away, which was late
in the night.
Christmas was celebrated here more
as Fourth of July than Christmas.
The Kanaka boy does not know how to
celebrate it he cannot make a noise,
and fire crackers are his heart's delight.
He discharges them by the bundle in
imitation of the Chinese, and not sing
ly as the American boy does. All
night long on Christmas Eve the fire
crackers were popping, and they con
tinued during all the next day. There
were services in all the churches and
Sunday schools similar to such services
in the United States on Christmas Day.
The native churches had their Christ
mas trees, the different American and
the European churches their trees and
appropriate ceremonies. The Chinese
and Japanese Christian churches, in
imitation of their white brothers, also
had Christmas trees and devotional
services.
I attended the Japanese M.E. church
Christmas tree. The hall in which the
services were conducted was beautiful
ly decorated with a large fern tree in
one corner, ornamented with candles
and tinsel paper,
and loaded with pretty
presents. The entertainment began by
singing by the Japanese. The music
was tamiliar but the words were not.
Then Kahasaki, one of the Japanese
workers, read a chapter from the bible
in his own language. This was fol
lowed by prayer lrom S. Nishi, an open
ing address by A. Iwamoto, a hymn,
"l'es, Jesus Loyes me'," by seven
Japanese boys this followed by recita
tions in Japanese and English by sev
eral little boys. H. Makano, a boy not
over twelve or fourteen years of age,
delivered an address in English to the
Americans present, which might have
done credit to one much more advanced
in years.
After the benediction came the pre
sentation of gifts. This was novel,
amusing and expensive to a congrega
tion as small and poor as the Japanese,
as in addition to the special gifts on
the Christmas tree for individual
frienas, they provided gifts for visitors
and all, and the house was well crowd
ed with visitors. The pastor of the
church, Rev. II. Kihara, delivered an
address to his people in Japanese, and
he was followed by Rev. H. VV. Feck,
of the Methodist church. Then four
young Japanese went through the
audience and distributed little rolls of
paper about the size of a pipe-stem.
When unrolled each paper was found
to nave a number on it, there being
corresponding number on each package
brought lor distribution. Some of the
presents were quite costly and others
cheap. The calling oil of numbers of
packages and distribution of presents
caused quite a little flutter of excite
ment, as there was considerable in
congruity in the directions they
went, many grown men drawing tin
horns or sewing baskets, while some
ladies received cavalry spurs. My
prize was a set of doll dishes, while
Mrs. Jenkins, from New lork, who
was on her way on a missionary tour
to Japan, drew a boy's sword. I asked
her if she proposed to take Japan with
the sword in the way Mohamet estab
lished his faith.
Hawaii is truly a missionary country
The influence of the missionary is felt
on the streets, in the stores, shops, and
oflices. As a consequence Christmas
is a holiday almost as sacredly kept as
the Sabbath, and I have never been in
any land where the Sabbath was no
sacredly observed. Honolulu has sa
loons, but there is little visible drunk
enness. 1 don't remember having seen
any man under the influence of liquor,
except a few sailors. The enemies of
the present government contemptuous
ly call it the "missionary government,"
because most of the oflicials and heads
of departments are the sons of mission
aries.
During the latter part of Christmas
week a rumor got abroad that Fresi
dent Dole was going to begin the new
year by granting a free and full pardon
to all the remaining political prisoners.
He had pardoned seven on Thanksgiv
ing Day, but eight of those, who had
been the most dangerous rebels in the
outbreak of January, 1805, still re
mained on "The Reefs," as the prison
here is called.
The rumor proved to be well founded.
President Dole, who is one of the kind
est men I ever met, had determined to
set free the remaining prisoners, who
were Chas. T. Gulick, \V. T. Seward.
John F. Bowler, Robert W. Wilcox,
John 11. Wise, Joseph Clarke, J. \V.
iJipikane, and John Lilikoi. At nine
thirty on Now Year's Day, the eight
prisoners were called from their cells
into the prison yard, and there heard
their pardons read with great interest.
The government was represented by
Minister Daman, Attorney Ceneral W.
O. Smith, and Judge J, A. Magoon for
the Board of Frison Inspectors. The
attorney general read the pardons, anil
made a few remarks in kind tones,
which were answered by Major Seward
with sentiments of regard for the
cleuieney extended by the government,
the others showed their appreciation
by grasping the hands of the otlicials.
A large crowd- of interested natives
were gathered at the outside gates,
and when tho Hawaiian prisoners
emerged from their confinement of
eleven months, they were greeted with
loud cheers.
"The Republic is stronger today than
ever, was the universal opinion. That
act of clemency on the part of Dole will
heal over the old sores, and we will
soon be a united people," said one of
the spectators.
This statement was borne out by the
number of royalists present at Presi
dent Dole's New Year reception, the
hearty congratulations and wishes of a
happy New Year, and many of them
Doth to the head of the Republic and
the Republic itself.
President Dole's JS'ew Y'ear recep
tion, just referred to. was held in the
Council Chamber of the Exective build
ing and was one of the most important
and magnificent events in Honolulu
society the writer has had the pleasure
of witnessing. President and Mrs.
Dole showed that courtesy, dignity and
at the same time democracy due from
the heads of a republic and leaders in
society. Mr. and Mrs. Dole are in the
prime of life, gifted with strong com
mon sense, and what he possesses in
executive ability she has as a leader of
society. Mrs. Dole is a graceful and
beautiful lady, noted for kindness of
heart, and is as much admired^is her
excellent husband. Like him she is
one of the few people in this world
whose head cannot be turned by high
political or social positions and honors.
Surrounding the president were the
staff consisting of Colonel J. H, Soper,
Major George C. Potter, Major C. P.
Iankea, Captain J. W. Pratt, Captain
M. A. Kinnoy, and a number of ladies
representing the beauty and fashion of
the city, making altogether a brilliant
company. Among the distinguished
visitors were the foreign ministers and
consuls in the city. During tho after
noon Mrs. Dole, Mrs. Paul Newman,
Mrs. Lawrey, and several other ladies
received the young men of Honolulu
in Y. M. C. A. hall. Refreshments
were served froca twelve to two, and
from three to live hundred persons
were present, including the principal
business men of the city.
In the evening a concert was given
in the same building, which was at
tended by a large and appreciative
audience, and was in every way a suc
cess. The Y. M. C. A. orchestra of
twenty members rendered some excel
lent music.
On the whole, holiidaysin Honolulu,
after all, do not materially differ from
holidays in the Unitc.d States. In in
telligence, morality a^d sobriety Hono
lulu will favorably compare with any
city of its size in America.
Jo IIN R. MUSICK.
Jiucklen's Arni-ca Salve.
The Best Salve in the world for Cuts,
Bruises, Sores, Ulcers, Salt Rheum,
Fever Sores, Tetter, Chapped Hands,
Chilblains, Corns, and all Skin Erup
tions. and positively curcis Piles, or no
pay required. It is guaranteed to giv«
perfect satisfaction, or money refund
ed. Price 25 cents per box. For sale
by E. Brauch, druggist.
1'ersoimlly Conducted Kxuurfiion
California.
Electric Bitters.
Electric Bitters is a medicine suited
for any season, but perhaps more gen
erally needed, when the languid ex
hausted feeling prevails, when the
liver is torpid and sluggish and the
need of a tonic and alterative is felt.
A
prompt use of this medicine has
often averted long and perhaps fatal
bilious favers. No medicine will act
more surely in counteracting and free
ing the system from the malarial pois
on. Headache, indigestion, constipa
tion, dizziness yield to Electric Bitters.
50c. and $1 per bottle at Pioneer Drug
Store.
We write insurance for seven reli
able companies. Is vour home and
in re A
Agency.
Not to be Trilled With.
(From Cincinnati Gazette.)
Will people never learn that a "cold"
is an accident to be dreaded, and that
when it occurs treatment should b«
promptly applied? Thew is no know
ing where the trouble will end and
while complete recovery is the rule,
the exceptions are terribly frequent,
aud thousands upon thousands of fatal
illnesses occur every year ushered in
by a little injudiciovs exposure and
seemingly trifling symptoms. Beyond
this, there are today countless inva
lids who can trace their complaints to
"colds,'' which at the time of occurence
gave no concern, and were therefore
neglected.—When trouled with a cold
use Chamberlain's Cough Remedy. It
is prompt and effectual. 25 and50 cent
bottles for sale by E. Brauch. Druggist.
Ilomeseckers' Kxcurnions to the South.
On February 11 and March 10, 1806,
the North-western line will sell excur
sion tickets at very low rates to a large
number of points in Virginia, Georgia,
Alabama, North Carolina, South Caro
lina, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Indi
an Territory, Oklahoma, Texas and
Arizona. For tickets and full informa
tion apply to agents Chicago & North
western R'y.
"That Tiled Feeling"
overcomes us when inferior prepara
tions are recommended by unscrupu
lous dealers as "just as good as Foley's
Honey nnd Tar Cough Syrup,'' when
we know the unequalled merits o! this
great medicine. B. F. Yaughan.
Murdl (irus Kates.
On account of the Mardi GrasatNe\v
Orleans, La., and Mobile, Ala., the
North-Western Line will, from Febru
ary 10 to 10, inclusive, sell excursion
tickets at very low rates good for re
turn passage until March 14,1890. For
tickets and full information apply to
ticket agents Chicago &, North-West
ern R'y.
Hi
To
The North-Western Line is now
running personally conducted excur
sions to San Francisco and Los Angeles
every Thursday. The route is through
some of tho most picturesque scenery
in America, and the tourist sleeping
cars in this service are of the most
modern pattern, neatly upholstered,
and furnish their occupants every
facility and comfort. These excursions
are accompanied through to California
by experienced conductors, insuring
passengers the best of care and atten
tion. Fall information relative to
rates, etc., will be promptly furnished
on application to agents Chicago &
North-western R'y.
teiiE::/:-
IF YOU HAVE NOT
MY SPRING LINE:.
™jTcONSISTS OFj!—
A Guariuitee from tlio Manufacturers
Given with every Range Sold.
Irish and Crown Lawns,
Shot Pongee,
Black Novelty and
Novelty Dress Goods,
Gauffre Cloth,
Plaid and Maitland Serge,
American Woolenette,
Belfast Chambray,
Taffeta Moire,
Silk Tartan,
Barnaby, Toile Du Nord and
Zephyr Ginghams,
Tartan Lassie,
English and Crown Percales,
Duck Dress Goods,
Staple and Fancy
Ginghams and
Prints.
I
liaYe
also a
nice line
of
Ladies' Shirt Waists.
Ties and Belt Buckles,
also the latest in
GENT'S HATS AND SHIETS.
Also have as nice a line of
$j Ladies', Gent's, Misses', Children's
S O E S
as there is in town, at prices to correspond
with the times.
O. M. ALLEN
BEEN SWINDLED
Into paying $69 for a Steel Range, you can
can now buy one, and
SAVE $20.00
If the above Range does not prove to be as
good as any sold in the county you
can have your money back
and keep the range.
C. O. SKINNER,
Hurley, South Dakota,
A first class Meat Market where at all times may be found
Choice Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Hams, Shoulders, Potted, Dried
and Salted Meats, and everything usually kept in a well reg-ulated
market. Highest market price paid for hides and tallow, Poultry
wanted. Will pay highest price .for butcher's stock.
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T. J. HILL,
Hurley, S. D.
PROPRIETOR OF
Turner
County
Meat Market.

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