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Saturday news. (Watertown, S.D.) 19??-19??, December 24, 1914, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063549/1914-12-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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WATERTOWN PRINTING AND BINDING 00.
wintered at the Postofflce, Watertown, S. D., as Second Class Matter.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
ONE DOLLAR AND A HALP PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
$2.00 in Canada.
I .. Change in address may be made at any time. Give old as well as
new address.
EDITORIAL
WHERE THE WAR BURDEN MOST HEAVILY PALLS.
It ban been so throughout all human history —it will probably
be so until war is no more.
The great burden of war falls upon labor—upon the industrial
activities of the people—upon the men and women who perform
manual toil.
ip True, the directing minds, and office managers, the heads
great concerns, pay their part, in a way, but they are enabled to
live, to continue their existence, only because they derive their liv
ing from those who till the soil and harvest the crops and convert
the raw materials into tangible forms for the use of man.
The political economists, it is true, and they are right within
limitations, tell us that wealth or money is but the representative of
labor—but the accumulation of labor—but the surplus, or the
profits, after deducting the "cost of maintaining itsdl.
Eliminating what the modern theorists term 'water, and also
Tcertain treasures of the earth represented in fortunate finds
which are not the product of human toil, the political economists
have stated a truth, perhaps, which is in reality but a half truth.
till Labor must live. Tt must have about so much a day to enable
jt to continue its existence. It cannot, stand still and at the same
time survive.
To this extent it differs from so-called capital, particularly
money. While wealth is an accumulation of the profits arising from
labor, and, therefore, a representative of labor, it is distinguished
from labor in that it, needs no continued activity to maintain ltselt.
It does not depend upon industrial conditions for existence. It dc
P^prndfl upon them only for adding to itself, or, in other words, for
further accumulations. We are speaking more especially ot. wealth
in the form of money-HMieh as nations must have to prosecute their
... wars and for the use of which they pledge their resources upon a
basis--,of a stipulated rate of interest.
But, when the war is over, who pays the debts contracted with
tho -accumulated interest and the interest yet to accumulate before
the obligations are strieken from the books?
Labor pays it—all of it—every cent of it. The men and women
'Sjpho toil and,sweat pay it—who toil with their hands and with their
There rti'ly° have been some loss of accumulated wealth through
depression growing out of the war or in the loss of business incident
to the war, but even this loss in the end falls cnJfbor in some form
for tlio accumulation represents but the profits o^Jabor which must
•pecuperate through labor itself.
But the money—the capital—invested in the war assumes only
the risk of utter defeat or annihilation of the nation with whom it
is invested, and to this extent, it may be a gamble, but otherwise it
is assured of its profits. Sr 'uk-
But labors rprofttk ewW^Ufcly a& a secondary conMerat^on and
only after the obligations incurred by war have been Obliterated by
the sweat of the faoei'k.
Labor assumes the gre&t burden Of war and pays war's awful
"-ft" Sv
THE COLORADO STRIKE DECLARED OFF.
The union organization has declared the strike off in Colorado,
aftor liaviag waged it for more than a year,
The strike in Colorado, notwithstanding the conflicting views
promulgated in the public pr^ss with reference to it, in reality
hinges wpon the question of unionism.
The big mine operators, backed by the Rockefeller interests,
•were willing to compromiseupon almost any other proposition ex
cepting that relating to a recognition of the unions as an order
through which it must tre^t in dealing with its individual employees.
Bloodshed, destruction of property, human suffering, resulting
from the strik^, suffering yet to be endured, all rest upon that vital
,- point between capital and labor, so far as it has relation to the sit
nation in Colorado. 'i
/. The result of the election in that state was a blow to the cou
P'feStions of the union, which had hoped that the people of the state
M~. "would nevoid -its side of the dispute. But the violence growing out
of early difficulties connected with the strike seems to have turned
public ^tfttention from the merits of the original controversy to that
the maintenance, of order and the suppression of violence, and in
Hhat aititud^—the attitude of demanding due observance of consti
tuted authority—the people of Colorado, in preponderating numbers,
jsgeiii to hold the unions responsible, within a measure, at least, for
lawlessness that .prevailed within the strike region.
j* Without touching upon the merits of this phase of the question,
St ma jr be said, seemingly without fear of successful contradiction,
that unless the right of labor to unite and speak as-a body for its in
^•dividuat units is recognized, 1n some form, it occurs to us that the
5. laboring man i? doomed to perpetuaLdisadvantage in the economic
fejafftiirs .of %e fiouniax
Wk £$*
We realii'.e that in some^dses laboring men, as*iftdivduaTC, mti
|sj%hapa ,in tV»' collective capacity, have overstepped the bounds of
%ptoprie^r'an^prudence, jet it must be eoneeded that, whore eapital
isfcs arid industrial captains are organized so effectively as they arc
\«^Mtted to be, the laboring man's only hope of meeting this sort
t^im^etitibn lies also in organization for mutual protection.
'fy^ Away out in the midst of an agricultural community like South
where labor unions ate few and far between, and where,
-for the *a»08t part, men work- for themselves in sowin#,and reaping
marketing their crops, there is apt to be a lack of complete
Qptoderstanding of,the true situation in the great labor waters, but
|toinraon r»A§oii suggests that if laboring men organisations are not
recognized as having a right to treat With employers respect
thc iadividuai &nd collective interests of the whole laboring
i«^1$e»J|&e lab^rinfe man interest rests Solely- tipon either
Sumane insets ot thft rapacity nrf the employer, as the oase
*1*,
.'i*.^'-'-
..-i.-,-
SATURDAY NEWS
Published Every Thursday at Watertown, Codington County, South
Dakota, 111 South Oak Street.
aJ-•• Aft A
«NFiMie«li6B6a6F
the Colowdo
mere yt
mmmilfe
ens, mWswMS
miners, then there
when.
FARMERS' CO-OPERATIVE LUTIONS
Iii their annual convention at Aberdeen last week the Farm
ers' Co-operative Association of South Dakota adopted several
aggressive measures involved in questions now before the Amer
ican people.
After thanking the people and the press of^Merl'i-n for the
interest evinced, in the meeting, and endorsing President Wilson's
position with reference to a merchant marine and urging congress
tfr provide for the purchase of vessels to meet our oceau-carrying
trade, and likewise increasing the weight of parcels post, to 100
pounds for the first two zones and to 50 pounds for the longer
hauls, the association committed itself unreservedly to the gov
ernment ownership of railroad and telegraph and telephone lines,
the telegraph and telephone to be operated in connection with the
postoffice department.
Aside from the foregoing, the report of the .committee on
resolutions was as follows:
WHEREAS, the grain exchanges of the several markets
have increased the commission for handling corn one-fourth
cent per bushel, making the price three-fourths cent per
bushel instead of one-iiaif (Ms) cent per bushel, and whereas the
former charge was, in our opinion, larger pay than the elevator
man gets for his services, and the advance was unnecessary to the
economical and successful handling of grain in the terminals and
placing an unjust and unnecessary tax on both the producer
and the consumer, therefore we pronounce the increase a mistake,
register this association as unalterably opposed to it, ami respect
fully request the exchanges to reduce the commission charges on
corn to one-lialf cent per bushel.
WHEREAS, the farmers of this state are paying extremely
high interest rates, and commissions on borrowed capital, and
whereas, our urgent appeal for a co-operative Rural Credit Law
has been unavailing, and all bills pertaining to this matter are
pigeon-holed and sidetracked, we demand that our representa
tives take immediate action on this subject of Rural Credit, or
give a satisfactory explanation of why they are defeating or
delaying this most important legislation.
Resolved That we firmly believe in the justice of our claim
when we demand full* federal inspection and grading of grain
and seeds at the terminal markets.
WHEREAS, there are now pending before the Interstate
Commerce Commission, some eighteen or twenty proposed in
creases in freight rates on grain and other commodities that will
affect the farmers of this state, therefore, be it
Resolved: That we favor an appropriation by our Legisla
ture of the state of South Dakota providing sufficient funds for
the use of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission with which
to investigate the advances in freight rates qf the various rail
roads, that our commissioners may be the better able to protect
our interests in the state as well as before the Interstate Com
merce Commission.
B\ It Resolved: That we recommend our legislature to
pass a law compelling the railroads of the state 'to allow the
elevator and grain companies, at the expense of said elevators,
to install track scales subject to the supervision of the railway
company and to be most conveniently located for the party
installing the same.
Resolved: That we favor a State Hail Insurance law which
will enable the farmers to organize to protect themselves against
the elements at actual cost.
Resolved: That we recommend that our Board of Directors
investigate the advisability, in conjunction with the other states,
of organizing a National Mutual Fire Insurance Company and
report the result of their investigation at the next ajniual meet
ing.
WHEREAS, the ^taxpayers of South Dakota, ate manufac
turing binding twine, through the instrumentality of which the
farmers have got from under the domination of the cordage
trust, therefore, be it
Resolved: That we reeommefid the use of said twine by the"
grain growers of our state.
Be It Resolved: That in view of the great, loss to the farmers
at the various terminal markets, that we should continue our
efforts to secure the erection of terminal elevators with a view of
doing our own terminal marketing and exporting, as is now done
by the farmers of Canada, and that we condemn gambling in
futures as to phantom grain, as it is well known that such
gambling fixes, to a very great extent, the price of oash grain.
Be It Resolved: That we endorse and recommend cO-oper
ation of states and especially by states so associated that the
legislative acts of the one either diipctly or mdiret^ly affects
grading, prices, markets, and generally, the channels of distribu
tion of farm products of other states, and
*Be It*Resolved: That until such time when Federal Inspec
tion, supervision of crop statistics, control of price quotations
and a general supervision and control of the peoples markets,
that we recommend for earnest consideration by our next Legis
lature the appointment by the Governor, of a State Commission
on marketing in general, with authority to conmlt, act fend advise
with any state in all matters relating to the .^air adjustment of
all matters relative t* public markets and thc^istribntion of all
farm produce through an open competitive market system.
r^'
Ltgi*'",°re:
CHAweeRLAiirs couaw remeot
—THKl MOTHER8* FAVORITE.
"I gfre CtamtBeriaia's Cwgft Ee»
edy t« mj sUft«n„wlv» ttoey
cold* «r eduKhs writes MVa. Vtenw
Shattiir. Vandargrttt, Pa. "It always
hfelps them and i« far eupwior to
other cough I
&dTi«p mfoM need ot rich a tam&
tclu« to give It* trlat". For *al»
Seared, Kut No
"*w lpo|c.RC«re^
ctsarse-gsrteftd telto* 1» tti«k rank*
to an 4at«ll|gfint yo«*g ottcer »a the
reciM«int was orderto ch«*e
am ntered," was the frahlt ra
titr. MUf tt wcxrtA
am To* wetrid le on tlw van
i4«jr
F. L. Ryan, Chairman
Chas. Boreson
J. E. Davidson
-.-TO
r»^y-fy
1
Geo. A. Elsom
Geo. T. Green gpl
J. C. Siemann Tig,
C. I. Haywood, Secrfe&wy-
Adopted in convention December 17, 1914.
By resolution it was ordered that a copy of these resolutions
be mailed to each of ket representatives in Congress ana the
JotaT.Bdk,
SecretarpTiSratsarer.
All Out.
Irener Uaft you tbiiilr that Ara-^
el brings out all that is i» "OneT"^
*T«b especially ocean trer
JR
Sbaw iliderUkiyf Co.
^t^NSux.
vmaetom
8HAW,
I*»&• tt. & flp«k «ilMk
Phone
StM
1
A
Ma
r^yg^jfalOTliuei
jwr^s
4
THE SATURDAY NEWS. WATERTOWN, g. P.
V4MiiSi
^wv
DOCTORS.
G. HILL, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Gla»sea Fitted.
First National Bank Building.
DR. W. O.
J. 8. KILBRIDE, M. D.
All calls promptly answered.
General Medicine and Surgery.
Special attention given to diseases ot
the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
Glasses Fitted.
Phone 2448 Office Century Blk.
DENTISTS.
A. O. STUTENROTH, D. D. 8.
DENTAL OFFICES
Over First National Bank
Watertown, 3. D.
DR. LEE P. STUTENROTH
Dentist
Century Building, Kemp Avenue East
Office Phone 2452
LAWY2S8
Geo. W. Case Howard Cat*
CASE & CASE
LAWYER8 .?'
Granite Blook Watertown, '8. O
MISCELLANEOUS
BRICKEIJ^^Cp^T|lUCTION
(CHfllSTS, CONTRACTORS AND
BUILDERS
Plans and Estimates Furnished.
Qffice and shops 114 1st Ave. S. JY.
S Phone 2483 "f'
'U&i* ______
SKINNER'S DRAY, TRANSFER
LINE AND STORAGE
fl JtM 8KINNER, Prepftljt:-
-Offiee 318 East Kemp Avenue
THE NORTHWESTERN HOTEL
Geo. R. Church, Prop,
Rat6a $1.25 per Day Meala 26c
The best hotel of its class in tre city
Cor. 1st St. and 1st Avenue N W
Phone 2230
pi FRANK BENNETT
*tb BAGGAGE AND DRAY LINE
Piano aitd Safe Moving. Storage.
117 2nd St N. SI Phone 22?i
ORDER
mEA
YQUR
VJ..
fP
NEW YOEK DENTISTS
Phone 2075
Leber!
Week.
110 W.
tsswwkm
Transfer Line.
Our Auto Drsy makes Piano Mo*
taf posstbWwWiwttthe aeomitar
is
msmt
tf
w— ,p.
MAOEE
Physician and Surgeon
Office In Stokes Bloc*
Phone: Office, 2408 Res. Phone 2409
Hours, 10 to 12 a. m. to 4 and 7 to
8:30 ». m.
H. J. BARTRON, M. D.
Surgeon In Charge
WATERTOWN 8ANITARIUM
General Surgery Eye, Ear, Nose and
Threat Glasses Fitted.
Office and Residence in Hospital.
Phone 2165.
—r- v„"
THE GREAT JOHNSONS
FROM WALTER TO JACK
A grett year for the Johnson this
—Walter has copped a fat contract
with the Federals—Ban is hitting ne
high places with the American league
—Royal was elected to congress in
our second district by a big majority
—Ed is to go to the United States
senate—Hi is being groomed for tfie
presidency—and Jack has succeeded
in keeping out of the war.—Argus
Leader.
C. C. WHISTLER
Meat Market
CHOICEST MEATS
The Country Affords
Dealer in
Live Stock, Hides, Wool
The Cozy Home
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Calk Answered Day or Night
Day Phone 22B7
Night Phones: T. C. Murphy 3424
E.
S. Larimer 3775.
Electric and Gas
LightingPlants.....
I am prepared to install either
electric or ga« lighting plants in
your home or yonr place of busi
ness.
I make a specialty of installing
eleotric light and gas plants in
farmers homes.
I would be pleased to furnish
estimates of the cost of either
kind of plant. -t.
OSCAR EGGS
723 S. Maple St. Phone Blue 560
Watertown, S.
THE PANITORIUM
A. M. CLARK, Prop£ tp-
J# Pressing #f»
Bepairug
Done as you want it done, when
yon want it.
special Attention to Ladies Work
Phone 2308
We eaU for and d^Uyer-
A
E
COFFEE
SPICES
Extracts, Btddng Powder
GRAND UNION TEA OO.
F. S. Thompson, Agent.
#«?'«S s. b. Watertown, SJ).
CATTLE
POULTRY
O
a. is. to
W
Kemp
Ave.
Watertowly 8. D.
(MBee keura:
8:00
6:"W
p. m.
Sw^tays and Kveaisip by Appoint
kvi wen# 5
CSABB'S CBOOND HAHD
Sgl 8T0RE.
We'lflSadfte ewythln# |na«lnable tit
the Mm of ae^oml hand goede. Many
arttelee aeld ter' one^third of their at
tual value, tt It la to be had we've
Mtoa myimto
fc,
for p«r.
-Stf"
Dr. C. W. Sherfey
W
S-4i
OSTEOPATH—SURGEON' J|
Office in Alexander Block, over
the Suit Shop.
PDMm Offlee 20M. Rea. 41W
Watertown HMe & Nr Co.
WANT HIDES: FURS
Don't sell an Hidet'or Furs tit! you
have sent for our PRICE LISX*
Honest Grading.
reliability.
Absolute AnaQciftl
Send for Catalogue all kinds Furs
You can' bij^ yoUr Furs at v»hol«*U«
here, saving you SO "'Rj1
Come in and look. BuyJrour L«(5i*l,
Men and Children's Fen «t the
factory and tannery-, Get,, the^beft
for your monty* .•$]$
Tusrn of
Hides for Robe$, Coats and Rags
We do *11 all kinds Of T«onin(.
We can please you both ts to quality
of work and price.
WATERTOWN HIDE & fUR CO.
431 w. Kemp Ave,
Watertown, gge'S. D.
California
This Winter
8pend your winter holiday In Cali
fornia this year—you will find it tar
lovelier and more satisfying than Eu
rope.
Don't miss the biggest events of a
lifetime—the Panama-California Expo
sition at San Diego—the Panama-Pa?
ciflc International Exposition at San
Francisco, 1915—and don't miss the
opportunity to see the greatest scenio
sections of the country. Go to Califor
nia via Kock Island Lines. You sea
more and have a wider choice ot
routes at no greater coat
The "Golden 8tate Limited," fore
most transcontinental train, provides
jjvery luxury or modern traVel via the
dlrSet route of lowest altitudes.
Other fast trains daily with choice
of routes—go one way. return another.
Rock bland Scenic
Circle Tours 'to
Pan-Pacific Expositions 1915
Fin**t Modem
AH-Steml EauitmmntP
GIC. Ostrandler
& Son Prop.
TELEPHONE 2087
W. D. MORRM, pres. H. D. SIOX, •. Pres.
LKMB^OMr
Citizens National Bank
Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profit*,
JTOWH, S,
jihead. fib
For tlcketa,reaerra
tlons and Informa
tion see
WM. MITCHELL, Agent
Watertowa, 8. D.
FUEL
JWB
ll^FOR
FOR
Sf-W
HORSES
RANGES
HEATERS
FURNACES
%T'
$10 a Week aivd saves
tter off than he.who earns S20
IP wyyoii 4
4$
W
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itl
s.|
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IP
sr.
wZhrt
Mt-
the ip
ora( |i|
#SSI
clos
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