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Saturday news. (Watertown, S.D.) 19??-19??, August 14, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063549/1908-08-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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Always Buy
ALL KINDS OF
Had
\%£f3
if
'IW „vj
1ttf
ba rod to So affrkinds
fodo^suppllesthe same digestive
Juices $hat Are found In a healthy
8toma*&,Beinfca liquid, it starts
.gam. digestion at ofcee.
'W4 vi&^ol pot only dlgestB your food,
Jgl
^ou nwd e.Bufficlent amountof
S4 good, whotesome food to maintain
strength u»l health.
this food must be digested
:t!bbrbughly,otheriffi8e the paina of
oa
Garland Flour
v.#.
By so doing you will get the best and you
will also be helping
Home Industries
Our flour is milled under the best conditions.
W. H. STOKES MILLING CO.
There's Luxury
in Clean Linen
Stylo and comfort in your
shirts, collars and cuffs aro
always things of beauty by
having them done up right.
Waterto wo Steam Laundry
Phone Main 128
Brick Construction Work:
Carefully and efficiently attended to. Satisfaction
"guaranteed. The game careful attention paid to
small as well an big jobs. If you need anything in ,o
this line, call on
j.
A. P. MUNT
Phone Blue 22 316 Fourth Av. S, W.
Remember, When
You Need Livery
UR specialty is first-class
livery in every respect. Just
call up J. J. Ballou, Bur
lingto*V Barn, phone main
97.
IV:
day or night Phone
promptly attended to. Next time you
need livery give me a trial and I will see
that you are perfectly satisfied. -4 That's
my business.
Jas. HE* Ballou
Burlington Bam Phone Main 597
P. DAVIS
.W" Successor to.
-DAVIS* MUNT
Mason .Contractor
BRICK WORE CONSTRUCTION
and is titori^eqUippafe forjtt kinds of work ia this line. Small as well
as large 10% All work unaer my personal supervision.
/T Watertown, South Dakota^
Phone Blue 393 .0- |p
Kodol F#sDyipepsia
WiU Relieve You Almost Instantly.
and dyspepsia *re th|
am
yny*
*#55#
to a wtfWjft
S§fliP«8ii
$1
&
orders".
|§§fi
ill
iS?
&
Bo. don't neglect your stomaoh.
gon't become a chronic dyss
Keepyour stomach heartl
strong by taking a little Kodol.
You jdotft have to take Kodol all
the time. You only t&ke lt when
you need It.
Kodol Is perfectly harmleas.
Our Guarantee
owiU
The Saturday News
Published Every Fridayat Watertown, Codington County,
South Dakota, on Midway.
E. M. BARKER, EDITOR AND POBLISHER.
Entered at the Postorfice, Watertown, South Dakota, as Second Class Matter
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.
$1.50 in Canada.
Change in address may be made at any- time,
address.
Business Office
Residence
Anonymous communications will not receive attention,
sent to insure return of rejected manuscript.
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
LABOR'S SHARE
The fpllowing article from the Duluth Herald will be interesting
to those who are studying the industrial situation in this country.
The cause of labor is receiving much flattering attention these days,
just before the election, (for politicians always love the laboring man
just before the election, however much they swat him afterwards,) and
the figures given below, covering one of the most prosperous years in
our history,go to show that the lot of the workers is by no means to be
envied, and raises the question as to where our enormous national
wealth is going. It certainly is not passing into the hands of the work
ers, and it is very obvious that labor is not getting a fair shake at the
hands of the private owners of our national wealth and resources. It
must be borne in mind too that the figures named refer to 1905,and not
this present year of grace, when over six million workers are out of a
job. If wages are low when the tree is green, what must they be now?
It would hardly be safe to publish the figures it might incite to riot.
The article is packed with interesting facts and their lessons, and is
well worthy of careful study:
"What wage earners make is vastly important, not only to
themselves but to all members of society who are not wage
earners themselves, but whose livlihood depends upon the
patronage of wage earners, and who therefore prosper when
there are plenty of wages to be spent, and fail to prosper
when employment is scarce and wages are small. A census
bulletin has been issued, based upon statistics gathered in
1905, which contains some interesting information about the
wages paid the employes in the manufacturing industries.
The returns are not rates of pay, but actual earnings. Rates
are higher than earnings, because not all workers put in full
time.
Of the 3,267,019 wage earners covered by report, 69.4 per
cent were men, 17.9 per cent were women and 2.7 per cent
were children. The pay rolls of the 123,703 establishments
covered by the investigations showed that the men received
88.1 per cent, the women 11 per cent and the children nine
tenths of 1 per cent of the pay. More than half the wage earn
ers included in the report earned $9 and over per week. The
average man received $11.46 the average woman $6.17 and
the average child under 14 years of age received $3.46.
These rates are not likely to plunge workers in the manu
facturing industries into reckless dissipation on the contrary
they must involve pretty desperate struggling, in the majority
of cases to make both ends meet even when employment is con
stant.
The highest weekly average paid for the men in any manu
facturing industry was $21.68, the earnings of diarnondcutters,
polishers,ptc.The lowest average earnings for men were $5.23,
paid to thbse enfeaged in the ihantlfacture of rosin and turpen
tine and in the cottonseed oil and cftke industry wages were
noticeably low. Men in steel works and rolling mills earned
$12.56, and in the foundry and machine shops products $11.98.
As some of the men in these industries receive very high
wages,there must be a large body of poorly paid labor to bring
the average so low. S
Locality shows marked difference in wage earnings. The men
in New England cotton mills earned an average of $8.52
weekly,and the men in southern cptton mills earned only $5.14.
For the women northern average was $7.23, and the southern
$3.77. For children the New England average was $5.45 and
the southern average was $2.73. For all classes the average
weekly earnings in the north were $7.62 as ..compared with.
$4.16 in the south.
The western states showed the highest earnings. Montana
& led, with $18.19, and South Carolina was the lowest, with
$4.68 for all classes.The reason for the low wagesiii the South
is that the industries there do not require as high a class of
skill as those in the north altho there is no showing that the
requirements of the human system are any less in the south
than thev are in the north.
These figures,be it remembered,are for a year of great proa
iife parity and of ample enjoyment. Figures for last winter would
have been little short of shocking."
ur ^0% it
p. A SOCIAL EiffeRlMENT
The English house of Lords has receded from! its impossible position
on the old pension bll, which no^becomes law. The emphatic re
fusal of the Commohs to accept the Lord's amendment produced this
sudden change of heart. The working of the bill will be followed
with misgivings by Some,with hope by others, and with interest by all.
This act shows to what an extent the English government has departed
from the individualism so popular fifty or more years ago, and which
considered that the principal office of government ws to perform police
duty. Along certain lines a similar transformation has been witnessed
in our own land
,IS JUSTICE JU^T'/^|
It is well understood that business men'shoul^f&minarize them
selves with the law or laws with Which in the
course of justice they have to do, henoe the old Ifegal axiom that "ig
norance of the law does not excuse." But the court of appeals in re
versing Judge Landis' decision ae&ns to' imply that an exception ought
to have been made in favor of the Standard Oil Company.'^ That is one
main £6aaon ^hy4h|t4eciaion.of^1|ie c§l»t ,is ,i?ri1
Mors will La ndto Agency
oa'e store, Oak street*,and will tw pleased to haraaU wbo
»d our semo«w,
do a gao^yal: jwad aijtd collwition^faMhees. We sotteitoumnt
ooontefB«M «w»iiato^n»nofJw4tertown. Accowits froiu
$ E^&outsWe lo^^i«^ prompt^ hapdledi^KionB or write us.
orswl
Give old as well as new
Postage must be
t-
Main 363
Red 462
gency
,t
Mr
s.
Vf-fe:
-c
SleeplessNights
are easily Remedied. A glass of
Hamm's delicious beer just before re
tiring will bring restful and refresh*
ing slumber.
"Leads Them 'bitt"
Call for the
Preferred Stock
TBEO. HAMM BREWING CO.
st. faul, Mi
H. A. Hildebrant Magr.
Watertown S. D. Phone Main 245
flaflock fcsHevator Digg^J
n$s»f
R't*
V*
The best potato digger on the market,
Guaranteed in every respect. It's com-\
pact, light, simple and durable. Just whatv
the farmer needs who raises potatoes fo£
profit. Two, three or four horses. $80, $85.:^
ID. W. DIXON,s'Agent SKS,
aixjt an
Auto Doctor
p,r^
who knows hdw to overhaul and any every kind
of a gasoline buggy. Specialty in rep«ur work
autos, gas engines, etc. 4^®° horseshoeing.
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