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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, September 03, 1896, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1896-09-03/ed-2/seq-1/

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REPUBLICAN TICKET.
NATIONAL.
For President—
Wm
j\1:KIXLKV,
Kor
Kor
Kor
l'or
Kor
For
For
of Ohio,
Kor Vice President—
WAKUKT A.HOIiAirr: of Xew Jersey.
STATE.
Congress—
K. .1. llAMIil,]' of Y:r.iI ton.
CUE 1. CK.VWI'OIU) of Hushes.
(lOVITIUir—
Kor
A. O. KIN^KIiUD of Union.
l.iciiUMi::nt (lovornoi
1). T. HIN]).MAN of Marshall.
Secretary of State
\v. ii. onn .i: of r.iookin^s,
TrcasiinM-—
KiUKCI. I'll 11.1.IPS of l,a\vr«'!)ft!.
Auditor—
II. K. MA VI!K\Y of Saiiljorn.
Attorney (ienci-al
Kor
Kor
S. V. .JONKS of Turner.
Superintendent, of Public Instruction
I'liANK CKAX1C of Codington.
Land Commissioner—
.J. A, 1.0C1CHAKT of Grant.
Railway Commissioner:-'—
ij. W. Mel"A 1) 1CN of ("uster.
!KOKCiU A. JOHNSON of Davison.
iN. P. liliO.MUiY ol Spink,
Preside:itial Klerfors—
.1. I,. TUKX Hit of P.on Homme.
T. 1). EDWARDS of I.awience.
1!. .1. WOODs of Minnehaha.
IJ. M. Sl.OCU.M of Caniplieli.
Business failures have been nu
merous latel}-.
Li Iiung- Chang' is now "doing-"
the United States.
The Sioux Cit}- National Bank
failed last Fridav.
Vermont went republican by
[about 40,000 majority.
Labanoff, the Russian minister
|of foreign affairs, is dead.
From all reports the sound
[money sentiment is rapidly gain
ing- ground in South Dakota.
Gen. Bragg- and Henry Watter
kon are the gold democrtic candi
llatcs for the presidential Humi
liation.
The Sioux City Journal says
Ihat it is now admitted that Bry
ln's speech at Madison Square
harden is a dead failure.
On August 31st, before the
jour of noon, $3,000,000 in g'olcl
I'as deposited in the sub-treasury
|t New York, in exchange for
ral tenders.
Senato Jones, chairman of the
imocratic national committee
|iys: "The)* (the populists) will
)ubtless do all they can to harass
|ie democracy and create confu
on, and in the end will do as in
[labama, fuse with the republi-
liis
and vote for McKinley. They
(ill go with the negroes, where
key belong-." How do you like
at talk, mine populist friend?
Ines owes one or the other an
plogy.
SIXTEEN TO ONE,
[inage Chronology Examined and
Facts Gleaned.
|VTES TO SHOW CHA^ilKS
MADE
|tlie System of the United States.
—Assertion That There is no
Country in the World TJisit
has Absolute Free Coin
age of Silver.
Iditor Repository: In the endeavoi'
Iresent the subject of coiimye intel
|bly and correctly good deal of in-
Ligation lias been rendered neces
The dates of tlie discoveries and
relation having a bearing on the
jeet will be useful to inquiring read-
Only such occurrences as have ai
led the coinage of the United Stares
comprised in the summary printed
|w. Part of these dates were o'o
3d from the United States' treasury
Irts, part from the reports of the
fctor of the United States mints,
lpart from oth sources.
1*6—Establishment of the double
lard in the United States with a
ol 1 of gold and 15.25 of silver.
fc2—Adoption of the ratio of to 15
bstablismeat of a mint with free
litre.
13—Establishment of the double
stadard in trance with a ratio of 1 to
15-4.
1804—
President Jefferson ordered
coinage of silver to cease. It was not
resumed until 1§20, when only 1,0U0
was cuiucd. During all this period,
and to some extent afterwards, no
\mericah gold or silver coins circulat
ed, for this reason: The admission of
foreign coins into this country was
couiHcuunccd. and tiiesc 'ociiig iiiieriur
in vaiue'to American coins Decame tl.e
only coin currency (The fathers who
insisted on such sound money standards
would be known as "money sharks"
ana "Shylocks" in modem Populistio
literature.)
ISlii—Abolition of the double stand
ard in Eugituid, wiiieli liad been at the
ratio of 1 to 15.21.
lbH4—Gold ratio increased by adop
tion of lti to 1 by President Jaekson
practically esiablisliing the gold stand
ard. Then the "dollar of tile daddies'
ceased to c.N ist.
lti j5—For nearly forty years follow
ing i.-KJo silver bullion was more profit
able to export than coin. It was then
under Jackson, that we went to the
single gold standard, where we have
remained until now. The dropping of
the silver dollar from the coinage in
1878 was only making legal the prao
tices ivhicli had prevailed from 1S34
until that time.
1847—Discovery of the gold mines in
California.
1851—Discovery of the gold mines in
Australia.
1873—Lowering the weight of silver
pieces of less yalue than $1 to the ex
tent of 8A per cent and limitation of
their legal tender power to So.
Maximum of gold production in Cali
fornia reaching to $65,000,000.
By the passage of the law of 1853 con
gress reduced the weight of minor
silver coins and provided that the gov
ernment should buy its bullion and
mint them. That is just, wnat the gov
ernment has been doing, only it in
cludes the. dollar with the minor coins.
Why did our government do that in
1803? To prevent greedy speculators
from buying million and coining it and
making 8 per cent profit by passing it
upon the people. Was not the govern
ment right? if so, then the republican
party is doubly right today in insisting
that the government shall buy its bul
lion and not aiiow the sellish fuine own
ers to make from 50 to 53 cents off
every silver dollar coined. This may
bo degrading silver, but any other
policy would be oppressing, robbing,
and degrading the American people.
In 1853 it cost $1.20 per ounce to pro
duce silver—by present processes il is
produced from 25 to 35 cents per 100
cents, often lower than 25 cents.
185G—Sources of silver made the sub
ject of general investigation. The
world's annual production found to be
31,-100,000 ounces. 13y 187ti this animal
production had increased to 07,753,OOU
ounces by 1880 to 93,270,000 ounces,
and by 1805 to 108,00u,000 ounces, or
more than five times that of 1350. The
commercial ratio had dtcryased during
this period from 10 to 1 down to 32 to 1.
1802—Commencement of the period
of paper, or war money, which lasted
until the end of 1878. Depreciated
paper was the only currency.
1805—Formation of "Latin Union" on
coinage, comprising Greece. Spain,
Portugal, France, Belgium, Switzer
land, Italy and Roumania on the ratio
of 154 to 1.
1870—The law suppressing the silver
dollar from the coinage was formulated
by the secretary of the treasury and in
troduced into congress. It was printed
thirteen times and was the subject of
public discussion until the passage of
tho law February 12, 1873. This was
the "crime."
1871—Gold standard adopted in Ger
muny.
Double standard adopted by .Japan.
1973—Formation of Scandinavian
Monetary Union. The gold standard
adopted by Denmark, Sweden and Nor
way also by Finland and Latin Union
several years later.
Value of divisional coins increased in
the United Statesand'eoinage of dollar
coins, except trade dollars, dropped.
1878—Law providing for purchase
and coinage of from two to four million
doll.irs worth of silver bullion per
mont.'i by the government. Free coin
age, or coinage on private account,
prohibited.
First in t.ernational monetary confer
ence in Pai'is
In the 85 years prior to 187S about 8,
000,000 silve? dollars had been coined
under free coina go- From 1878 to 1896
$471,897,729 were .coined under limited
coinage. All the silver dollar and
smaller •coins coine.1! to July 1, 1800,
amountQd to 8096,464,0^3.
All the silver dollars M? our currency
are full legal tender at 100 cents each,
except for redemption of gohl certificate
which are not legal tender.
Subsidiary silyer half dollar^., quart­
RJ_^.*J'J. J?5»
VOLUME XIV. HURLEY, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBERo, 189G.
I
er dollars and dimes are legal tender to
the amount of $10 in any one transac
tion.
1SS1—Second international monetary
conference in Paris.
18S2—Meeting of third international
monetary conference at Brussels.
Gold standard adopted by Austria.
1893—Suspension of silver coinitge in
India. Fall of silver to the ratio of 1
to 31.1:!. Repeal of the purchasing
clause of 1890.
1837, 1S57, 1873, 1893—These were the
panic years. The causes of the first
two were wild cat banking :ind inflated
bank credits, and speculations in real
estate. The panic of 1873 was caused
by excessive railroad building and ex
panded credits, and by paper money iu
llation. The panic of 1873 was caused
by shrinkage of revenues by the demo
cratic tariff, and by excessive stiver in
Ihtt.ion.
Silver has always been measured by
gold. Gold was 1 and silver was vari
able and measured by it. In 1850 the
ratio was 1 to 10: in 1880 it was 1 to*2!
in 1890 it is 1 to 32.
Today 1 ounce of gold will purchase
as much as 32 ounces of silver. If we
coined silver at 10 to 1 therefore we
would be forcing on ourselves a dollar
of a purchasing power or debtc'paying
power of only one-half the present dol
lar of our currency, all its dollars now
being kept up to a value of 100 cents
each by the existing gold standard,
Nowhere in the world at the present
time is there any freecoinage of silver,
nor has there been since the mints of
India closed 3 years ago, The few and
unimportant countries that continue, to
coin silver charge a profit on it. The
Bryan party oilers to do the work fr^e
for all the world, and would hnye no
difficulty in getting the contract on
these terms, Josiah Hartzell.
FACTS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS.
Gold Prices in the United States, Free
Silver Prices in Mexico.
I. II. 1'. Campbell, mayor of the city
of HI Aaso, Texas, hereby certify that
1 have made careful and thorough in
quiry into the wholesale price ol some
common articles of merchandise in the
city of El Paso, Tex., ani^ .the city ol
•Juarez, Mexico, just across the Hio
Grande, and at this date, August 7. 1890,
the prices of the following articles in
the two cities are as follows, those on
this side of the river being reckoned in
United States money, ami those on the
other side in Mexican money:
.Breaklast Bacon, per ib.$ 111£
11 am, per lb
Matches, per gross Hil
Pickles, in 5-tral. kegs.,. 2.25
Vinegar, in 5-gal.kegs... 5(1
Baking soda, perdoz.... 1.00
Salt, in 2-lb sacks 40
Macaroni, per lb 10
Royal bakinir powder... 4.00
Molasses, pei gallon 75
Beans, per lb 3
Cheese, per pound 12}^
Catsup, perdoz 2.50
•Jelly, per dox 2.00
Dried plums, per pound. 11
Dried apples and peaehs
per lb 11
Dried prunes, per lb.... 10
Corn starch, perdoz 1.0(5
1.00
Lemon extract., per do/...
Vanilla extract, per doz.
Arliuckle's coffee, per lb.
Soap, per box
ea, per lb 35c $
Deviled ham, per doz
Sugar, per sack, 100 lbs..
Flour, ppr sack. lOOlbs.. a.zo
Rice, per lb 5
Condensed inilk. per case 8 00
Canned tomatoes per case 2.25
Canned peas, ner case... 2.40
Crackers, per lb 7
*\i2
United
States Mexico
32
32
1.30
(i.5
l.io
2 40
9o
25
9 Ol
1.(59
17
29
0.25
5.00
25
25
20
1.90
1.90
3.00
40
5.00
20
3 75
1.00
2.90
5.50
9 ?r
0
(it 1.50
"(5.50
10.75
8 50
11H
21.50
7.90
8.50
2)
The Mexican prices are the prices
which prevail in tho Free Jone on
which there is a small duly of course
in the interior they would be much
higher. I also lind and do hereby certi
fy that Mexian labor in Mexico, in the
larger cities, is paid from (55 cents to
81.50 per day in Mexican silver. Tne
highest price for the very best and
most skilled labor is 82 per day in the
same kind of money. In the interior
of Mexico, in the country and smaller
cities, the wages are Irom 20 to 30 per
cent lower than that given above.
Giyen under my hand and seal of of
fice on the 7th day of August, A. D.
1896. R. F. Camiiheu.,
Mayor of El Paso, Texas.
up to Llutc—18!)0.
The most complete Tariff Text Book
ever published is the new edition of
'•Tariff Facts for Speakers and Stu
dents," Defender Document No 9—260
pages, just out. Publishers, The Am
erican Protective Tariff League. Cam
paign text books issued just before the
election are of little yalue. The Tariff
League is to be congratulated on its
foresight in getting out its hand book
so earlv in the year. Order bv number
only. Sent to any addres for 25 cents.
Address W. F. Wakeman, Gen. Sec.,
135 West 23d St., New York.
Truths Tci-M'ly Told.
"Foley's Honey and Tar is one of the
standard medicines used in tho Work
ing Woman's Home Association, at 21
South Peoria street, Chicago."—Dr.
Blinn, ined. sup't.
'"Foley's Uoitey and Tar gives the
best satisfaction here."— C. F. Biek
haus, Roselaiid, III.
'My customers cali for Foley's Honey
and Tar when wanting a good cough
syrup.''—.J. Ii. Kusso. Easton, O.
For gale bv B. F. Vaughan.
ICut OmoxiH and Ii ra:r.
New York Times: A German scien
tist is authority for the statement that
if women will eat onions they will rid
themselves of nervousness and beautify
their complexion at the same, time.
And as an antidote to the. pungent ob
jection which will be promptly brought
forth, lie further asserts that a sprig of
parsley dipped in vinegar and eaten
after the onions, at once removes all
evidence of their consumption.
The l.illlc (Omits Are Here
and come to stay. E. Branch, your
popular druggist, has just received a
new supply. They are the only eaur
auteed pill on the market. Be sure
you get Beggs' Little Giants. Ask for
sample.
Which is the! best government? That
which teaches self-government.—Goe
the.
J. W. EDMUNDS,
Attorney-at-Law.
Business in any part of Turner County
will receive prompt attention,
Omen in Turni'r Comity ?»aiik Itaildinj
nruu- south
Dakota.
S. GRAVES M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
('nils n'-nmptlv attemU'rt. Ottice and residPiin
mi Center Avenue.
IIUKLEY SOUTH DAKOTA.
City Barber Shop,
L. HORTOM. Piwietor,
liair GCattiny, SbaViny arjd Sham­
pooing rjeatly done
F. S. VAUGHAN,
Justice of tlie Peacc.
Is prep:ired to draw up any IckuI papers thai
may be desired. And can take ap
plications for all kinds of
policies in the
Northwestern Mutual
Life Insurance Co.
OF MILWAUKEE, WIS.
Call on liini and see what lie can do for vcu
Chas. H. Goddard,
ATTORNEY
LAW
AT
NOT A L'UKMC.
num.icy,
south
Dakota.
J. H. GALLAGHER,
Deritisst,
HURLEY, SO. DAK.
Ofilce at Residence. 2nd door north ol Photo
graph Gallery. OBlce hours from i) a. m.to lp
Turner County Bank,
(INOOIU'OKATRl))
Hurley, South Dakota
Ji, .vAXTUKI) CAPITAL, 823,000.
rl. I. Kobertson. Pres.
A. Kenrieh, jr., Vice I'ics.
\V. 11. I'obertsou, Cashier.
I. Downing, Ass't Cashier.
J^~A (iener:*l I'aiikiniiliasincss Transacted.
GET YOUR
Spring and Summer Suits
—KltOM—
-JOHNSON, THE TAILOR,
Farkcr, South Dakota.
Best of workmanship, and prices to
suit the times.
Wanted-An Idea
Who can think
of some simple
thing to patent?
Protect your Ideas they may bi
Write JOHN WEDDEHIJUKN & OL
neye, Washington, D. C., for their price offer
and list ol two hundred Invention(1,800
Protect your Ideas they may bring you wealth.
LOHN WEDDEHUTJRN & CO., Patent Attor-
WANTED.
va-t
C. J. A CI I, J'resident.
I
WE ARIi STILL SELLING
McCORMICK
Don't You
Need a Little
Flooring
A^i: tlie Old Stand.
We have the Largest Stock of Repairs of any
House in the County. Also Twine.
Lumber, Lath, Shingles,
J. EC. QUEAL
City Livery.
AND
Feed Stable.
S. W. KELLAR, Proprietor.
4
ORGANIZED 1892.
E. KUAUCU, Vice-president.
Good Rigs, with or Without Drivers.
fiU^LGY D^AY LI]Me
13. G. WARD, Pro
All Orders Promptly Attended to and Goods
Carefully Handled. ,V
U\Jj,
-.7/
-iftfiAh'i1\tw. Wiwl i|1ilVilTKtfj|
'T*S
v. r)'nS*t
-\17 7"
"V«*
M0WSi|s
ELLIOTT & BACH.
For your barn or your
granaries, corn cribs or
3louse? We have some
nice matched iloorincr
for use in your house
and granaries, and a,
lot of plank—just the
in or a
floors. Lots- of good
fencing, too. In fact
all kinds of lumber and
need anything in the lumber
money by buying it now.
No matter what, you ran get more of it for less money
right hero from us than you can anywhere else.
Don't think that because we are not in a large city
that we can't give you bargains. .We can give you
better bargains than the city fellows can because our
expenses are less. Gome over and set our bargain
counter prices.
-v^. *, ',
:F'Jr#
NUMBER 20.
CO.
8c
F. S. VAUGHAN, Agent,
BANK OF HURLEY.
PETl-JR ALLEN, Cashier.
DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
HURLEY SOUTH DAKOTA
It. W. 1'ltATT, Ass't Cashier.
4
IS•
is
-1
54#
:"4
'4$
-i-
,hj
3
building material. If you
line, you can save
1
,T1
-S
1
.'il, '"1
•W
-4
sr%
II
K'
'fsM
&
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