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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, June 07, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1906-06-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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$36*
7*1 ~y&t
Ladies' Belts 48 and 25c
Silk Gloves 48
Heavy Thread Lace 5
Embroideries 45-35-25-5
Prints, only,., 5
Ladies' Hose 25 -15 -10
Children's Hose, 2 pr. 25
Infants' Hose 25 19 15
Iff We cater to the best
Shoe Trade
Ladies' Shoes only &2.05,
f{ 2.50, 2.25, 1.95,1.69, 1.48
Children's Shoes f.
1.48,-1.25, .85, .05 and .50
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Men's Shoes, $3.50, 8.00
2.65, 2.50, 2-25, 1.95,1.48
Hoys' Shoes
2.25, l!95, .and 1.48
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ill That Honest Goods can be sold to Honest Men at
Honest Prices
lOLtJME XXIIL. HUH LEY, SOUTH DAKOTA, TB.TLRSDAY, JU!NE 7, 190fi.
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tomers I extend a co?*dtal invitation. Here'are some of the pricos that will be placed on these pianos.
31011 Hat 2 00
Shirts
1 50, 1 25, 1 00 and 50
Men's fine Egyptian underwear
regular 50c values, per garment
Js ew arrivals in Ties
50 and 25c
For the Household
12qt granite iron pail 48c
3 qt kettle .... ,25c
14 qt dish pan .70c
JOH.XSOX IROS PORCELATX
Clips and saucers .... .48
Plates to match .48
Finest line of Fancy China
in the city
Ea'^s received same as
cash here
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AT PALMER'S MUSIC STORE^ PARKER, SOUTH DAKOTA
sONpv
FROM FACTORY TO YOUR HOME DIRECT
I will place on sale SATURDAY, JUNE 9 a car load of liigli grade pianos. Representing as I do the largest wholesale houses in the United
States and shipping direct from the factories in car load lots to your city, enables jibe to give you an opportunity to secure a piano at a very low p"ioo.
It is the quantity cash buyer who is in a position to make the price.
I come to you with prices never heard of in your city before, I expect to crowd six months business done by an ordinary dealer into one week and
thereby save time and expense. Think the matter over carefully and don't fail to at least come in and examine our stock. If vou arc not prepared to
pay cash I will extend to you credit of six, eight or twelve months, or if you wish to make a small cash payment down, my easy payment plan of enrh^
or ten dollars monthly will enable you to pay for a piano out of your savings and at no advance from our lowest spot cash price. The pianos will all be
marked in plain figures so you will know their real values. A guarantee, good as a farm mortgage, goes with every piano sold.
I will refund rail road fare to customers who buy pianos from us from neighboring towns and deliver pianos free of charge.^ To all prospective cus
ft
$147.50 185.50 225.00 247.50 eii-iid. 295
My store will be open evenings until nine oclock. Music every afternoon. You are cordially invited, Come early and make a nice* selection, .,(W"
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Ecnul)lican State Convention
TUi TICKET
For United States (Senator—
•3NS
Jionicur J. aM of Yankton,
For Governor—
CO 15 I. CRAWFOUD, of Huron.
For Congress
I'lin.O 1) Al.L. of Brookings.
V/. H. FAUKKlt. ot Deskhvood.
For I.K'iitenant. Governor—
11. C. SHOBEJi. of Hightaorc,
S. W. GLAliK, of ltedlteUI.
For Superintendent of 1'ublic Instruction—
HANS CSTHUI), of Sioux Falls.
For Commissioner ot School
O. C. DOKKKN. of Duel county.
For Railroad Commissioner—
GEOltUK IJICE, of Flandreau.
The republican state conven
tion held in Sioux Fal's Tuesday
was the largest in point of at
tendance and probably the most
enthusiastic ever held in the
state. It was the culmination of
a fight which has lasted a little
over two years. Having started
with the object of placing Coe 1.
Crawford in the governor's chair
it finally ended in a complete
rout of the old organization, and
a ticket made up from a new set
of men.
VJ*&
We have not space to give a
full report of the convention.
That can be left to the daily
papers. It is sufficient to com
ment on its work here. As a
whole the convention was one of
the most harmonious ever held tions of two
in the state. A feeling of good
nature prevailed and there was
little hard feeling at its close.
After the bitter fight of the
past two years there was some
danger that the victorious ma
jority would lose their heads aud
repeat the mistakes of the old
machine two years ago. But
such was not the case. The
machine faction was gives full
mfefSijiife,
Kl1'!""
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HERALD
s.
rcc'^rnition
t.
For Secretary of State—
I). 1). WIPF, of Olivet.
For Auditor—
JOHN Hi'.ltNlXG, of Ciunpbell county.
For Treasurer—
0. H. CAShlU,. ot Clinton.
For Attorney tjencral—
n«mmnKn»Mi
011
everv
minority lg-
thii rights ot the
nored or abused.
The test vote of the conven
tion came on the eudoisement of
a United States s-rjator. The
names of Robert J. Gamble and
E. W. Martin were presented and
Gamble won bv a vote of 90L to
468. This represented the com
parative strength or the two fac
tions. Philo IIr-11 and Col. Par
ker were nominated over Camp
bell and Burke by about the
same vote. For governor Coe I.
Crawford and Gov. Elrod were
presented to the convention.
Amid great enthusiasm Craw
ford received the nomination and
upon being called to the plat
form was given a tremendous
ovation. He responded in a
little speech that was an orator
ical gem and vfas so fair and
magnanimous to the opposition
that it won the admiration of all.
Elrod was then called and
pledged his support to the ticket.
This dramatic occasion repre
sented a reversal of the condi-
Crawford was the defeated one
and Elrod the victor. At that
time was sown much of the seed
of insurgency that resulted in
the complete overthrow of the
former organization.
From here on the work of ttie
convention was rapid and the
ticket given above was nomi
nated, most of the nominations
being by acclamation. The plat-
tv ~4.*f •Js!Fsff-
ron vention.
Da
necessary
priat .on
NUMBER 8
mmStr
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y,
V/\
been honored with a copy of hisf:
proclamation. Come to think it
over we missed the Arbor Day1
proclamation also. Guess
Ilerald is )t on the governor's 'I &
political map,
The state of South Dakota can- -v
not afford to allow its officials tor«s
rid on free railroad
Manv of the nrichine orgam/'^'^vjx
have charged that ihe insurgentr:',^"?.?^''
won by the aid
of
years ago when back whence they came we very
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commiueelform adopted endorses the presi-
aml in cvorv way ln-ated court- dent, demands t." iff revision,
couslv. With thrtfe contesting-' vors the aboli.iou of the freer.ti!- f*
delegations to be disposed of,
Tom Roberts, Kittred re's private
secretar\r, was made chairm:ni of
the committee on credentials
and ex-Governor Ilerried was a
member of the resolutions com
mittee. Of the contesting- dele
gations two supposedly favorable
t•.) the machine were seated and
one insurgent. Nowhere were presiding officer
load pass, the direct primary c.nd^f^
the popular election of United
fAate-i Senati r-.
v.
4
Judge Campbell's race for con*'^5
gress migiit be described as "s t'e,
^iine and coiT-cr\aii re."' &
•*.- ..
Chairman AlcMulty lacked
Utile of the vior needed by a.?VH
•o large a
w:t
fan
pas5es.
an
increased appro-
can be
rrr.-l» for
democratic
votes. We do not know that thir8-r.*ik%1
is true though certainly a good'
man democrats have become re
publicans -during the past four
1 a If he a re a to
much fear that it will be neccs-^
sary to lose the dear old Argus
Leader and many of the lesser*
aids of the late lamented. Maujr
of those who are kicking most
about the contamination of "pop"'
vote would not care for an inves
tigation of their otoii political
histories. After all it is what
we are now, not vvhat tye were*
that really cou&te.
•9
"•VvSfri-.-
every
officer. The tax p:i vers will®
pay it gladly. But the state cair"'
ill afford to longer travel on the'Jv*
charity of the railroads.
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