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Turner County herald. (Hurley, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-19??, March 24, 1910, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063133/1910-03-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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Turner County Herald
By The Fitch Publishing Company
Trhms:
Ji.wt
Few Yeah In
HURLEY, S.
advance
P.,
MAR724,
1910
The Amorican Hall of Fame
seems to be an established fact
so far as those whose names are
included, in its membership are
concerned. The Herald does not
believe that, this attempt to imi
tate the French Academy will
prosper on American soil. Every
citizen prefers to make up his
own list of immortals.
Recently a carload of stamped
envelopes and another of postal
cards were received at the Sioux
Falls postoftice, 11 coming by
freight. Such shipments were
formerly sent by mail thus help
ing to swell the amounts received
by .the railroads. Perhaps the
govern merit"*!# at last really try
to stop some oXj-he leaks in the
postoftice department.
Scotty Phillips, of Pierre, who
has one of the largest herds of
tame buffalo in- existence, has
decided to offer tlfe animals for
sale and they will probably be
disposed of in small lots for
breeding -purposes. Buffalo were
once in danger of extinction but
they are now increasing as the
l'ew herds of tame animals are
being carefully eared for.
In the tight for the reform of
the house rules the Herald is
pleased to note that Congress
man Martin voted and worked
with the insurgents. Martin has
always been inclined to be inde
pendent and we have never been
able to believe that his alliance
With the Cannon forces was so
Close that it could not be broken.
This action of Mr. Martin is in
accord with the overwhelming
sentiment of the state and ought
to make votes for him in the pri
maries. Of course Burke sup
ported the speaker on every
vote and he stated in his an
nouncement that no independent
taction
need be expected of him.
The argument of the regulars
in the lights that have taken
place in congress has been that
the party must be sustained.
Even President Taft has justified
his own peculiar course with the
statement that ours is a govern
meiifc by parties an so party dis
cipline liiust be enforced. Every
where it is the good of the party
that is urged and not the good
of the nation. Thus Cannon and
his adherents referred to the in
surgents as traitors. And they
Were traitors to party discipline.
But the era of party worship
is
passing. It is a worship upheld
chiefly by the office holders.
The people are now demanding
their rights and if the parties
Will
not give them what they
want then they will smash the
parties. This is the message to
the regulars of the insurrection
in congress.
What effect the recent house
disturbance will have on the
*Taft policies is a problem that
cannot yet be answered. It may
result in a better understanding
between the two factions and
thus facilitate legislation. It
Certainly will put an end to
Taft's former intention to declare
War on the insurgents* Also the
enactment of the tfaffc measures
'.depends very much dn Taft hi mi
Qelf. It is ndt sufficient for him
&> announce his tioiicies aiid then
down in sulky silende and
wait for then! to tie enacted as
fie has seetried to do iii the past
H® cannot ignore all cdngres
slonalleaders save Aldrich and
tSfumon aitd their friends and
JtiU expect to find enthusiastic
for
his measures. In
*ve honorable citizens
representing their
note* even if the presi
doernot like the way they
lifchetiou If Taft has not
support of odngress
ifc
ii lueto
his 4wn mis*
«tubborne«» ftttd the
rMttses
thiafehe
•ooaer
SPEAKER CANNON DEFEATED
The past week has been tilled
with tremendous excitement at
Washington. After a bitter fight
lasting for three days late Satur
day a resolution creating a new
rules committee of ten and olim
mating the speaker from the
.the committee was passed by a
combination of insurgent and
democratic votes. Immediately
after a resolution declaring the
speaker's chair vacant was de
feated, most of the insurgents
voting to continue Cannon as
speaker.
This victory marks the end of
the clique that has been ruling
congress with an iron hand. It
showed that the people could
make their influence felt on con
gress and that blind worshiping
of party gods must end.
A new corninitte will be chosen
by party caucus and the regulars
will have it in their power to1
name members from their own
faction leaving the insurgents
without representation. The in
surgents are willing that they
should do this because it will re
lieve them of responsibility and
because it will still further dis
credit the stalwart faction with
the public. They have been
beaten once. If. they have not
learned anything let them con
tinue their old reckless course.
The moral effect of the election
of the new rules committee' will
be tremendous and will operate
for the freer participation of the
public in the government. It is
another step in the direction of
government by the people them
se Ives.
It is a standing joke with the
editors that every reader of their
papers is sure that he could
edit the paper better than does
the. editor. But thare is another
class that gets as much free ad
vice as the editors and that is
the farmers. Every citizen in
the land, be his business what it
may, is certain that he could run
the farms better than do the
farmers. He could grow bigger
crops, make more money, have
things better arranged and work
less and play more than do the
fanners. Why all th5se gifted
agriculturists do not stop strug
gling at some less gainful occu
pation and get rich farming is
not fully known. Perhaps some
real farmer could tell the reason.
President Taft has stated that
this is a government of parties
and without them we may as
well get out of business for we
will never get ahead without
parties. There are those who
will think that Washington was
the wiser statesman when, in his
farewell address, lie stated that
the greatest menace of the future
was the growth of party spirit
and bitterness. He considered
that only harm could come from
extreme partisanship and advised
his countrymen to avoid dividing
themselves into different and
hostile political parties.
Canton and Chamberlain each
adopted the commission plan of
government this week.
HOW GOOD NEWS SPREADS
"I am 70 years old and travel
most of the time," writes B. F.
Tolson, of Eiizabethtowh, Ky.
"Everywhere I 'go recommend
Electric Bitters, because I owe my
excellent health and vitality to
them. They effect a cure every
time." They never fail to tone the
the Stomach, regulate the kidneys
and bowels, Stimulate the liver, in
vigorate the nferves arid purify the
blood. They work wonders for the
weak, run down men and women,
restoring strength, vigor arid health
thats a daily joy. 'fry them. Only
50c. Satisfaction is postively &uat
anteed by H. J. Pier.
Fortify now against the Grip—for
it comes every season sure! Preven
ts cs—the little Candy Cold Cure
Tablets—yffer in .this respect a most
certain and dependable safeguard.
Preventics at the "sneeze stage''
will, as well, also surely head off all
common colds. But promptness is
all-important. Keep Preventics in
the pocket or purse, for instan£use.
BflftjoMffcttf* Sold bgr Fkr.
I*
0009 EAHTH ROAOS,
Cl:9.:.por Than Other Highways
cr.d Easy .to Build.
GCCD DHAI.NAGE A NECESSITY
It Is One of the Principal Points In
IViaking a Gocd Dirt Roadway—Thsy
Are Pr3ferrcd In Many Sections of
the United Stats3.
J-oii.u' si}? I bfx-nnie convinced that if
we were to have roads in our day
and gcuur.-] lion wo must, sock some oili
er methods of doinu ilu* work and
some oilier material than macadam.
Kor while stone roads have mid per
haps always will have an adaptation
for certain districts on account of
the lack of facilities for good drain
a ic, which is one of the principal
points in the construction of eart'.i
roads, or where the character of the
soil is such that pood earth roads can
not. lie made or for (horoui -!il'are.
where 1 he travel is great and the valu
ation hi enouu'h to sland the taxa
tion. the expense is far too great to
make them practicable for oven a
small proportion of all the roads.
It must be remembered iha't 110 mat
ter how good a stone road is construct
ed I here is a certain amount of wear
and tear each day and month and year.
I, ./illl-K?:
feliSi®
ii S S
Prom Good Roads Magazine. Now York.
A TilMCAl. JUIKAXj KAli'l'lI liOAD.
The amount of this wear has been
lound by experience to he from one
fourth to one-half inch a year.
Others have ligured it at only two
thirds -of a cubic yard per year.
\v'o also have the experience of city
street making. With all of their great
valuation to tax cities have found it
burdensome" to keep up good paved or
ma0.-H1
amied st reels
Mii.d, 1 am not speaking against mac
adami:: roals. 'I'hey are, so iar as
our knowledge of roadmaking now
goes, the one thing for thoroughfares
or oilier places where the valuation
Will airord them without burdensouie
taxation. And many of such places
throughout the United States prefer
the well built dirt road. What we
want is good roads now, and the ques
tion is how to make them with what
uionoy is available, and 1 think it is
the wrong policy for a township that
has only from §-J,flOO to $10.(100 a year
to spend 011 roads to lay it all out 011
a mile or two of stone road when by
the right, methods goad earth roads
could be k.'pt up over the whole town
ship with the same money or less.
Tite solution of this. 1 am convinced,
is iu learning how to make earth roads.
1 believe that by proper methods of
roadmaking the e.ir roads, especial
ly in places where the nature of the
soil and the facilities for good drain
age are favorable, can be made and
kept as good as or better 011 the average
than the stone road and at but a frac
tion of the cost.
The nature of the soil and the facili
ties for drainage are so varied that ifr
is impossible to lay down any one rule
or method of roadmaking. At some
places uothitig but macadam will do,
but there are many, many oilier places
where the earth roads can bo mdcle
equally good. In fact, in places wlieVa
the soil is .lust right—that is, porous
enough to let the water through and
yet tenacious' enough to pack and not
become dusty—and the drainage nat
urally good the earth road Is the very
best that. 05111 be made. And most soils
will in a large degree take 011 the qual
ities necorssnry for good roadmaking
after good drainage is effected.—J.'G.
Houisher iu Good Roads Advocate.
Secretary Knox For Good Roads.1
Secretary Knox believes that ill.'
congestion of population in great
Is caused iu large,
good roads in this country.
cities
part
by the
lack
of
He
told
the'house committee on foreign affairs
that the reason France is
the
richest
agricultural country In the world, is
because she has had .good, roads so
long. He said: "The agricultural pop
ulation of France does not have- to
spend its mouey iu repairing vehicles
and their harness every winter. 1
think It has improved the attractive
ness of rural life. I think it has caus
ed the population to remain on 'the
soil more than iu any other country.
You do not find that tendency to urlnu
population lu France and England that
yoti do in this country."
Use cf a Drag on Gravelly Roads.
In soils full of loose stones or qven
small bowlders the drag has done
good service. The loose stones, are
drawn into a windrow down the cen
ter of the1 road, while the earth is de
posited around the bowlders in such
a way that the surface Is leveled.
The loose stones in the center of' the
road should of course be removed.
Where there to a large proportion of
small atones or gravel the drag (will
keep down the ineqo&litiea tn tbraur*
UNCLE SAiVS AS ROAD BUILDER
Government Constructing Great High
ways In Nev.ly Developed Country.
Experts of many countries are mar
veling in the great roads which the
United States government has con
structed and is now constructing on
tlio reclamation projects in the far
western slates and territories.
More than (Kio miles of the most ex
cellent highways that it is possible
for man to produce have been com
pleted and are iu daily use.
These, of course, do not include the
byroads leading to many farms or the
many other roads being used for- thtt
time being until the macadamized kind
can be built.
The dry farmers have had good
horses and vohi los since the reclama
tion work began seven years ago, and
these good roads are enabling them
(.0 haul (heir products to the towns
and railroad stations and to send their
children to school. They regard them
us the most important of ail aids to
progress and prosperity.
Many of these pioneers own automo
biles, and it is no unusual sight to see
.u Saturdays or Sundays a dozen or
more motorcars of tiie laiest designs
in any of the towns of the older proj
ects. It is interesting to note that T'u
c-le Sam has only fairly beu^fov the
building of roads in this newly devel
oped country and that in a very few
years the mileage v.'iil be reckoned in
thousands where it is now counted in
hundreds.
KENTUCKY RG0K ASPHALT.
An Ideal Highway Built of It In De
troit, Mich.
A highway of which a Detroit publi
cation speaks in terms of high praise
is the road leading to the approach to
the ISelle isle bridge. It is surfaced
with Kentucky rock asphalt, under
speciiications, from which the follow
ing facts arc taken:
The subgrade was excavated and
brought: to an even surface eight and
one-hall'" inches below and paraiiei
with the proposed surface of the road
way and compacted bv roiling witii a
ten ton roller Upm this crushed
limestone two to four inches iu size
was placed and rolled to three inches
in thickness. "A second course of
similar sly.ed stone iiiied with lime
stone screenings and sand was aiso
rolled to three inches, making the
foundation courses six inches in thick
ness.
Oil this foundation was evenly spread,
a two and one-half inch course of
crushed limestone one and one-half to
two and one-half inches in size, which
was given one roiling. The asphalt
was then spread, being taken to the
road on wheelbarrows, dumped and
raked to a uniform depth of about
three-quarters of an inch in a loose
state, this being equivalent to about
1
-V
if
^SStfii.
From Good Roiids Magazine, New York.
LAYING ON THE ASPHALT.
forty pounds per square yard. This
was forced into the voids by two roll
ings. Theu another similar layer of
asplialt was applied, rolled twice, left
to stand until the next day. then rolled
again. The same plan was followed
during the two succeeding days, the
road being closed to traffic and one
rolling each day being given. The
road was then opened to trallic.
TAFT FAVORS STATE ROADS.
Chief Executive Thinks tha Highway
Question Not a National Matter.
National aid for permanent roads, a
system of national highways connect
ing the capital of the various states
and of state highways connecting the
various county seats, use of federal
prisoners for building roads and the
establishment of roadmaking on a
strictly business basis are some of the
suggestions made at the good roads
convention.
A letter from President Taft de
clared against natioual aid to any
great extent. The president says:
"My own view of the good roads
question la that it is chiefly a state
fuuetion and that all the states ought
to unite in an effort to promote good
roads. I do not think that the farmers
are as much interested In the matter
as they ought to be.
"Next to education, the system of
good roads is the greatest civilizer."
Tip on Road Maintenance.
Foreign countries are years ahead
of the United States In road building
and road maintenance. They keep
men constantly on the roads looking
for signs-of decay. As soon as a road
begins to unravel the spot is repaired,
ft must be cheaper and better, to re
pair the first Indications of deteriora
tion and always have the roads
good shape than to wait until a road
is impassable or full of ruts and gul
lies and then build a new one.
Good Road Movement Spreading.
The split log drag is still meeting fa
vor in many parts of the United States.
Good roads associations are being,
formed all the time, and better roads
are making their appearance over
many sections of the United States.
All this agitation wlli lend to perma
nent roads. The quicker the better.
W late the amvuHt
ary,il,lM0at
•y miuiiMBBm.UJa a tHfimWih-'t'nhn-a 6
I-I
A
•R
awzcgi1
*5.
Builders Ware, I
Poultry Ming and Slieliware
At Lowest Living1 Prices
Buggy Whips 20/• off. A first class
stock from which to make selection.
Browne's Hardware
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J. E. Kiondalt,
I''nr (jomity Trousnrer
To my friends of Turner Oounty:
I hereby announce my.seif as candidate for
tlie nomination for County Treasurer, subject
to the republican voters at the coming pri
mary in June. I have lived in Turner county
for the past 39 years and I believe thai my rec
ord and reputation is sufficiently well know!!
to the public frcnerally. If nominated and
elected I wiil serve the people to the best of
my ability. Very respectfully,
Jackson A. Davis, Davis," So. Dak.
For Couiity Trwisurer
To the Republican lilectors of Turner County:
I hereby announce my candidacy for the re
publican nomination for the nflice ofcoimty
treasnrer, at the primaries to be held in June
and respectfully solicit the support of the re
publican voters of the county.
If nominated and elected, I will endeavor to
faithfully discharge the duties of the office.
liespeotfullj, E.C. Nelson
For C'oimnissloiK'r
To the Republican voters of the fifth coniniis-'
siouijr district:
I take this opportunity of announcing my can
didacy forcouniy commissioner for the lifth
commissioner district subject to the actiou of
the republican voters at the primaries In .Tune.
A,W. Bacon
For Cuiumissini er
To the Republicans ol the fifth Commissioner
District:
I hereby announce that 1 will be a candidate
for liorniuat
ion for a second term as commis
sioner from this district, subject to your decis
ion at the June primaries,
fhas, js.
S
1ark
~y
_rt -V -J
-t ji '--'-'r .)/• r.
n'
ij*'.
Best Lowest prices
Your trade solicited
QUEAL &
utiuuinjMiiSS\K»ih5i^MruuCT^iriijC^^ jy
POLITICAL ANNOUNCMBNTS
County Trttitsurnr
Tii the republican electors of Turner County:
I lien by i:iouiice my candidacy for nomina
tion tortile oillct: of county t'.viisui er. at the
coming .!
unc primary, and respectfully solicit
tlit support of the republican voters of the
county. If nominated and elected. I v.'iil cn
deavor to discharge the duties of the ofllee in
a faithful auinner. Keispcctfully
1'.. M. w.MKutnruY
For l-ji-fjltftrr of IJt-etls
I desire to announce to the republicans of
Turner County that. I aid a candidate for the
office of register of deeds subject to the deoi
sion of the primaries in June. I have been a
resident of this county for thirty-one years
ami feel that my record v.'iil justify me com
itij before the people at th*s t.i!ne, It' nomina
ted aiul elected I piomise to give the best ser
vice of which I am capable.
years respectfully .:
anborn
«l OS WANTE1
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will b6
received up 1o 2o'clock v.
m„
I
April fitli. A. D.
1910, at the oltiee of the countv auditor of Tur"
ner county, at l'arker, S. 1). for all bridges to bo
built for the comity, durluc the period of one
year. Bidders to furnish plans and specillca-
A if
for SfjOO.OO Is required as a jjuarantee of good
taith on the nart of the bidder. The board of
county eommlssioiiers o£ said Turner county
reserves the right, to reject any aim all bids
S" U"
tllis l5t
m,(wt
"f Febru-
J- J. MURPHY,
County Auditor in ana for
Turner County, S. D.
Are you frequently hoarse?. Do
you have that annoying tickling in
your throat? Does your cough an
noy you at night, and do you raise
mucus in the morning? Do you
relief? If so, take Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy and you will be
Sold by H. J.
S. Dak.
9 acast5Tirs«i?n!3
v\AnJv^iririarinj !.an
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less Agency
INCORPORATED
FIRE
IN S A N E
muniruiruj
O N E
IN S A N E
O N A O
IN S A N E
•VUURMN
I N IN
IN S A N E
life
IN S A N E
FARM
LOANS
•nuwuiutc
STEAMSHIP"
TICKETS
FARMS
FOR SALE
HURLEY, SOUTH DAKOTA
R. F. SACKETT, M. D.
PHYSICIAN unci SUHGEOW
Office over Mansfieid's
i.lore
Hurlev. S. L)a^.
E.J. THOMPSON,
VBTKKISAKY SOitGEON AND
OKNTIST.
•vt Alurptiv Bros. stAble in Uuriey Saturdays
)auuice of time at home on farm in Spring Viil
town shin Phone No. 73. Hurlev Rural Wne
DR. A. E. JENNINGS
DENTIST
Office /on the corner over the
Mansfield Store
Phone No. 77 Hurlev. S. D.
Pinesalve
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