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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, October 13, 1904, Image 9

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1904-10-13/ed-1/seq-9/

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SERVICESTOR
PAYNE SIMPLE
I
OFFICIAL WA8HINGTON TURNS
OUT TO PAY LAST TRIBUTE
OF RESPECT. Vf
.£.*»£• 5"
PRESIDENT AND WIFE ATTEND
.. ?f
CEREMONIES AT
MARKBD BY
SIMPLICITY.,,
CHURCH ARE
IMPRESSIVE
.JOT
GUARDED BY POSTAL CARRIERS
SPECIAL TRAIN CARRIES RE
MAINS TO FORMER HOME IN
-.-MILWAUKEE.
fd?
5
.... Washington, Oct 9. Although an
official funeral, the services in St.
'John's church yesterday over the
body of the late Henry C. Payne,
postmaster general, were marked by
impressive simplicity. Official Wash
ington filled the nave of the church,
and brillians as were the uniforms of
the large representation from the
army, navy and marine corps, the
solemnity of the scene was only en
hanced by the sharp contrast of color
with the deep mourning of the family
and personal friends of the dead
cabinet officer.
Side by side with Mrs. Payne sat
President and Mrs. Roosevelt, both in
deep mourning. In half an hour
The Funeral Procession
was winding its way slowly down
Pennsylvania avenue, escorted by the
postal carriers of the city of Wash
ington in uniform, to* the Pennsyl
vania station.
The special train carrying the body
and the funeral party left the station
at 3:35 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
Secretary Hitchcock, who had expect
ed to go to Milwaukee on the train,
was unable to do so and telephoned
the fact with his regrets early in the
afternoon. Secretary of Agriculture
Wilson is the only cabinet officer who
went with the train, but the plans
contemplate that Secretary Shaw and
Secretary Metcalf will join the funer
al party later.
Fragrant With Flowers.
The chancel was fragrant with flow
I ers sent by friends from all over the
country. The only flowers on the cas
ket were those of Mrs. Payne, a large
sheaf of Easter lilies, a wreath of
I white roses and carnations from the
[president and Mrs. McKinley, and a
I cluster of violets, gardenias and
[palms the offering of Miss Jones.
After the funeral party had left the
[church the congregation remained
I standing until the president and Mrs.
I Roosevelt had entered their carriage.
|Mrs. Payne and the relatives of the
postmaster general were driven to
I their hotel, .where they remained until
I train time.
PLAN $100,000 HANNA TOMB.?
|8ons of Late Senator Will Trect Great
Mausoleum.
Worcester, Mass., Oct. 9.—The sons
I of the late Senator Marcus A. Hanna
I are to erect a $100,000 mausoleum on
the family lot in Lakeview cemetery,
Cleveland, to contain eighteen cata
I combs for members pf the Hanna
Ifamily. In the center, will lie two
lmammoth sarcophagi of pure Nor
Iwegian marble. One will contain the
Ibody of Senator Hanna, the other will
Ibe the final resting place of Mrs.
•Hanna.
PLOTS DEATH OF FAMILY.'
|Man Cuts Wife and Son With Axe and
Kills Himself.
Youngstown, Ohio, Oct. 9.—In an at
tempt to wipe out his entire family
yesterday John Dolowich, a Slav aged
|forty five years, hacked his wife with
land axe and cut his son with the
Isame weapon in attempting to kill
|his children, and finished the bloody
Iwork by sticking a bread knife into
Ihis throat, dying instantly. The man
Iwas crazed with drink and fought
Iwith his wife over domestic affairs.
|The woman is probably fatally in
lured. 7J""
ICARRIE NATION AGAIN IN JAIL.
|l8 Released on One Charge and Starts
On a Rampage.
Wichita, Kan., Oct. 9.—Mrs. Nation
and. Mrs. McHenry immediately after
laving been released from jail on an
|appeal bond yesterday afternoon,
pent down the street knocking cigars
jut of the mouths of men they met.
They have again been arrested and
a.re in the city jail on the charge of
listurbjng the city peace and ob
structing the sidewalk. Amass meet
ling has been called for Sunday to start
prohibition crusade.
'V--,
SPLIT TICKET FILED.
lelnze Wing Supports G. O. P. Elec
tors and Democratic State Ticket.
Helena, Mont., Oct. 9.—The nomina
tions of the Republican wing of
leinze's anti-trust party have been
lied with Secretary of State Hays.
This wing of the anti-trust movement
las split its ticket. It names th« Re
publican presidential electors and
Ixon, the Republican candidate for
angress, and then inserts the Demo
itic state ticket-
W
.j.
NEBRASKA 18 LAUNCHED.
Heaviest Vessel Ever Launched in
United States Navy.
Seattle, Wash., Oct. 9.—Yesterday
at 2 o'clock, fifteen minutes before the
scheduled time, the battleship Ne
braska left her ways at Moran Bros.'
shipyard in this city and slid grace
fully and majestically into the waters
of Puget sound. The launching was
entirely successful and no hitch
marred the proceedings. The only
reason the ship was launched ahead
of time was that by a slight miscalcu
lation the poppet (a wooden brace at
the bow) was raising the vessel too
high, and in the opinion of experts, it
was better that the supports be
knocked out without delay. Fully 50,
000 people viewed the ceremonies and
saw the big vessel slip into tfife water.
She created a verysmall wave as she
took her maiden plunge and floated
out gently and gracefully. Naval
men who viewed the launching stated
that it was the most successful they
ever saw. The Nebraska weighs
more than any vessel ever before
launched by the United States navy.
Miss Mary Ann Mickey, daughter of
Gov. Mickey of Nebraska, christened
the vespel. ...
•A ir*r
NEGRO KILLS WHITE MAN.
Woman, Pursued by Would-Be Lover,
Seeks Protection of Colored Man.
Memphis, Tenn., Oct 9. Rowland
C. Hill, an insurance agent, was shot
and instantly killed by Ben Gillam, a
negro, early yesterday. The latter
immediately surrendered to the police.
Hill, it is alleged, had persistently
forced his attentions upon Mrs. Emma
Leonard, who keeps a grocery store.
The woman, in order to avoid Hill,
left the store and sought refuge in
Gil'am's yard. Hill entered the yard,
it 13 said, with the avowed intention
of taking Mrs. Leonard back to her
store. The negro secured a shotgun
and killed Hill.
Shrine at Aberdeen.
Aberdeen, S. D., Oct. 9. Yelduz
Temple of the Mystic Shrine was in
stalled last night in Aberdeen, the cer
emonies being brought to a close by
an all-night banquet. The Shriners
from Fargo, more than one hundred
of them, had charge of the installa
tion of the new shrine. Shriners from
St. Paul, Sioux City, Sioux Falls and
other cities assisted in the installa
tion. More than 700 shriners were
in the city.
Boston, Oct. 9. The Republican
Gov. Bates Renominated.
state convention yesterday nominated
a state ticket headed by Gov. John I
Bates and sixteen presidential elec
tors and adopted a platform, the main
planks of which indorse President
Roosevelt's administration, and advo
cate reciprocity treaties with foreign
countries, and especially with Canada.
Money for Cornell.
Ithaca, N. Y., Oct. 9. The will of
Daniel Willard Fiske, who died at
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, Sept.
17, bequeaths to Cornell university, an
aggregate of half a million d9llars.
Application for admission of the will
to probate was made here yesterday,
Douglas for Governor.
Boston, Oct. 9.—The Massachusetts
Democratic state convention held yes
terday was one of the most harmoni
ous in the party's history. The entire
state ticket, headed by William L.
Douglas, a manufacturer of Brokton,
was nominated by acclamation.
Murder Charge Dismissed.
Annandale, Minn., Oct. 9.—The ex
amination of Joseph Knitle iand Ole
Larson resulted in their clearance of
any complicity in Henry Fashant'3
death, which occurred Sept. 10. The
court decided that Fashant met his
death by being hit by a train.
Golden Wedding Celebrated.
Elk River, Minn., Oct. 9.—Mr. and
Mrs. E. P. Mills have just celebrated
their golden wedding anniversary.
They have been residents of this vil
lage since 1868. Three sons, one
daughter and sixteen grandchildren
comprise the family.
Bartholdi Laid to Rest.
Paris, Oct. 9.—The funeral of Bar
tholdi took place yesterday and was
a most Imposing ceremony. It was
attended by hundreds of mourners, in
cluding public officials, students and
models. The American embassy was
represented.
O'Brien Gets Decision.
Milwaukee, Wis., Oct. 9.—Philadel
phia Jack O'Brien was awarded the
decision over Tommy Burns (Noah
Brusso) of Chicago In a six-round
bout before the Badger Athletic club
last night. The fighting was some
what tame.
Noted Crook Jailed.
Buffalo, Oct. 9.—Ned Lyons, one of
the most notorious crooks, is locked
up here. He is said to have success
fully robbed banks for sums aggre
gating $10,000,000. He confessed and
offered detectives $1,500 to release
him. '.T:
Not Guilty of Lynching.
Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 9.—The jury
in the case of the state vs. Ike Cobb
and three others charged with the
lynching of Allen Small, colored, sev
eral months ago, has returned a ver
dict of not guilty. &
|IISk' Pour Lives Lost. 'fj
St. Joseph, Oct. 9.—The Tracy hotel
tn South St. Joseph burned, four per
sons losing their lives. A boy is fatal
ly burned and a cattle buyer was bad
ly hurt by jumping from a third-story
•m,.
SIX MEN ARE
SUffOCAIED
GRAND TRUNK TRAINMEN LOSE
CLAIR
THEIR LIVES IN ST.
TUNNEL.
iiispin
TRAIN BREAKS IN
OF
life
ENGINEER DIES HERO'S DEATH
1
The train, which entered from the
American side of the tunnel, was
made up of seventeen coal cars. When
it broke Engineer Coleman realized
that the
Accident Had Happened,
and with the three cars that were still
attached to the engine, steamed out of
the tunnel into the Sarnia yards. He
hastily detached his engine and went
back into the tube for the stalled
cars. When his engine reached them
he attempted to push them back
through the tunnel and out to the
American port. The grade proved too
steep, and the attempt was a failure.
The engine and cars rolled back into
the gas-laden tunnel and Engineer
Coleman was suffocated at his post.
His fireman, Fred Forrest, stepped
into the partly filled water tank of the
engine, where there was enough air to
preserve his life, although he is in a
serious condition.
INSPECTION OF VESSELS IS LAX.
Commission to Investigate Slocum
Disaster Ready to Report.
Washington, Oct. 11.—The commis
sion appointed to investigate the Slo
cum disaster will probably submit its
report to the president to-day. Some
new legislation will be recommended,
but the report will show nothing sen
sational.
The steamboat inspectors' service
will be defended as a whole, but sug
gestions having for their purpose the
strengthening of that service, will be
made. The local inspectors in charge
in New York will he criticised and
held in some measure responsible for
the reprehensible condition of the Slo
cum and the want of proper instruc
tions when new inspectors are put to
work will be inveighed against as an
evidence of laxity in the service that
should be condemned.
Recommendations will be made for
a more frequent and more rigid in
spection of steamboats.
Commission's Findings.
Several hundred pages of testimony
were taken by the commission. In its
report the commission finds:
That the ship was not properly in
spected and that no effort was made
by the inspector, upon whose report
her certificate was issued, to test the
appliances supposed to be used for
the protection of life.
That the life preservers were not
taken from the supports and tested as
they should have been that they
were filled with .granulated cork in
stead of cork blocks, and covered
with rotten canvass, which permitted
them to become waterlogged the mo
ment they struck the water.
That the hose on board the Slocum
had never been given a pumping test
by the officials. ....
Untrained Crew.
That when the alarm of fire was
sounded, the hose was ptilled from its
supports and permitted to lie on the
deck in a coil, where, owing to its
long disuse, it burst and became use
less.
That the pressure from the pumps
was inadequate for fire purposes.
That there had never been any fire
drills on board the boat that the of
ficers did not know how to command
the crew under such circumstances,
and that they knew nothing of their
duties under such conditions.
That the protections required by
law in such parts of the vessel as
might be exposed to fire had not been
complied with by the owners.
8hou!d Have Beached Her. Iv
One of the strong points of criticism
is the conduct of the officer of the
Slocum in running his vessel so far up
the river before beaching her. The
report calls attention to the very in
adequate fire protection, the quickly
collapsing wooden deck superstruc
ture, which was destroyed before the
ship was beached, and insists that
these things should have compelled
the captain of the Slocum to run his
boat aground at the first possible mo
ment instead of permitting his passen
gers to burn to death while making
his race to North Brother island.
WJt:
r:€-
ii
OVERCOME BY COAL GAS
fSP'i »%V*
TWO
AND PART
IS
TUNNEL.
STALLED IN
4
l,s 1/.', .J
RETURNS WITH ENGINE TO RES
CUE COMRADES AND LOSES
HIS LIFE
if%
Port Huron, Mich., Oct. 11.—Six env
ployes of the Grand Trunk railway
were suffocated to death by coal gas
early yesterday in the St. Clair tun
nel, which runs under the St. Clair
river from Port Huron to Sarnia, Ont.
A coal train broke in two while pass
ing through the tunnel and three of
the train crew were suffocated while
part of the train lay stalled in the
tunnel. The engineer lost his li'
wJien he returned and endeavored
push the stalled cars back to safety,
and two other rescuers perished in
vain attempts to penetrate the gas
eous atmosphere cf the great tube.
His Was a Trunk Line.
Baggagemen keep on hand a quan
tity of rope, and for re-roping a trunk
which has become dislocated in transit
accept a fee of 25 cents.
Charles Stilmlan, son of a New York
millionaire and himself worth mil
lions, In order to become familiar with
traffic methods, is working as a bag
gageman for the Southern Pacific rail
road in San Francisco. While engaged
in re-roping a trunk for a hurried pas
senger, a friend accosted him and, ex
pressing great surprise, said:
"Charles Stillman! what are you do
ing here?"
Placing his knee on the trunk and
pulling strenuously at the rope, the
young millionaire sputtered:
"Working on one of the strongest
trunk lines in the country."—Pittsburg
Dispatch.
No Escape.
"Yes," said Putzincalls of Wall
street, "I went up to that 'way-back
country place for the summer, think
ing to get away from all thought and
reference to the street, I was so tired
of it but one day I saw my host walk
ing along with a big bucket in his
hand, and I asked him where he was
going.
'Goin* to water some stock/ said
he.
"So I saw it was no use, and I pack
ed up and came home."
KITC permanently cared. Ko flte or nervousness afttt
11 O first day's use of Dr. Kline's Great Nerve Restore
•r. Send for FREE SS.OO trial bottle ana treatise.
£&* fL H. &LZXS,Led.f 931 Arch Stretit, Philadelphia, Pa
A Bad Head.
Jinks—How's your wife. Blinks
Blinks—Her head troubles her
good deal.
Jinks—Neuralgia?
Blinks—No, she wants a new hat.
Misunderstood Her.
Joe—I love you I love you. Won't
j'bu be my wife?K
Jess—You must see mamma first.
Joe—I have seen her several times,
but I love you just the same.—
Murino Eye Remedy cures sore eyes,
makes weak eyes strong. All druggists, 50c.
Not Always Both.
Mrs. Drollwits—Why, Jonathan', do
you know they are going to court
martial that Lieut. Freshly?
Drollwits—No! What's the charge
against him?
Mrs. Drollwits—Why, it's for con
duct unbecoming an officer or a gen
tleman. I don't remember, which!
••Dyspepsia Tormented Me for Years. Dr.
p&rld Kennedy's Favorite Keraedy cured me.'' Mrs. O.
ft. Dougherty, MUlvllle, N. J.
Uaeu
As Bill shrewdly guessed, Jack's
watch was at "Uncle's," placed there,
moreover, by the owner himself, who
has not yet heard the last of that lit
tle transaction.—Cassell's London
Journal.
-#1
over 80 years. $1.00.
Something Else Needed.
One of the men employed in a cer
tain. factory is a keen judge of charac
ter, and his mates declare that as a
detective he would give points and a
beating to Sherlock Holmes.
The other morning a couple of his
fellow workmen approached him and
one began:
"I say, Bill, here's a go! Jack's lost
his watch! H® don't know exactly
how, but thinks he must have had his
pocket picked,- Can you do anything
in the matter?"
"Oh, yes," responded Bill, with a
8harp glance at the supposed victim.
"I could get it back again, but I should
want Jack's permission."
"You can have that, of course," mur
mured Jack, with a strange lack of
enthusiasm.
"But you'd have to give me some
thing else as well," continued the ama
teur detective.
"What's that?"
"The ticket," was the instant re
ply.
¥?.'
Cure to Stay Cured.
Wapello, Iowa, Oct. 10 (Special).—
One of the most remarkable cures
ever recorded in Louisa County is
that Of Mrs. Minnie Hart of this place.
Mrs. Hart was in bed for eight months
and when she was able to sit up she
was all drawn up on one side and
could not walk across the room.
Dodd's Kidney Pills cured her. Speak
ing of her cure, Mrs. Hart says:
"Yes, Dodd's Kidney Pills cured me
after I was in bed for eight months
and I know the cure was complete
for that was three years ago and I
have not been down since. In four
weeks form the time started taking
them I was able to make my garden.
Nobody can know how thankful I am
to be cured or how much I feel I owe
to Dodd's Kidney Pills."
This case again points out how
much the general health depends on
the Kidneys. Cure the Kidneys with
Dodd's Kidney Pills and nine-tenths of
the suffering the human family is heir
to will disappear.
A woman never cares anything
about tho answers to the questions
she asks.
GINSENG
Fortunes In little gard
everywhere. Sells In
American market at
•7 tc SIS per lb. costs to grow less then 1. Big
demand roots and seed (or sale booklet free write
to-day. 0ZAB.K OIMSENO CO., Sept. B, Joplin, Ko.
lENSION-2™—-™011-15'
Washington, D. C'.
3 jr» in clrll war, 15 udicatln^ claim a, atty sinoe.
S 5 5
MINNEAPOLIS,
a a 0 a a
aeaui-i'
5
R,
a,.,
ItLiv-
DEAR MRS. PINKITAM:—
A
•Snllllll
"Do you believe in a future state?"
asked the long-haired man with the
solemn voice.
"Well, I hope so, bet yorr life!" re
plied the man with the big mustache
and the wide-rimmed hat. "I live in
New Mexico."
I am sure PIso's Cure for Consumption saved
my life three years ago.—Mas. THos. Ronuiss,
Maple Street, Norwic.h, N. Y., Feb. 17,1300.
True to His Calling.
"Crowded out to make room for
more acceptable matter," as the editor
said, pushing away the plate of pork
and beans and reaching for strawberry
shortcake.
Sirs. Wlnilnwi Soothing: Syrap.
For children teething, softens tbo giiras, reduces In
flammation, allays pain, cures wind collu. 21c a bottle.
If a woman were the architect of
her own fortune it would be full of
closets.
WORLC.
GREATEST SHOE MAKER
S
si
PUTNAM FADELESS DYES
6 0
Ask dealer or we will s«ndrpost•paidrat 10c a package. Write (or free booklet—How to Dye. Bleach and Mix Colors.
BITAHUIHKB 1ST*
Woodward & Co., Grain Commission.
v..
ORDERS FOR FUTURE DELIVERY EXECUTED IX AU MARKETS.
'At4 "H
CK.II CM'
!V_ S 't'-
?SP
Mrs. Anderson, a prominent society
woman of Jacksonville, Fla., daughter of
Recorder of Deeds, West, who witnessed
her signature to the following letter, praises
Lydia EL Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
ever knew and thoroughly reliable.
"I have seen cases where women doctored for years without perma
ncnt benefit, who were cured in less than three months after taking your
Vegetable Compound, while others who were chronic and incurabla
came out cured, happy, and in perfect health after a thorough treatment
with this medicine. I have never used it myself without gaining great
benefit.
few doses restores my strength and appetite, and tones up
the entire system. Your medicine has been tried and found true, hence
I
fully endorse it."—MRS.
R.
ANDERSON, 225
A.
sonville, Fla.
Mrs. Reed, 2425 E. Cumberland St., Philadelphia, Pa., says:
"1
"DEAR MRS. PINKITAM:—I
!T.«
There are but few •wives and mothers who
have not at times endured agonies and such pain as only women know.
I wish such women knew the value of Lydia E. Plnkham's Vegetable
Con. pound. It is a remarkable medicine, different in action from any
I
Washington St-Jack-
feel it my duty
to write and tell you the good I have received
from Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound.
"I hdve been a great sufferer with femala
trouble, trying different doctors and medicines
with no benefit. Two years ago I wentufider
an operation, and it left me in a very weakly
condition. I had stomach trouble, backache,
headache, palpitation of the heart, and was very
nervous in fact, I ached all over. I find
yours is the only medicine that reaches
such troubles, and would cheerfully rec
ommend Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound to all suffering women."
When women are troubled -with irregular or painful menstruation, weak-'
ness, leueorrhaea, displacement or ulceration of tho womb, that bearing-down
feeling, inflammation of the ovaries, backache, flatulence, general debility,
indigestion, and nervous prostration, they should remember there is one tried
and true remedy. Lydia E. Pinkhamfc Vegetable Compound at once
removes such troubles.
..te
The experience and testimony of some of the most noted
women of America go to prove, beyond a question, that Lydla E.
Pinkham Vegetable Compound, will correct all such trouble at
once by removing the cause and restoring the organs to a healthy
and normal condition. If in doubt, write
Mrs.
Jllass, as thousands do. Her advice is free and helpful.
No other medicine for women in the world has received such wide
spread and unqualified endorsement. No other medicine has such a
record of cures of female troubles. Refuse to buy any substitute.
ennf) cannot forthwith produce tho original letters and slcnfttnraaat
tMtUttonUli, which will prove tfelr absolute genuineness.
VwVwW Igrdi* K. JMnkhiun Medicine Co., T.ynn,
Only a Territory Now.
Pinkham at l,ynn,
m-SOUTH-EAST'WEST
•row wibi* rim*
\SWEIi's
I
ONERS
Mf. JL.
i.
$£$1
I
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lit:
life
0!b» CLOTHING
fcV&RYWH&RL.
A.J.TOWa COLMSIQN.MA33l.K3JL
IIP
The best materials, dulled workmen aSS
Mtyoeven
.years
experience have moda
the
Split
TOWERo flickers. Coats and Mats
famous
world Ttvy are made
black
in
or^ellowforoverkinds
f*T
all of wet work.
T0WU CAHAMM CfluLlmltelTOBOiTft GUI
Thompson's Eyo Wafer
When Answering Advertisements
Kindly Mention This Paper.
8. D. N. U. -NO. 42— 1904.
W.L. DOUGLAS
.50 SHOES
$3
Oouglmm malm* mud mmilm
HI
of their exdfellent stylo,
*nd aaperior wearing qnalltiea. If could «bow
'•ISvH16 r*??1®00® peiwwn the shoes made In my factory
other makes and the high-grade leathers bmkk vol
would understand why W, Douglas $8,60 shoes coStmS
i*10*? 9ie*r rotter, wear toneee.
$6,263,040.00.
Hr^.i^n?la!,sru?r8Ptee8 their Talne by stumping his
S i. j® botiom. Look for tt—take no substitute^
JSxc&lelS? 'k*1*™ eTe,7wle*e. Color EvelcU wml
Superior In Fit, Comfort and Wear.
fhaee worn W.Z+poupUu $3.G0 shoti for the leut turlvt vttm
wtihobgolutesatu/aetion. I find them superior nJU^owfort
Bpd uwto otKeri cottmpfrom $5.00 to f7M."
B. S. McOUE, Dept. Coll., O.S. Int. Jtevenue, Rlchnumd*V+.
W. I.. Douglas uses Corona Coltskin tn bia S8JM
shoes. Corona Colt la conceded to be the
Patent Leather made.
8KKD 70S CATALOGUE OITTVO FULL XHSTSUOZXOSS
HOT TO OBDBR BY MAIL.
•v.
aouaiA*.
to a or a to a el a it guaranteed to give perfect results.
mm
bhmUm,
MONSUJC imua
°VnVnri?t"
mum.
4
1
•Sit-*--
mom
08mBO mhomm thmn mny oflNM1 mmnufmottu'mm
MV tho WOr#/« The reason W. L. Donglas SSJiO shoes an tbm
^otld
mmn'm
J8jei»U8e
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