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Saturday news. (Watertown, S.D.) 19??-19??, February 22, 1917, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063549/1917-02-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Saturday News.
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THE SATURDAY NEWS
Published Every Thursday at Watertown, CtnTrngton County, Sotith
Dakota, 111 South Broadway.
WATERTOWN PRINTING AND BINDING 00.
Entered at the Postoffi.ee, Watertown, S. D., as Second Class Matter.
TEEMS OP SUBSCRIPTION:
ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
$2.00 in Canada.
image in address rnaj be made at any time,
sew address.
E I O I A
Give
WATER THIEVES AND NEWSPAPER SUBSCRIBERS.
Wo don't want to compare the two—far be? it from us—but there is a
phase of the situation in each case that bears a striking resemblance to the
other.
•'•flU'IH
Out in the wilds of Colorado and other portions of the great west where
irrigation is the rule for the growing of crops, it. is not considered a crime—
si moral crime—to steal water from a neighbor's ditch—if it is thought the
act, will not be detected!
Men who go to church regularly, to prayer meeting occasionally, who
tench Bible classes now and then, and otherwise deport themselves as gen
tlemen and scholars, steal other men's water with impunity and seem to
thank God that, they were able to do so—without detection!
"We have sometimes wondered whether a certain proportion of news
paper readers haven't absorbed some of this water spirit of the Golden West.
If it's no crime to abstract a little water, it's no crime to heat the printer,
notwithstanding there are inhibitory statutes in both cases.
As about every newspaper has learned, men will accept a newspaper at
the postofllce, read it diligently or otherwise for several years,—so some of
our exchanges say,—and Anally attempt to evade paying for it on the ground
that they eiLher never subscribed or that they subscribed for a definite
period only.
Let it. be admitted, at the outset, that newspapers should change their
general system of continuing a paper after the subscription for which it was
paid expires. About nine out of every ten newspapers throughout the country
—and every newspaper in Codington county and about ninety-nine out of
every hundred in the state—continue sending to subscribers after an order
is once placed for the paper.
But it is universally admitted that, as a principle of law and equity,
goods delivered to a man and used by him, although the delivery to him may
have been an error, can be collected for.
If a merchant, though through error, the goods not having been spe
cifically ordered, can prove the delivery of certain articles and the use of
the name, the man accepting them and using them, for himself or his fam
ily, is held to be responsible for the worth of the goods consumed, based
upon the usual selling price at the time of delivery. This principle is so
generally admitted that scarcely a sane man can be found who disputes it,
or the justice of it.
The same principle applies to newspaper subscriptions. The man who
accepts a paper year after year, and It can be so proven, is held liable for
the amount of the subscription during the time he has received and accepted
the paper, although his original subscription may have expired long ago.
Wherever this matter has been tested in the courts, the publishers have won,
and without exception, we think.
.Ji The only safeguard, therefore, for the man receiving a paper that he
doesn't wish to pay for, is to refuse to take it from the postofllce. It is the
duty of the postmaster, under the rules and. regulations of the department,
to notify the publisher three different times, and to keep a record of such
notices. ^tter whlcJIi no further responsibility attaches Ho either the post
master or the subscriber. But this does not relieve the subscriber of re
sponsibility up to the date of his refusal to accept it.
It would be Infinitely better for both the public and the newspapers if the
rule applying to merchandising—no delivery excepting/upon a specific order,
with a separate order for each delivery—were applied to newspapers, .It
will be the rule some day. Cash in advance, however, is better still.
The Saturday News does not wish to continue the paper to a subscriber
after he ceaBes to want it, but it has followed the general rule and„ has
continued a subscription that is not definitely ordered discontinued.
If anybody, anywhere, any place, Is receiving a Saturday News that, for
any reason under the sun, he doesn't wish to pay for, and not knowing
whether it is paid for by some one else, he will confer a favor upqo himself
and the publisher if he will so notify the ofllce.
The Saturday News, however, embraces the occasion to congratulate
Itself upon the splendid list of subscribers who have stood by it and are
evincing an interest in the continuation of the paper to their respective
addresses. J*
May the Giver of all that iB worth while in life^contihue' to shower them
with His richest blessings—and vouchsafe them ,tUe privilege of. reading
It may be that the poor are getting poorer but it is not a fact that
the rich are growing richer, for proof of which we cite the instance of the
widow of John Jacob Astor going before the court and testifying that twenty
thousand -dollars a year is not enough for the support of the Astor boy!
Its a wonder that the lad isn't going bare-footed in the cold, cold snow!
An exchange ventures the suggestion that if we get into war with Ger
many, the next president of the United States will be some one who shall
have taken a prominent part in the military operations. While we all rail
against war and the things that lead to war, it is a fact that we have gen
erally regarded our military chieftains as heroes,
One'of the difficulties that is encountered in connection with the situa
tion with Germany is that never before were the submarines used to an
appreciable extent in warfare. This, therefore, is something "new."
t*THE GOOD tlUOGC StES A HOP ON TWOLEOa?
«iuoae. there's THE Biaocsr
TOBACCO H06 ON EARTH
ASKING TOR A CHEW OP
AND POTS HALF A POUC
Wet-— THEN SAYS IT'
•wwoNa.r
old
as
well
WHY HANI THAT® A.WAATB or!
OOOO TOAACCO. CT
W-a 13 RICH TOBACCO ANO A
SMALL CHEW.Ift EMOUtiH FOR I
ANY MAN.' CT-1
DONY HAVE PEOPLE CALLINOl
AHOOJ-
OMp cal^ those {ace-staffers hogs* tome call them
8c*rcer*nd scarcersince
Chewing. Thereis
a monkey ot himself today.
fkh tpbaccoflaoor
was put Into
%rm 41
iff•
W«B by
as
nature*
V+ml+m,. Ot,
THE SATURDAY NEWS, WATERTOWN, S. D.
HOW A SHAKE8PEARE OR MOSES,
The Sioux Falls Argus-Leader seems to be somewhat skeptical about!
the good that is going to follow the adoption of a system for the control of
i*
Karay?4
"PEACE IN THE FALL"
„I8 THING ^0PEDvF0R
SV. .'
That a desperate
1
eugenics, sex hygiene and a lot ot the other late-day fads that are skirmish
ing from ocean to ocean. The following is a paragraph from a recent edit-[ warns A. N. Hume,
orial:
"As for this paper, it believes that the^whole subject of sex
hygiene, of eugenics, of physical examinations as a preliminary to
marriage, of vampire pictures*! at the movies and sex problems in
novels and plays has been arid is being woefully overdone. It is
declared that these things are neccnsary for the proper safeguard
ing of the race and the wonder is thaf any decent people were ever
grown under the old system when- the mother and father discussed
such problems' with their children at the proper time and in the
ffroper way. It may be all right for a young woman to discuss sex
/problems in a mixed company
twith no more embarrassment than
she would talk of the hight cost*of living, but someway we feel that
there would be just as much purity and just as much real knowledge
and that the 3 would be quite as safe, without it."
Of course, it goes -vithout saying that Brother Day is sort o' old
fashioned and that the ."times" are running away from him!
But, all the same, there are a few old-fashioned people to keep him
company, and to wonder how the world, in the absence of all this knowledge
about eugenics, could ever have produced a Lincoln, or a Gladstone, or a
Washington, or a Shakespeare, or a Bacon, or a Milton, or a Caesar, or a
Paul, or a Moses or even a Cain, or a Haman, or a Pontius Pilate, or the
thousand and one other men of fame or notoriety that lived and died before
modern eugenics were thought of.
Of course, the world should progress, it is true, and it does progress
knowledge concerning living and the manner of living is increasing, as it
should increase, and the world is presumably growing better and better
r.nd more and more civilized.
But we should be careful to see that we don't let fads and fancies
supersede common sense that we have really found a new step worth taking
before we take it, and that in our progressing we don't progress backwards.
Until acknowledged and accepted authorities reach a substantial agree
ment, or until the public itself, based upon its experience, is prepared to
say that a given step should be taken, it is dobutful whether it is wise to
rush in where angels fear to tread.
Let us hope that we won't have to fight. Firstly, Uncle Sam hasn't
had to fight anybody across the seas since 1812 secondly, it doesn't pay to
fight thirdly, If we happen to get into a fight we couldn't stop until we had
won.
An article elsewhere in this edition gives considerable information re
garding sugar beet culture—an article which every farmer reader of tni
paper might well peruse.
1
The war will have been over some time before we shall know the exact
situation with respect to the internal affairs of the respective belligerents.
If young Diaz should join forces with Villa, it is not certain that the
Mexican situation will clarify before the close of the European war.
The legislature adjourns week after next.
effort will be
made by the entente allies to "ter
minate the war by the end of the
summer" is the statement of John
Hodge, minister of labor in the Brit
ish cabinet who says that in making
this statement he is not giving away
a secret
To this end, both sides "prepar
ing to make their supreme effort. Ger
many is just tying^to isolate England
and Prance from the rest of the world
that they may be starved into sub
mission. Should Germany succeed in
stopping shipments to England, she
would be compelled to capitulate in a
few weeks. But the "if" is a big one
if we may trust assurances which
come from England. p*|
The entente alliesf%tr tbe other
hand, are about ready for their su
preme effort for which they have been
preparing for 2% years. It is said
for them that they have a supply of
shells and ammunition great enough
to "blow up the world" and that as
soon as the weather permits the big
push will start- The German leaders
say that the entente armies can never
break through the Western line.
If at the end of the coming sum
mer the entente push has failed if
the attempt of Germany to bottle up
England frith a submarine blockade
has not been successful if the mili
tary situation is still at a deadlock
then as now or if the entente have
broken through the German line and
are pounding at the very borders of
Germany in almost any one of these
contingencies the situation would be
ripe for peace. Europe" can not en
dure another winter of the war. The
common people of every belligerent
country recoil at & continuance of the
war into nexl
»And bo, whatever
Iwt is that ^.hilfi the opining sum
mer, will be.bitters* and blooi£
test that the worli has everf' known,
it'wiU bring, ^e^ee at Jts eojl Crip.
Pled and^aniqeftpt
i^eginnipg o&tlfe new. y^ar, Jake^up
"This is the
best Bread
you ever made
"Best, because lightest
and whitest, smoothest
and sweetest."
"I just added a teaspoonful of HO-MAYDE
BREAD IMPRQyER to the water in which the
yeast was dissolved.'^
Bread «et in the morning with HO-MAYDE BREAD
IMPROVER
is
out of the oven by noon. HO-MAYDE
a wholesome product that accelerates the yeast action.
Guaranteed absolutely pure, nutritious and dependable,
complies with the pure food laws.
No sour or chilled bread—no failures—more loaves from
the same materials. If your grocer cannot supply you,
send ISc for a large package, sufficient for 100 loaves. Write
for free sample.
HO-MAYDE PRODUCTS CO., Detroit, Mich.
GET SEED POTATOES
it
STATE ACCREDITED HERDS
FAVORED BY DAIRYMEN
The establishment of state'accredit
ed herds or herds that are certified to
be free from tuberculosis would pro
mote the eradication of the disease
among animals raised in the state
and would promote confidence in the
healtMulness in the dairy herds of
the state. The foregoing proposition
was explained by Dr. J. T. Dinwoodie
of the State College extension divis
ion before the recent state, livestock
association as follows: *°l
The law should provide for the com
pensation or indemnity to owners of
condemned stock based upon its ac
tual value, and sufficient veterinar
ian^ should be employed by the live
stock sanitary board to apply tuber
culin test free and to advise owners in
methods pertaining to disinfection and
cleanup.
Important points in such a law from
the standpoint of herd owners are as
follows:
tfWben a herd is declared free from,
tuberculosis, it is registered by the
state and certificates of immunity is
sued to the owner. These certificates
are recognized by other states, there
fore, a certified animal may be shipr
ped interstate at any time, thus avoid
ing loss of time, uncertainty and fin
ancial expense required by having tu
berculin test applied immediately be
fore shipping. Such a law would pro
mote .standard methods and practices
on livestock farms 'since the animals
woidd be tested regularly at a time
most convenient to the owner and
least harmful to the animal. This
would be far superior to the hit-and
miss method of testing whenever an
animal is sold. The advertising value
and prestige of owning livestock in
a tubercular free state would be of
enfrmotis value.
lending hostilities in other and
more serious forms, We have
de&ded to lead no more Germans and
dance no more Turkey trots.*—Ohio
State Journal. -V
h£f heavy burden of reconduction,
wiib millions ,of brave men less and
bil^n^fpf big .debts mote, wiU» ships
suflt, rfeHroadfe" "Tun factories
out. ol ownmisBiofa,, coital, destroyed,
a^-^4d9wa and or#haiu£ £V6rywhej^
ancTlbe character at Europe w|Q4h^n
Wi#ttt ^o,a8 hard a te&t atp^t
dartii* titer
NOW FOR THIS SEASON
"Gel your seed
WW
*3*
potatoes now,"
agronomist at
State college, who states that the
problem of securing good tubers for
planting next season is likely to he
one of the nfost serious that has con
fronted the state in many years. "It
is an open question," says Dr. Hume,
"whether South Dakota possesses a
sufficient amount of tubers for seed
or not. Whatever the quantity may
prove to be at present either in the
grawers' hands oc elsewhere, the fact
remains that the price of potatoes
before the coming crop is harvested
will be out of sight."
Dr. Hume states that every avail
able source of seed should be drawn
upon with the utmost economy and
offers the following suggestions with
that in view:
If on account of the scarcity of po
tatoes it becomes necessary to utilize
culls for planting, every potato grow
er should keep in mind the years to
come by growing a special breeding
plot from select seed. No great harm
is likely to result in planting culls in
fields where the crop is to be har
vested strictly for market purpose. In
A
sorting out the culls for general
planting, the best tubers may be sel
ected for planting a seed breeding
plot from which the 1918 seed pota
toes may be secured next fall.
It has been demonstrated that va
rieties of potatoes "run out." This
fact was perhaps demonstrated quaa
titively first in South Dakota and pub
lished in bulletin No. 155 of the ex
periment station. This bulletin stateB
that "the average yield from potato
pieces of equal size was 5.55 bushels
per acre higher when select tubers
were used for seed than when culls
were used." Farmers who plan ok
growing potatoes this year should
send for a copy of this bulletin ad
dressing the request to Director, S. I.
Experiment Station, Brookings.
Father (of Mrs. Newlywed): "What
was it your husband wanted to see
me about."
What Is Home Without a Pencil Sharpner
Mrs. Newlywed: "I think he want
ed to borrow a couple of hundred dol
lars from you. The poor boy is anx- 'i
ious to get out of debt."—Boston
Transcript.
For Sale
Meat Meal, Meat Scrap, Poultry Bone Meal,
Blood Meal, Charcoal, Ground Alfalfa, Gluten
Feed, Ground Chicken Ration and Mixed
Whole Grain for Chickens. Digester Tankage
for Hogs. Blatchford's Calf Meal for Calves.
Cotton Seed Meal, Oil Meal,. Shorts, Bran and
Ground Feeds.
Kampeska Milling Co.
When savage racts practice infanti- a
cide, it is because they rate the cost
higher than the return.—W. G. Sum
ner.
Call at Mill i- Phone 2117
Pencil Sharpea®J?&-have become so cheap that
no home in which pencils are used can afford to be
'^hout this little mechanical convenience.
Here's One for a Dollari
Any ordinary-sized pencil can be sharpened:
with it in only a few turns of the crank. It may:
bte placed on the wall or screwed to the top of a
table or desk
We Have No Time to Stop
PLUMBINCff 1HEATIN
and Binding
Company
r^and
talk about the weather or
politics when we are on the
job. We do plumbing work so
reasonably that we have to
work every minute of the time
to come out eveix^^But dont
for a minute think that hurry
means slighting the plumbing.
We are looking for yeiir fur
ther orders too niych to permit
that. How about your first onef
•*f
jm

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