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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, April 19, 1900, Image 8

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1900-04-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHAPTER VII.
THS plaid suit of ci-.OTrrftkVi
Mr. Mitchel reached liis irotne that
flight to safety, bis presence on tbtr
boat having apparehtly escap^xl the
notice of any of the crooks.
ffvy"* Oil the following morning, precisely
at tbe hour appointed. Mr. Barnes was,
Announced and ushered in.
"Ah! Good morning. Mr. Barnes."
said Mr. Mitchel. "I hope you have
BOt overworked yourself on this case
yours. Peeling well this morni&g?"
"Quite well, I thank yon." was the
tejolnder, "Why do yon ask?"
"Oh, I did not know but that you had
feecr. up all night watching somebody.
Mr. Barnes, I have often admired the
patience of detectives when I have
read pf one of them sitting all night
watching a doorway through which he
had seen a criminal pass. The fact
that the criminal seldom comes out
$galn docs not seem to deter him at all.
He watches on and hopes for the best.
Some day a criminal may come back
and be caught Who knows? That
«ort of thing always makes me think of
Sour cat. Heinus Is his name, and he is
truly a wonderful fellow in many
trays, only he has that inevitable fail
ing of his kind—he must watch some
thing. I suppose he 1'eels it a »ort of
fluty In repayment for hia food aud
lodging. The first night on which he
^,jsame to us he-caught a mouse, and
-Willie he was playing with it the little
creature escaped aud ran into my
wife's slipper, froiu whieh hiding place
Master Uethus soon dislodged him. But
do you know Whenever that cnt sees
that slipper lying about he sits down
and watches' t! It Is really very amus
ing, Come Up spine nlyrli when my
Wfe Is at home, and I will have Remus
go through is performance for you. 11
,mlght urovi*,a useful obiect lesson.'
?'I bavtv' Usttmed patiently to your
phatSng. Mr. Mltchol." said Jir. Barnes.
With becoming dignity, "«n"d I should'
be pleased to have you Ml tm* why you
have flpol.el) thus What Ime I done
Jo deserve V" y,
SS'SS "You bad nit' spied upou." answeredt
G&to. iljtehel sharply
jJxv "You are
ml.itfikPti
THE CHIME OF THE CENTURY
o^v'' .--v..••.'• ,?•:,•
BY RODRIGUES OTTOLENGU1,
Author of "An Artist In Crime," "A Conflict of Evidence," "A
Modern "Wizard." "Pinal Proof," 3Jtc.
Modem "Wizard," '^ginaj_Proof,» Etc.
Copyrighti iSoc, b\t Q. P. Putnam'* Sum. All rtghin reserved,
OOOOOOO-OOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
said Mr Barnes
••Quietly....
"l)o yb» me-ftn "tfi deny that one of
our men followed me about yester
'4#jaayr
\^j£ ^sr0. b% it was joot. at my
fJns,tjga-
^'liieiJ'Iy was'lVfbffer^
"He knew yon, rind, seeing you in th*
mpany of one of the shrewdest bun
then trLtown, lie thought it,best to
ecp you both In sight."
fr" 4a
&'.v 8n:-y
•BSJL UL.Uof capable or jment and.
then mutflered old Mr. Mora
T^iat^jiir ro New York cltyi
^©"wnri^tnSFpnsff then. But now
we why yfa ins^raonaL
fffito-Wsfltt.TOUvktmw thai I did}1
^£2fll "That is not answering my
tlon."
5ij ."Wellt Mitchel while I cg&airil?
ui 1:1 lirujf^enTre
Lwjjitself. ftQSi
SS^WATWL NJIAII
_J JU-
'sai^srpaqy SlTpgSF^"S«ain 06 Ifiisf "night's e-s
nv Xoi fla\Ing "rfiu" same' eonfl
denee in that pe ^oii which you ueenKHl
to have, 1 thought that as you£,frlt ud
rayMuj|LXKJ^rtr hand ftf ease
SL"?¥-^^of trouble. Bwt'l ^vas not spying cuisn
3S
(JUt'S-
yuii ~s» far as fo «lis-
T-^/i igulse yourself as a waiter ahd ^erre
'"vfif
''beer to a lot of crooks, just to be msir
me? I am truly Indebted to you. But
I do not admire this masjuet'nt1lng. It
is too tneatrical. It giavors too much
of tbe dimo novel detective, Ahd.I
suppose, of course, you had to bribe
one of the regular waifers, who al
lowed you to take his place, eh?"
"Not exactly," said Mr. Bnrnea
hesitatingly, somewhat abashed by the
t^crltlolsia upon his methods "but. Mr.
1* WMitebel, we cannot always choose, I
have known of the uses to which this
boat has been put all summer, and I
^i^^|realiaed that ,It would be wise and
l^^^mlght become qt extreme importance
5- to me to have It in my power .to be
00
board at any tlnlo. I therefore ar
$jran£ed matters with the headJwalter
£§MMt'.bave played waiter on th^t tt&at so
Ife^raMteB that now my prosence..tfttfttqts.
the conceit cbmnroh to
of your profession. Your disguises
never peijetratwl. You arc like the]
r^RrgS^ftrtrlch with 'tils bead in the sand,- hi-'
IrtribWft' your own mln(t».. Now, -the
T^^iStiict^ Is your Identity was very' well
^^^rSl^l^^'iknown on the boat last night."
*'J? ^i "Indeed! How do you know that?"
~s «The Iccttirer of the evening was
ih?
talking to me about you. He eonsjilera
witb&:.-.ej®ver, -.but- expressed Jifs
'sorprlse that you Bbould stoop to such
$ ^t^^juitiquated methods as the employment
^'t SPtea* He says that If ho were in
sSs^our, place lie would use his brainy ln
«Cj
&$*•>!%{-
iWi
s^swgrlly, for be bad begun to lose pa-,
jje thought, that Mr. Mitchel
l^.'.went too .fariii bis adverse criticisms,
ad in this- pertiajpa be was rigb*. But
tie troth was Mr. Mitchel' was. ex
?j|gj$e»i»lvely annoyed, not-io much because
fpgr bad .followed bltb, but because
lie
IliflfiWritfwftffiimW
He had therefor© given vent to his feel
ings by resorting to satire.
Mr. Mitchel had decided that Preach
er Jim was possessed of quite a supe
rior quality of brains, and consequent
ly he was attracted by Mr. Barnes'
words, well knowing that they were
not Idly spoken.
"What do you mean by that?" said
be.
'"The man Is a monomaniac," Mr.
Barnes replied.
"On what subject?"
"Oh, on the subject of last night's
lecture! I know his history very well,
having observed him for many years.
One of his delusions is that lie is him
self a great criminal. If you could get
him to talk with you, he would un
doubtedly lead you to suppose that he
has committed many crimes and that
through his marvelous skill he has not
only escaped arrest, but has even
avoided suspicion."
"But is not this true?"
"True as to his keeping out of the
clutches of the law, but that has not
required any skill. He has committed
no crimes since he left the reforma
tory, and he entered that place when a
child. Uhe man is not sound here," con
cluded Mr. Barnes, tapping hisi fore
head significantly.
"He does not impress me as being un
sound mentally," said Mr. ,Mitehel
doubtlBfily. ,v
"Very likely not at a single inter
view. Perhaps Indeed you may even
have concluded that he Is endowed
with unusual intelligence. But sup
pose that you Were to meet him again
and that his conversation should be
substantially the same and that at
maoy subsequent interviews with you
he should always descant upon the
same topics in much the same words!
Such has been my experience, and 1
am satisfied that his apparent brillian
cy Is really lusterless. As ..L said at
first, he is a monomaniac."
"Nevertheless, Mr. Barnes, he has
proved the fallacy of one of your fa
vorite theories with scarcely an effort
of his feeble brain."
"What theory?"
"You argued that the theft of the
will Is good evidence against young
Mora that the will would be useful to
him, because Its suppression would
double his fortune,"
"I did, and my opinion remains un
altered."
"Very good. But let me give you
Preacher .Tim's idea—the idea, let us
•ay, of a practical crook opposed to
the theory of a skillful detective. That
sbould be interesting, should it not?
Well, then, suppose that any man
that is, any man except the son—knew
of t£iig tvili and first -stole the docu-
to make it operative. .Now, after jails
Affair blows oyer and, young Mora is
in possession of the property, luclud*
tag Bine milUim* bequeathed else
where, could not tbe possessor of the
Will draw interest, as It were, upon the
capital by presenting this Important
paper, say quarterly. In substantiation
-sf uir cinimi
"So that ii Preacher Jim's theory, is
It?---- .Well, it- is^prsciBely -the son: of
thing that a crazy man would work
out, but which no sane man would
either formulate or carry into effect.
But, considering it for a moment as
among the possibilities, it is easily de
molished. No theory is of value which is
not substantiated Ijy collateral.circum
stances. Now. .there are no facts to fit
the supposition, of a murderer from
without, while the chain of evidence
which encircles tbe son is almost com
plete. But, since you have been dis
cussing this case with Preacher Jim,
perha.ps you spoke to him1 about the
plaid suit of clothes. What are his
views in that direction?''
"There he agrees with you—that is
to sayf he believes that the murderer
wore them going in, as well as coming
out, and that young Mora's sugges
tion that they were taken from his
room to cover the blood stained clothes
of the intruder is untenable."
"Thus, you see, he advances contra-'
dlctory theories which substantiate
mine as to his Insanity. At one mo
ment he thinks an outsider. came in
and killed the old man to get the will
and use it against the son, and in the
next breath he argues that the mur
derer wore the piaid suit, in which
case the son must be the guilty party.
So, you' see, Mr. Mitchel, I fear you
wasted your evening—that is if you
went aboard that boat with any idea
of probing this mystery." --ij
"Which, of course, I did not.1' inter-*
rupted Mr. Mitchel.
"Well, anyway I have to report that
I did n^t waste my day. What would
you say, Mr. Mitchel, were 1 to tell
you that I have found that plaid suit
and that it Js at present in m.y posses
sion
"I should say that you are a very
clever man unless"—
"Uhl^s what?"^ft?'',y'
"Unless some oM' fo'Unii 'tlie, things
and brought them to you. That was a
possibility prophesied by Preacher
Jim."
"Oh, indeed! But be probably meant
the regular, police. I do not have im
portant clews andevidence thrust
upon tne lti that manner. No 1 dis
.^overed these things by the system
'•Wblch you deprecate—by spying."
yCi"
me the details.'^-/
"I am to uhderstand, then, that you
will work with me on tbe case? Yon
asked for 24 hours in which, to con
sider the matter, but you bave not
given me your decision. Yoy have
spent the last half hour chaffing me,"
"Oh, I meant no offense! Surely
you have taken none. There's my
hand.. Yes, I will study out this
problem with you, but I stipulate for
perfect liberty to proceed as I please."
"Very good. Then I will relate what
has happened since we parted. You
speak speeringly of spies and make a
plea for the use of brains aloue. But
It is only in fiction that a detective
listens to the story of a crime and
finds the solution without visiting the
locality in which It was committed
or seeipg the suspected parties. In
practical experience the analytical
work goes hand in hand with'what
you cal} the spy system.. If suspicious
circumstances point to a certain man,
we watch his movements, and often we
very soon discover that he is Innocent or
guilty, especially when we can spy upon
him before be knows that he is sus
pected. With that knowledge, of
course, the criminal uses more caution.
To my mind, it was almost a certainty
that young Mora killed his father. I
argued that he was unaware of the
fact that he had been observed by the
watchman until he beard it on the fol
lowing day. I-Ie had changed his cloth
ing because of the blood spattered up
on lilm, and to offset the watchman's
testimony he denied his first visit to
the house."
"I follow you. Proceed."
"Think a moment. If a man can
make a change of clothing away from
his own home In the middle of the
night, reappearing in garments which
fire not new und- wjjlcb ho-is -known to
have worn before, the logical deduction
Is that he must have another residence
In which he is sufficiently at home to
keep a part of his wardrobe there."h
"Yes yw are- rigbt. fio on."
"Having removed his blood stained
garments and having replaced them
With a fresh suit, he would hurry homo
to be the one to discover and report
the crime, but when he then learns
that bo had been seen In a suit con
spicuous because of its pattern ho
would naturally become anxious about
"He imrricd to the river, where he tossed
the kunHlc overboard
that suit. Fearing that it might bp
found in that closet at his other house,
where he haa hurriedly left it, he
would take the first opportunity to re
move it. Since I ho murder you ug Mora
bad been heid to await the result of the
Inquest.. Yesterday he was released,
the'district attorney evidently-consid
ering that' teJje. the .wisest course/jintlt
'we'rau -6b'tainbV^^
sent tp the grand -jm-y. Yesterday,
trinity to go after the clothes.^There
Core I, watche(] him. I knew that he
would be cautions, and so I was com-,
pelled to use the double spy system. I
ordered another man to follow him,
which he did until, by doubling 011 his
tracks, always in itself a suspicious
circumstance, young Mora had suc
ceeded in discovering that lie was be
ing foUoiyed, whereupon my'man de
sisted. After, that I had no difficulty
in continuing the chase, for, having
rid himself of a spy, he was .no longer
suspicious. I may say, In passing, that
just after this niy man met you with
Slippery Sam near Apollo hall, for we
were in that neighborhood. .Mora .went
straight to a house, which he entered,
using a night key. Half an hour later
he came put again with a bundle. This
time he looked about for spies but,
seeing no one whom bp mistrusted, he
hurried by the nearest way to.the,riv
er, where he tossed the bundle over
board. You see, It was no part of his
intention to destroy tiie clothes. In
deed I have uo doubt that lie hopes
that they will be found, whereupon lie
will claim that the iissassin has thrown,
them into tl?e river. But, unfortunate
ly, such a claim will not be only use
less, but it will now. injure his Cause,
for I have some Ideas about these gar
ments which prgxa. puzaling tp
him." rr~ -1
"I would like to hear' them."
"We will come to that better, 1 think,
when we meet Mr. Mora face to face."
"And when will that be?"
•J "I have taken the liberty to write
him a letter asking him to-cal! bore on
business of vital importance."
"And do you think .that he will
come?"
"Yes. He is playing a bold game. It
is time he were'here now, because I
asked him to be with us by 10, and it
is now half past. Therefore let me con
clude. .After recovering the bundle*:
which of course did very promptly,
I returned to the house, and there 1
discovered a pretty, little woriiau who
calls herself Mrs. Morton. Moreover., I
am convinced that- Morton and Mora
are one and .the same."
"Yon mean to .say that he is secretty
fc*rriei4 nHd^r^ftssutoedaaflie?''
(To be Contioyed:)
Sr
Things That Have Come Trtie
Who would have predicted, jn
October, 1896, when paralysis ex
tended to every industry, that in
the brief period that has elapsed
since that date-the representee
of a Democratic paper like the
Cleveland "Plain-Dealer" would
say that "our labor is fully em
ployed and our people are con
tented?'' Four years ag-o, when
the wail of calamity came from
Kansas that its farmers were
hopelessly burdened with mort
gages, who would have dreamed
that four years later the editor of
a silver paper would be able to
declare in New York, that
liits
Pi ty^T
v^iiy iv
Mbus:'
iness conditions were never so ex
cellent in Kansas as to-day," and
that
farmers have practically
all paid off the mortgages on
their farms and most of them
have money to lend?" There has
never been so marvelons a chang'e
in the history of this or any other
country as has taken place dur
ing the four years. It may be
added that if Bryan politicians
fail to take into account the effect
of these conditions upon the elec
tions next November they are re
serving a painful surprise for
themselves. General prosperity
is vastly njore potential factor in'
pending campaign than any ques
tion affecting the status of the
Phillipities.—Indianapolis "Jour
nal."
Growing Volume of Money.
The per capita man oua ht to be hap*
py. For each person in the United
Stales the amount of n-.oney in circu
lation is $2(i.l2. In 1896 the figure was
$21.53. "An increase of over 20 per
cent in the per capita withii) four
years, making due allowance for
inr
oreased population, should satisfy any
one except a Populist who wants paper
money to trundle around by the wagon
1 .-1—•
!-.„« &•> ooa.nra 1
nan
1UUU 1U*M Vllivll 'IKI'/V^vv^jvvv wi
eyare aow circulating in this country,
the increase in four years reaching
$41)2,000,000. All these dollars an re
cognized through the world as equiva
lent to gold, Four years ago the gold
eireulfttiftu- in t.hp United States was
$489,000,000. Now it is £785.000,000,
an increase of 00 per cent. Has silver
fallen back? Not a bit of it. The
amount of silver and silver certificates
in circulation has increased in four
years from $558,000,000 to §631,000,000.
For the first, time the money in circu
lation has passed the $2\000,000,000
AND
A- 0. WELCH, Proprietor.
1
^Good.Rig^with or Without Drivers.
WSKi
mftik, and every dollar is worth 100p
Here is a Iieijublicai) triumph of
great magnitude, so laree, jn ifaot, that
the Jjemocratie papers never refer to
it. They advocated free coinage as
the only road to an increased volume
of money. But in less than fopr years
after the Chicago platfrom was offered
as the true system of finance the cir
culation has increased by nearly $500,
000,000. The paramount Democratic
issue in 1896 was, as events have dem
onstrated, a huge blunder, an absolute
reversal of everything that could in
sure the prosperity of the coqntry. It
takes nerve in the presidential candi
date ""ho led that cause to come for
ward again and offer his views on pub
lic questions as worthy of confidence.
Sound judgment in a leader is essential.
If he has been identified with a radical
error, one proved beyond question, he
can not be trusted to point the way in
other issues. What Bryan declared
was the worst financial policy is unmis
takably tbe best.—Chicago Inter Ocean
:l
Caught, a Ur-.-idful Colli.
Marion Kooke, manager for T. M.
Thompson, a large importer of line
millinery at 1628 Milwaukee Avenue,
Chicago, says: "During the late se
vere weather I caught a dreadful
cold which kept me awake at night
and made me unfit to attend my
work during the day. One of my
milliners was taking Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy for a severe cold at
that time, which seemed to relieve
her so quickly that I bought some
for myself. It acted like magic and
I began to improve at once. I am
now entirely well and feel very
pleased to acknowledge its merit,'-,"
For sale by E. Brauch's Drugstore.
The faithful camq clerk is like the
famous artist or poet. He isn't appre
ciated u.ntill after his retirement.'
Don't think you are the only wise
man in the lodge. Every other
member thinks the same thing. Be
original.
mm
Caveats,
and Trftdc-Mwksobtained, and all Pat-j
ient business conducted for MODERATE FEES.
JOUR OFFICE IS
Opposite
tion. We advise,
5 A
U.S. PATENT OFFICE
5 and we can secure patent in KM time than those}
S remote from Washington.
Send model,
drawing or photo.,
with descrip­
if patentable or
3 charge. Our fee
PAMPHLET,
cost of same in the
not, free of
not one
till
patent is secured. I
"How to
Obtain Patents," with
U.S.
1 sent free. Address,
This farmer bought cheap
:v fencing, We keep a full line
g°od fencing, both in boards
and wir^.
We also keep a fnil line oi
all kinds of lumber, audit goes
at the cheapest jjrices.
If you want carpet-lining yon
will find it here, also 1 ime,
brick, window screen fixtures,
cement, plastering hair, win
dows and blinds.., in fact, if
you do not see what you want
iri our line, ask lor it, and we will either produce it or get
it here in a short time,
Come iu and see our stock it will cost you nothing.
JYS. VAUGHAN, Ag'tl
PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS
Every Thursday from points in
MINNESOTA SOUTH DAKOTA
Daily excursions enable passengers to talse advantage of through fire'-class
and Tourist Sleeping Cars at Council lilults and Omaha to points in California
and Oregon, which run every day in the year.
LOWEST RATES
^HORTESTTIME ON THE ROAD
FINEST SCENERY
lou can leave home any.
day in tne week and travel oh: fastest trains all
the way and haye advantage of above through car arrangements. -For pam
phlets and information inquire of nearest agent.
& R'u
Republican State Convention.
To the Republican fetors of th
State of South Dakotaf There will be
a delegate oonye,ntiori of the Republi
cans of the state of South Dakota, held
in the city of Sioux Ffllls, on Wednes
day, the 23rd day of May, A- D., 1900,
at 2 o'clock pf rq., for the purpose of
electing eight delegates to the Repub
lican national convention, to be held
in the city of Philadelphia June 19, A.
I),? 1900, and for the further purpose of
placing in nomination two candidates
for congress, a candidate for governor,
lieutenant governor, sebretary of atate,
state treasurer, state auditor, superin
tendent of public instruction, conjmis
ioner of school and public lands, attor
ney general, railroad commissioner,
four candidates for Presidential elect
ors, and also for recommending a nat
ional committeeman, and for the trans
action of such other business as may
properly come before a Republican
state convention. All voters of the
state believing in Republican princi?
pies, and who endorse the policy of the
Republican party, are invited to unite
under this call for the selection of del
egates to said convention. The state
committee bas recommended that no
proxiesbe allowed in the state conven
tion, and that the delegates and alter?
nates present cast the full vote for
each county. The ratio of representa
tion wiil be as follows: Two delegates
at large from each county, and one ad
ditional delegate for each forty votes
or major fraction thereof cast for Hon.
Kirk G. Phillips, Republican candi
date for governor, at the election of
1898. The representation to which
tbe several counties will be entitled to
under this cali is as follows:
Votes cast No. of
in 1S9S. delegates
Aurora
Beadle.. 932
Bon Homme 923
Brookings. 954
Brown
Brule...'
Buffalo,..
Butte
Campbell *.
Charles Mix........
Clark
Clay
Codington v.
Custer
Davison
Day....
Deuel
Douglas..,
Edmundsj
Pall
1662
479
(50
290
80
(147
tiob
982
813
Rive
1
and foreign countries
C.A.SNOW&CO.
OPP. PATENT OFFICE, WASHINQTON, D. C.
Faulk
Grant.,
Hamlin
Hand
Hanson .........
Hughes ,,.
in so
5yde ,. ....
•Jeraulci
Kingsbiii.y.
Lake ..... .... ,. ....
Lawrence ,,
Lincoln
Lyman.......
$
Marshall
McCq«k. ..
McPherson. 77....,... •.
Meade
Miner
Minnehaha
Moody .-.
Pennington,
Potter.. /.
Roberts.. ....
Sanborn.
Spink
stanleyj.,. -.
Sully
Turner C.
Union
Walworth..
Yankton....... ......
Unorganized counties
to to
Delano and Scohy. ,.,
Gregory..
.TacksOn, Nowlin and
FRASK CRANE, Secretary.
Ft
We
trad
and
on
bf tl
tion
delu
on
thos
It
bun
per
ml
in
mat
j?aP
feilv
is
Kir
g".re
714
sue
a.P
Kit
ag£
bot
but
I
11
27
tio:
ens
the
iia1
the
fele
am
Th
%it
to
•25
2(5
44
14
"V
9
17
18
18
27
22
TO
I
11
(2!
.878
500:
484
is
2t
Tl
fre
th
pr'
of
an
by
ad
su
ed
pa
14
1.5
HI
420
471
838
56S
4S8
348
437
12
14
23
10
14
.11
13
29
'"ft'"
1094
209
287
844
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Presho
Ziebach
30
05
Dated, February 24, 1P00.
By order of the state commit,tee,
CHARLES N HERREID,
Bismarck's Iron Nerve
Was the result of bisfeplendi/l health
Indomitubte will,and tremendous eneK
gy are not found where stomach, liver,
kidney and bowcle are out of order.
If you want these qualities and the
success they bring, use Dr. King's
New Life Pills, They develop every
power of brain and body. Only 25 cts
E. Brauch's drug'store 2
'A Tentimonlal from Old Knglautl.
"I consider Chamberlain,s Cough
•Remedy thfc best in the world for
bronchitis," says Mr. William Sa
vory, ol Warrington, Engiand. "It
'has saved my wife's life, she having
'been a martyr to bronchitis for over
|ix years, being most of the time con
fined to htr bed. She is now .quite
well.,, Sold by E. Brauch's Drug
ft#,
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Chairman,
1
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