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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, March 21, 1907, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1907-03-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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C#mr County "tberald
VITCB PDBLISHING CO.
HUKLEY, SOUTH DAKOTA
NEWS Of THE WEEK IN EPITOME
DIGEST OF THE NEW8 WORTH
TELLING CONDENSED FOR
BU8Y READERS.
Washington Notei.
President Roosevelt has signed an
order restoring to the public domain
approximately 30,000,000 acres of land
recently withdrawn as coal lands.
Plans for the consolidation into one
fleet of all American warships on the
Pacific coast have been announced by
the navy department. Rear Admiral
Brownson will be commander-in-chief.
Admiral Mason, chief of the naval
ordnance bureau, has completed plans
for the construction of a torpedo fac
tory at the Newport naval station.
This is the first time the government
has undertaken to manufacture its tor
pedoes on a large scale.
United States Supervising Inspector
Birmingham at San Francisco has sus
tained the judgment of Inspectors
Bolles and Bulger in suspending for
six months the license of Capt. Thom
as Peabody. Peabody was charged
with negligence In allowing the trans
port Sheridan to run ashore at Bar
bers Point, Okau island, last August.
People Talked About.:
Foster L. Backus, formerly district
attorney of Kings county, New York,
a criminal lawyer of note, is dead.
Clinton Babbitt, Democratic memfcpr
at congress from the First Wisconsin
district in 1891 and 1893°, died at Be
lolt, Wis.
James Halmel, known to the world
as Brother Martin, the oldest member
of the Xaverian brotherhood In the
United States, died at Louisville of se
nility.
Harry N. Black, a well known Eng
lish actor, who had been leading man
with Crane, Gillette and Goodwin, died
at a sanitarium at Colorado Springs of
tuberculosis.
"Joe" Ullman, known throughout
the country as a sporting man, has
been placed in a .private sanitarium at
Belmont, Cal. Mr. Ullman is suffering
from nervous prostration.
Emma Kubicek, a pupil in the Illi
nois state.'.school for the blind and
knt^n as"the "second Helen Keller,"
Is de£d. She had given demonstra
tions at educational conventions in
many states.
Casualty.
Fire at Solon, Iowa, destroyed a
meat market, saloon and ice house.
Fire destroyed the Chippewa county
(Mich.) poor bouse, twenty inmates
barely escaping.
Fire at Brunswick, Ga., destroyed
the cross-tie wharves of F. D. Aiken,
causing a loss of $80,000.
By t"he exploration of ah Irrigation
plant at Matamoras, Mex., seven la
borers \yere scalded to death.
The Rock Island station ticket otnee
and residence of the agent at Center
ville, Iowa, were destroyed by fire.
An explosion In a district school
near Tipton, Ibwa, caused a panic
among the pupils and resulted In the
Injury of one boy.
The British steamer Columbia,
which caught fire while at sea, burn
ed to the water's edge and sunk. Two
men lost their lives.
Harry Little, day foreman for tne
Cleveland Cliff Iron company, was
killed at Gladstone, Mich., by the ex
plosion of a gas tank. ii
A passenger train was ditched near
Jamestown Ohio, and the engineer
and fireman were killed. The passen
gers were badly shaken up.
Joseph loder, a twelve-year-old boy
of Terre Haute, Ind., who was stricken
dumb eight months ago, coughed up a
broken tooth and at once began to
•talk.
Lillian Gardner, ten yearfe ol'd,"ot
Waterloo, Iowa, was attacked by a
bulldog belonging to Jacob H. Griffith
and was badly lacerated about the
chest and arm.
The building occupied by William
Green, the New York printer, from
whose presses Smart Set and Town
Topics are printed, vas burned, caus
lng a loss of $300,000.
Fire in the flve-story building occu
pied by the Parisian Steam laundry
and the Detroit Regalia coihpany at
Detroit, gutted the entire building.
The loss is something oyer $100,000.
From Other Shores.
It has been arranged for King Ed
ward to visit King Alfonso at San Se
bastian, Spain, during the tatter's an
nual spring sojourn.
A husband has been sold at Nagy
Bajon, Hungary for $250. This Is a
reversal of the custom of selling wives,
which is rather common in Hungary
•s a form of divorce when ,a. man cov
ets another womanJfek
r, former preal-
Jean Casimir-P«
dent of France, is dead In Paris. His
public career was practically coeval
with the advancement of the Third re
public.
Emperor William has offered the
German military volunteer automobile
corps a prize for a long-distance race,
on the lines of the cavalry distance
race.
Emperor William has bestowed
Upon Prof. Ernest Haeckel, founder
IS ot the Aaapclatlon for the Propagation
ot Ethical Atheism, the title of excel
lency, in honor of his golden jubilee
as a doctor-
Th« Chinese army has selected fif
teen students from the Paotingfu mili
tary college to stady military science
In France.
Lord Penrhyn, whose dispute with
his employes at the Bethesda slate
quarries brought him into a great deal
of prominence, is dead at London.
Lord Curzon, former viceroy of In
dla, has been elected chancellor of the
Oxford university by 1,111 votes
against 436 cast for Lord Rosebery.
The visit to Lisbon of Frederick Au
gustus, king of Saxony, is understood
to be In connection with,negotiations
looking to the marriage of the crown
prince of Portugal, the duke of Bra
ganza, with a princess of Saxony.:
The Italian government has decided
to send a special commissioner to the
Isthmus of Panama to Btudy the condi
tions of the Italians employed on the
canal. Reports have been received in
Rome that the conditions of these la
borers is most distressing.
Crimes and Criminals.
Dr. Oliver C. Haugh, the Dayton
murderer, now in the annex of the
Ohio penitentiary, will be electrocuted
on April 6.
Lawson Emerson, former clerk of
the supreme court of Ohio, was indict
ed at Columbus on the charge of em
bezzlement of $3,153.
Alonzo Jolly was killed by John
Collier, hia son-in-law, who was hur
riedly taken away from Pana, 111., as
mob violence was threatened. Family
troubles caused the tragedy.
Horace G. McDowell, president of
the Farmers' Bank of Canton, Ohio,
shot and killed himself at his country
home. He was known, throughout Ohio
as a breeder and buyer of high-class
sheep.
Sam Miller, a retired farmer of
Charles City, Iowa, attempted to mur
der his wife. H» is in the county Jail.
He Is a drinker and is quarrelsome.
His wife is in a serious condition, but
may live.
Richard Kennedy, Jr., twenty years
old, of Solon, Ohio, struck his father
with a baseball bat, killing him in
stantly. His father and mother were
quarreling and the son came to his
mother's rescue.
Leaping head-first from a window
ledge on the thirteenth floor of the
Traction building at Cincinnati, Ger
trude Hanish, aged twenty years, a
stenographer, committed suicide in
the sight of hundreds.
When the case on preliminary hear
ing charging Harry Macke with as
sault upon fifteen-year-old Ruby Long
was called at Webster City, Iowa, the
complaining witness did not appear
and the case was dismissed.
Unsuccessful in hiB efforts to affect
a reconciliation with his wife, from
whom he had been separated, E. M.
McNair of Port Arthur, Tex., shot and
killed Mrs, McNair, wounded her
mother and fired five shots into his
own breast.
Domestic.
Frank Gotch won from Farmer
Burns at Chicago in two straight falls
at catch-as-catch-can.
.The Standard Oil company has ad
vanced the price of all oils 10 cents a
barrel, the new price being $1.78.
The Harvard observatory has re
ceived a cablegram from Nice an
nouncing the discovery of a new com
et.
The Indiana legislature has adopted
a concurrent resolution favoring the
election of United States senators by
popular vote.
Agitation against emigration is ac
tive in Madrid. About 700 families
sailed recently from Malaga for the
Hawaiian islands.
The South Chicago employes of the
American Shipbuilding company have
gone on a strike. Between 800 and 900
men are affected.
The Bulgarian national assembly
haB adopted an extraordinary credit of
$6,400,000 demanded by the govern
ment for new armaments.
Anthracite operators have agreed to
make the usual 50-cent reduction in
the price of coal on April 1, when the
new spring schedule will go into ef
fect.
Knoxville, Tenn., by a majority of
nearly 2,000 votes, has decided that
the saloons must go. Six months will
be allowed the saloons In which to
close.
The Illinois senate has adopted a
resolution accepting the war collection
of Mrs. John A. Logan and providing
for a place in the capitol and state ar
senal for the trophieR.
The Union Pacific railroad has an
nounced that work on the Athol hill
cutoff near Cheyenne, Wyo., would be
discontinued on account of legislation
entailing a cut in rates.
Sir William Crookes says that the
story from Ataerica about the weight
of souls is absolute nonsense. Dr.
Salesby said that it is a new and most
Imbecile version of materialism.
The MissouM senate has passed a,
bill giving the secretary of state aul^pt
lty to revoke the licenses of foreign
corporations which remove siiftfc from
state to federal courts without the
written consent of the other party to
the suit.
After spending four hours at his
farm south of Cedar Falls, Iowa, show
ing a prospective renter about the
place, Charles H. Foote, seventy-five
years old, returned home and before
he could remove his overcoate dropped
dead. Heart failure, brought on by his
exertions, Is believed) to have caused
his death.
Joshua Wallace Voohies, a negro,
has filed a petition asking that his
name be placed on the ticket as an in
dependent candidate for mayor of Kan
sas CJty, Kan. Voohies was born a
slave In Nashville, just before the
close of the war.
THAW SANE SAYS
STATE'S EXPERT
DR. FLINT, ANSWERING HYPO­
THETICAL QUESTION, SAiW**
HARRY WAS SA!fl£'-v
tlUMMEL'S STORY GIVEN TO JURY
TELLS OF AFFIOi IN WHICH
EVELYN SAID THAW BEAT
-:v.',
HERkfe
H?
New York, March 15.—After a fore
noon session occupied almost entirely
by District Attorney Jerome in a bit
ter denunciation of the defendant and
his wife, the trial of Harry K. Thaw
for the murder of Stanford White was
adjourned shortly after 12 o'clock yes
terday until this morning. The prose
cuting attorney found his opportunity
to attack Thaw and Evelyn Nesbit in
arguing on the question of the admis
sibility of the testimony which Abra
ham Hummel, the lawyer who is under
indictment for subornation of perjury
in the Dodge-Morse divorce case, has
to offer.
Says Thaw Was 8ane.
New York, March 16. Answering
precisely the same hypothetical ques
tion in response to which the alienists
of the defense declared that Harry K
Thaw was suffering from an unsound
mind when he shot and killed Stanford
White. Dr. Austin Flint, the first ex
pert called yesterday by District At
torney Jerome in rebuttal, declared it
to be hia opinion that Thaw positively
did know the nature and quality of
his act and. knew that the act was
wrong. When the court adjourned for
the day Mr. Delmas had not begun his
cross-examination of Dr. Flint.
After repeating to Dr. Flint the
same question which Mr. Delmas put
to the experts for the defense and hav
ing him declare that Thaw was sane,
on the assumption of the facts therein
stated, Mr. Jerome had read to the
witness the prosecution's hypothetical
question, which contained 15,000
words, and which required one hour
and eighteen minutes in the reading.
Dr. Flint again said without qualifica
tion that Thaw was sane and knew his
act was wrone.
Delmas Fights Every Inch.
l:
New York, March 17.—With Attor
ney Delmas fighting him every inch ot
the way. District Attorney Jerome
yesterday secured from Abraham
Hummel his complete story as to the
affidavit which it is alleged Evelyn
Nesbit Thaw made in the lawyer's of
fice in 1903, charging Harry K. Thaw
with beating her, and when she had
told him that the statement that Stan
ford White had drugged and ruined
her was not true. Mr. Delmas, first
objecting broadly to all of Hummel's
testimony, offered a specific objection
to each question put by the prosecutor.
Justice Fitzgerald overruled every ob
jection.
iv7 Evelyn Thaw Called.
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw was called to
the stand in the effort of the defense
to keep Hummel silent. She declared
she had called upon Hummel in his
professional capacity and to seek his
advice as a lawyer. Justice Fitzgerald
declared that, admitting the proposi
tion of counsel and client, Mrs. Thaw
had herself waived the professional
privilege by taking the stand early in
the case and giving her version of
what transpired at Hummel's office.
Gets Hummel's Record.
Unsuccessful in blocking Hummel's
testimony, Attorney Delmas in cross
examining the witness brought from
his own lips the fact that he had
been convicted in December, 1905, on
a charge of conspiracy. He further
admitted that two indictments for sub
ornation of perjury are pending
against him and that one of these in
dictments charges him with having
caused a false affidavit to be made.
Mr. Delmas wanted to know If Hum
mel' had any more recent business
transactions with the district attorney,
and asked if Mr. Jerome was pressing
the charges against him.
"He certainly is," said the witness,
with spirit.
Affidavit Held Up. |f^
At the conclusion of this testimony
District Attorney Jerome asked per
mission to introduce the carbon and
photographic copies of the affidavit in
evidence. It was near the closing
hour, and Mr. Delmas asked that ad
journment be taken before arguing as
to the admissibility of the affidavit. He
said that after reading the paper
over he might not object to its being
offered in evidence. "Coming, as it
doeg," he said, "in such questionable
shape, yte may. deem it best to have
the paper go in evidence."
District Attorney Jerome completed
his medical testimony during the
morning session, Attorney Delmas, for
the defense, declining to cross-exam
ine any of the experts.
DUTCH BEAT REBELS.
Kill of Capture 552 Men and Women
on Celebes.
The Hague, March 17.—An official
dispatch received here yesterday from
the island of Celebes, Dutch East In
dies, announced that the Dutch troops
had captured an important rebel
stronghold, after a stubborn fight.
The fleeing enemy left 280 dead on the
field, among whom were several rebel
chiefs. The troops captured 200 wom
en and 72 men. The losses of the
Dutch are Insignificant.
LOSS (F LIFE CAUSED BV FLOOD
MANY TOWNS IN MONONGAHELA
VALLEY SUBMERGED*— PROP
ERTY LOSS HEAVY. 3
Pittsburg, March 15.—The Mononga
ela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers are
rising rapidly. A stage of twenty-five
feet has been reached in this city and
by to-day\twenty-eight feet is antici
pated. Tils stage is six feet over the
danger mark and will Inundate the
lower portions,of the city.
Damage'Reaches Millions.1
Pittsburg, Pa." March 16.—The great
est flood in the history of Western
Pennsylvania, WesJ Virginia and East
ern Ohio is now being experienced.
The water continues to rise at the
rate of two-tenths of an Inch an hour,
and at midnight was thirteen feet
above the danger mark.
The damage to perishable goods and
property Jin the Pittsburg district is
estimated at $10,000,000. In addition
much destruction to property has oc
curred in Western Pennsylvania and
West Virginia. At Connellsville, Pa.,
the damage to the coke region is esti
mated at $2,000,000.
Over 100,000 persons are out of em
ployment. All the mines along the
Monongahela river are flooded. The
flood directly affects over 2,500,000
people, and thousands of families are
homeless. Railroad, telegraph and tel
ephone service is crippled. Within
the last thirty-six hours fourteen fatal
ities directly due to the flood have oc
curred.
Loss Is $9,337,000.
Pittsburg, March 17.—With the rap
id receding of the waters in the Mo
nongahela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers,
conditions are' fast assuming normal
proportions, and the greatest and most
destructive flood in the history of the
city Is at an end. At nightfall the ap
proaches to the bridges were clear of
water, and several hours later street
car service in the flood district was re
sumed.
Ten square miles were inundated.
The loss in dollars probably will never
be known, but an estimate thus far in
Allegheny county may be summarized
in the following table:
Loss in output of steel mills..$3,000,000
Loss in output of other in
dustries .". 2,000,000
Loss in wages of employes .. 1,837,000
Estimated damage to Indus
trial plants 2,500,000
Total *$9,337,000
Flood Is Subsiding.
Reports from all parts ot Western
Pennsylvania are to the effect that the
flood has subsided and efforts are now
being made to clear up the wreckage.
Fires Add to Horror.
Wheeling, W. Va., March 17.—Fires
added horror to the stress of flood in
the Wheeling district last night, caus
in a loss of a quarter of a million dol
lars. ,,
"DOGS IN HELL," WROTE DOLL IE.'
In Posthumas Sermon He Says He
Will Return to Cruch Enemies.
Chicago, March 16.—Six weeks be
fore he died John Alexander Dowie
prepared his own funeral sermon. Be
cause of the character of the sermon,
however, it was decided not to permit
it to be read at DoWie's funeral yester
day, lest it should bring great dissen
sion in Zion City, which is now torn
to pieces by religious factions.
The sermon prepared by Dowie
makes it plainly evident that he did
not forgive his enemies before he died,
as he lashes those who ousted him
from control as "dogs of hell." Dowio
concluded his posthumous sermon in
the following words:
"I shall return and with ruthless
hand shall I exterminate the vipers
and the dogs of hell that now hold the
high places in the city of Zion."
JAPANESE COOLIES ARE BARRED
President Keeps Promise to Californi
ans—Japs in School.
Washington, March 16. President
Roosevelt yesterday issued an execu
tive order directing "that Japanese or
Korean laborers, skilled or unskilled,
who have received passports to go to
Mexico, Canada or Hawaii, and to
come therefrom, be refused permission
to enter the continental territory of
the United States.
Nine Girls Admitted.,
San Francisco, March 16.—Nine' in
tle Japanese girls who had applied for
admission to the Redding primary
school were admitted yesterday after
an examination as to their knowledge
of the English language. The admis
sion of the Japanese children followed
the action of the board of education
yesterday rescinding the resolution
which barred Jaj ane&e pupils from ^e
schools. r,
1
Honduras Is Badly Whipped
Managua, Nicaragua, March 17.
The Nicaraguan government yesterday
issued a decree recognizing the provi
sional government of Honduras and
declaring its members to be allies of
Nicaragua.
The last battle fought between the
Nicaraguans and Hondurans was so
decisively in favor of the former that
it is believed it will result in bringing
the war to an end.
?v
Prefers Death to Disgrace,
Washington, March 17. Rather
than face prosecution for the embez-
zlement of $2,000,000 from the broker
age firm of Wade & Hedges, of which
he was manager, Charles Abbott,
twenty years old, late last night com
mitted suicide by shooting.
'.
Two Get Life Terms.
Burlington, Iiwa, March 17.—Arnold
Zimmer (white) and Tom Grimes (col
ored), who pleaded guilty to the mur
der of John Gavin on Jan. 22, were
sentenced to life Imprisonment.
v.s
ROCKEFEUER TO
ASTONISH WOULD
WILL DONATE IN HIS WILL $250,-
QPO.OOO FOR EDUCATION AND
CHARITY.
BIGGEST SHARE FOR CHARITY
.-4-
SCARCELY A MAN, WOMAN OR
CHILD THAT WILL NOT BE
VMS*
BENEFITED.
pj
1
New York, March 19.—The Herald
says that, according to a member of
John D. Rockefeller, Jr.'s Bible class,
and who is also a personal friend of
John D. Rockefeller and in a position
to know of his affairs, the latter pro
poses soon to make a princely gift to
the city of New York. It will amount
to at. least $50,000,000. It will be part
ly charitable and partly educational.
Will Astonish the'World.
This man informed a Herald report
er that when Mr. Rockefeller was con
ferring with his son at Lakewood, N.
J., a fortnight ago, the meeting was
not for the purpose of discussing any
immediate gift, but was on the subject
of Mr. Rockefeller's will, which docu
ment the oil king was then completing
with the aid of his son and his 1
yers.
It was said that this document will
astonish the world when it is made
public. It will, it is declared, donate
no less than $250,000,000 for charitable
and educational purposes, and it will
be so bestowed that the benefit there
from will almost be perpetual.
BIG BRIDGES WASHED OUT.
Cincinnati 8uffers Loss of $150,000—
Another Flood at Pittsburg.
Cincinnati, March 18.—'The city suf
fered a loss of about $150,000 early in
the day by the collapsing of the
Eighth street viaduct over the rail
roads of the Mill creek section of the
city.
Fortunately the accident occured
at an hour when there was no one on
the bridge.
With a stage of sixty-one feet ».
o'clock yesterday afternoon, it was
lieved that the crest of the big Ohio
flood was not far away.
Another Flood Stage
Pittsburg, Pa., March 19.—'With the
miles of ice in the Allegheny river
above Parker, Pa., and a drizzling rain
throughout Western Pennsylvania, lo
cal rivermen are looking forward to
another flocfd stage in this city. Prep
aration^- are being made to prevent
any serious damage when the gorge
arrives.
Five Hundred Homes Surrounded.
Huntington, W. Va., March 19.—The
river reached its highest point here at
2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, when
the stage was 58.3. After remaining
stationary two hours it began to re
cede slowly.
Some 500 homes in Huntington and
Central City are surrounded with wa
ter. Cattleburg. Caredo and Proctor
ville are almost entirely flooded
HEARINGS BY PROXY.
Commerce Commissioners Too Busy to
Travel About the Country.
Washington, March 19.—The work
of the interstate commerce commis
sion has grown so heavy that it has
been decided to discontinue the hear
ings which have been conducted by
members of the commission outside of
Washington.
Hereafter when it is found necessa
ry to conduct investigations in other
cities special agents will take the tes
timony and report to the commission,
and the arguments on cases will he
heard by the commissioners in this
city,
THREE GUILTY OF GRAFT.
County Officers Convicted on Accom
plice's Testimony.
Ashland, Wis., March 19: After
twenty hours' consideration the jury
in the case of The State vs. Mike Col
lins, Vought and McDonald, county of
ficers of Mellen, brought in a verdict
of grafting in town orders. They were
indicted a year'ago and were convict
ed largely on the testimony of an ac
complice.
BOXES FALL ON BOY.
^re Jarred Ffom Pile on Dray and Se
riously Injure Lad.
Faribault, Minn., March 19. Leo
McVey, a young son of William Mc
Vey, was seriously injured while rid
ing on .the rear end of a dray loaded
with filled boxes. In some way sev
eral of the boxes, weighing about 400
pounds, were jarred off of the pile and
fell upon the boy. The injuries are
of a severe nature, although not nec
essarily fatal.
Auto Strikes Street Carl
*, Mhineapolis, March 19.— Mrs. John
M. Murray was seriously and possibly
fatally injured when an automobile in
which she was riding collided with a
street car. Mrs. Murray was hurled
about fifteen feet and struck on the
back of her head.
Fall From Coach Fatal, t
Grand Rapids, Wis., March 19.
Orne Simpson, employed at the Green
Bay railway depot as baggageman,
was instantly killed by falling from a
railway coach.
-X
FEU ABOUT BROWNSVILLE RAH
DISCHARGED NEGRO SOLDIEI
MAKES FULL CONFESSION AT
GALVESTON.
Galveston. Tex., March 19.—Accord I
ing to a story printed yesterday byl
the Galveston News, the mystery sur-|
rounding the murderous midnight raidl
of the negro soldiers from the Twenty-L
fifth Infantry upon the people oil
Brownsville, Tex., on Aug. 13 last yearj
has been cleared up. A full statement!
has been made by one of the discharg-T
ed negroes, who admits that he par-|
tially participated.
Was Not Premeditated.
According to the statement, the out
rage was not premeditated, but wasl
the result of an an alleged Injury donel
one of the soldiers by a white man inl
Brownsville about a half hour before!
the raid was niade. The negro, return-1
Ing to the barracks, seized his rifle and I
announced that he was going to kill!
the white man. Several of the negroes
voluteered promptly to go along and I
see the work well done and to wipel
out old scores which they had against
the citizens on account of the injuries
which they had claimed to have suf
fered.
Helped Clean Guns. ii
The negroes returned to the bar
racks after committing the assault on
the town, and many soldiers assisted
in the hurried cleaning of the guns for
the inspection which followed soon
after the shooting in the town ceased.
Apparently the soldiers from only|
one company participated In the raid,
although practically the entire bat
talion knew that soldiers had done the
shooting.
The man who talked to the reporters
gave his name as D. C. Gray and
stated that he was formerly a private
in Company of the Twenty-fifth In
fantry- ..JS*
CINCINNATI IS SHAKEN UP.
Explosion of 250 Pounds of Dynamite
Causes Great Damage.
Cincinnati, March 19.—By the explo
sion of 250 pounds 'of dynamite in a
shack on the site of the new city hospi
tal early yesterday enormous damage
was done to residences and buildings
all through the surrounding section.
People all over the city and suburbs
were awakened, and it is feared that
patients in the Jewish hospital might
suffer serious results from the shock.
All glass within a radius of half a mile
was broken, neighboring store fronts
were blown out, furnaces dismantled
by the shock, sewers disconnected
and other damage was done. The Ger
man Old Men's Home and the Jewish
hospital were the largest buildings
near the explosion, which occurred in
Avondale, one of the best known resi
dence sections, and both suffered seri
ously. The cause of the explosion is
unknown, but incendiarism is suspect
ed, a number of men recently dis
charged by the hospital contractors
being said to have made threats.
SEVENTY FIVE DEAD IN MINE.
Terrible Disaster Caused in German
Mine by Explosion.
Ferbach, Germany, March 19. An
explosion of fire damp in an under-'
ground shaft of the coal mine at Klein?*1
rosseln, near here, resulted in thie
death of seventy-five miners and the
terrible injury of twelve others.
Six of the miners who were in the
shaft at the time of the explosion are
still missing. One hundred and seven
teen others escaped into adjoining gal
leries.
Rain was falling heavily and the
most distressing scenes of grief were
witnessed as the bodies were brought
up by twos and threes and laid out un
der a blaze of electric lights. Many of
the bodies were so disfigured by the
force of the explosion that they were
scarcely recognizable.
LOCK GIRL IN SAFE.
Burglars Beat Her and She May Not
Recover.
Evansville, Ind., March 19. Bur
glars entered the R. & G. furniture
store ^11 Main street shortly after mid
night. Miss Josie Gray, the bookkeep
er. was in the store, posting the books.
The burglars beat the woman into in
sensibility, and then broke open the
safe and after robbing it of $500
locked her In the same.
The young won/ui was removed to a
local hospital and is in a serious condi
tion. She mav die.
"Sr 1 -J" Jilt,,
"TP*
BIG STEAMER ON ROCKS.
Suevic Strikes During Fog—No Loss
of Life Anticipated.
London, March 19.—The White Star
line steamer Suevic struck on the
rocks and went ashore near the Lizard
in a thick fog at 11:30 o'clock last
night.
Two lifeboatB have been launched
and others haye been summoned to go
to the assistance of the vessel.
There are about 400 persons on
board he Suevic, but no loss of life is
^icipated.
Sine,air Colony Suffers.
Englewood, N. J., March 19.—By the
burning of Helicon hall, the home ot
the Upton Sinclair co-operative colony,'
one man was killed and eight of the
colonists were injured in jumping
from windows.
Walkerville Has $105,000 Fire.
Windsor, Ont.. March 19.—The Cath
olic church of Our Lady of the Lake
and'thfc' McGregor-San well Fence com
pany's plant *fct Walkerville were de
stroyed by fire. Combined loss, $106,
000.
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