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Saturday news. (Watertown, S.D.) 19??-19??, May 03, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063549/1917-05-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE SATURDAY NEWS
iJublishcd Every Thursday at Watcrtown, Codington County, South
Dakota, 111 South Hroadwny.
WATERTOWN PRINTING AND BINDING CO.
Entered at the Postoflk-e, WaterUnvii, S. J)., as Second Class Mi
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
$2.00 in Canada.
•Change in address may bo made at any time.
new address.
E I O I A
CONSCRIPTION.
ireat Britain learned through bitter experience that to raise an
of sufficient proportions to cope with the militarism of Ger
many, which had been preparing for war for fifty years, conscription
was necessary
It is well that the Hinted States has not waited to duplicate that
experience, hut rather has provided that, inasmuch as an army must
-1
found necessary, not only in our own experience in a
in the experience of other nations.
H'lf llf in t-
During our
and without, warrant: in fact
The Dispatch was commenting on remarks made by a chaplain
.........V.,
1 I l» I
IVIJ
"It is absolutely certain," declares the Dispatch, "that the
sgreat army we must raise will be the result, for the most part, of a
wise and discriminating conscriptive system, a system that will select
the best and fittest men, placing in the ranks of war those best
Adapted to that service and installing in other branches of the na
tional defense service those best qualified to give results there. It
will be upon our selected, conscripted armies that the defense of the
country will »est. It must be so in the end. Is it wise, is it just, is
it true to say that the men thus chosen are less patriotic or will less
merit the grateful reward of an appreciative nation? Why under
take in advance to take the heart and courage and self respect out
of the young men upon whose shoulders eventully will fall the bur
den of universal obligation in obedience to a law which time and
experience will pronounce wise, just and necessary?"
OUR CHILDREN NOT FOR WAR.
kii& ket us make the supreme sacrifice ip this war that will eliminate
militarism.
country, the close of the war, must maintain ti semblance
of militarism, because autocracy shall not have lieen overthrown,
nobody knows what proportion of those school children who marched
4n Tuesday afternoon's parade may be called upon to offer ur their
lives defense of freedom.
It, is the history of autocracy throughout the world that indi
vidual rights and human rights have no place in government. All
must give way to the avarice and the satiate glory of those clothed
"with autocratic power.
st
1 1!?11Sth
ln
peUed
po of Franee
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P0Wef mt°
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FATHER! VOU'lL OET
A
WARMER WELCOME.
THE, BO W-B
IM9TCAD or 4RDIHARV CncwiNI
'y,E.?r STUFr bOHT CO THESE
-am
5 13^
Give old as well as
and wisdom enough in America, coupled
-with that of its allies in Europe, let this war proceed until every
vestige of autocracy shall have been wiped away from the leading
governments of the earth.
^. America, we take it, doesn't want to rear her sons and her daugh
ters lor war. It docsn want to emulate the example of Germany
.or the past fifty years—by compelling its sons to devote a portion of
a est years of their lives to becoming expert in slaying their fel-
rendering neighboring states desolate, as has been
-from which the enemy has been ex-
America assume, is disarmament following the
•ose of this war. Without disarmament the war will have been in
.„ -'".umumciit me vyttr t»ui n»ve oeen
+iW
Wl11
.liave
been a
thlS war t0 the pnd that
0 a
the people and for the people shall not perish.
ft»'eo73!SiSehapS,-anfthose
array offieers
be raised, it is better to proceed along those lines which have been They are abandoning positions commanding salaries ranging from
...A.
gratifying success, Hot­
great hardships endured and sacrifices entailed.
^V?S rnea- therefore, to throw the full weight of its
WOrk llon,t know mueh ab0l,t work
man who is Sent t0 the
can do a 5t
klt(,hen.
^ows,n°thmg abotilt farm work will make
i* wuxiv ij. Jte tnrvwn upon
fawn only when the farmer needs help that Icnows how to help.
&
11
I
1'U. OO Y*»U, aOV. I'VE BECK
WAMTIHft AOWWIimnt NOTAU.
FIAVORIHG AHO fV^KCN HEAMtM
ABOUT THE Wt^SAPT
w'e
«*MAQCor.
iisj'
it f, fe
lllif /I rkl
1 OHO .1 /loir iin -P 4-"U
tne experience oi ouier nations. nrteen to twenty dollr.3 a week, and are getting in place thereof
But we entirely agree, with the St, Paul Dispatch in saying that fifteen dollars a month and board. In other words, in addition to
those who have been berating young men for failing to enlist before risking their lives, they are losing from forty to seventy-five per
conscription goes into effect have been unwise in their conclusions cent, of their Wage.
rill,
IV VUAPIDIU 'WI'UIU LUJANE.IRTI MIUMF.E IN
of a .Minnesota regiment who sought to impress upon his hearers the boys now making who are preparing to serve in the ranks of the
•that nothing but obloquy awaited the soldier who waits for the army.
selective draft.
War, when Ireedom was hanging in the bal- doubt whether his suggestion will be favorably acted upon. With
ance and when the events transpiring and the causes which led to President Wilson's active support, a bill embodying the principle
,,r,*,i™ 4.1,„ might be forced through congress, but unless the president becomes
sponsor for such a proposition we fear there is scant likelihood that
Avar were before the eyes of the people, the remarks of the distin
guished chaplain migh apply with some force, but conditions are now isjiuuBur ior sucn proposition
so vastly different from those of '61 as to furnish no justifiable it will be seriously considered.
grounds upon which to base such assertions as are credited to the We don't know what the maximum allowance for private in
-Minnesotan.
A"1
We«,
are
T,
Lincoln 's immortal
mdicatc.
who talking about
n°te
the
is true. So
Likewise he might be better
A
tWo 3m,ll0n
•tmt in a\S?W be of talking right and preaching right to only acid in SdS
.„av_ intmg office if he keep out of other peoples their talk, wed have had the t\v« million recruits on the wav
JZ' J.
t0 the
teS! ^d.ot.t^ !T°rk,'? thrown upon a *-J th. w?. am glad that you voted for co^riptioi
Aot,, luuiet^tand, that I thmg I owe you especial allegiance, or that
y°ur political fortunes concern me more than do those of other
.• i.^
'CAPITAL" AND THE WAR.
Senator Kenyon of Iowa, in the senate at Washington a few days
since, offered a suggestion in line with that of Hon. John B. Ilanten
of this city, the only difl'ercncc being with reference to the minimum
amount of an ineome a man may be permitted to retain for his own
atter. use during the war.
"I want to say that."' said the senator, "while I am voting for
conscription of men, 1 am going to vote later on for conscription of
great incomes." He added that the government should appropriate
all of an income above .+ 100,000.00.
11 LA I Kt lie cyvinklitha zlette'nitha etaoin shrdlu etaoin etaoin eta
Hut upon capital itself we need waste no sympathy.
not stand to lose a farthing on account of war.
The man who lends the government money for war purposes is
sible repudiation. lie is merely handing his cash, or the use of his
credit, to the government and taking in return therefor gilt-edgecf
bonds, with an assurance that his money will be restored to him
intact, with interest.
But the army recruits of today, and those that the government
will conscript during the ei
iOUl ng two years, are financial losers,
besides assuming all other war risks.
These boys come largely from the ranks of labor in some form
A O A A I
great crisis, but two dollars a day up, many of them drawing wages amounting to
fifteen to twenty dollr.5 a week, and are getting in place thereof
Those enjoying great incomes would be making no greater
•elative financial sacrifice in dividing with the government than are
uiviaiug
WHII
Senator Kenyon is assuredly on the right track, although we
comes should be, but that there should be a limit seems so reasonably
as to be beyond question in the minds of all excepting possibly those
drawing the incomes.
If the boys who are to do the actual fighting are losing half
their incomes, with no prospect for recuperating at the close of the
war save by their respective individual efforts, those basking in thd
sunshine of large incomes should be willing to concede the govern
ment the right to take a considerable portion thereof for the purpose
of helping to win the war.
But whether they are willing or whether they are not, we stand
with Senator Kenyon in the demand that they be compelled to part
with all of it in excess of a reasonable allowance.
"CEASE WRITING AND START FIGHTING."
The Saturday News deems the passage of the conscription bill
a wise thing to do at the very outset of this country's defensive
war.
England tried the volunteer system for a long time, but was
forced to adopt a modified system of conscription in the end.--The
United States would have had similar experience, and it would have
come after a costly period of inactivity.
cons'trained
There's a world of wisdom in that pithy sentence. It expresses
action. It bristles with the spirit of the author's Scotch ancestry.
In this connection we reproduce a personal letter which the
editor of The Saturday News wrote to Mr. Johnson the other day.
because it sets forth the position of this paper in plain terms:
Watcrtown, S. D., April 30, 1917
3 Ion. Royal C. Johnson,
Washington. D.
My Dear Mr. Johnson:
have your favor of the 27th instant. Yes, it seems that The
.Saturday News stands alone among the newspapers of the state, so
tar. as they have expressed themselves, in granting others the right
of personal views. I am sorry that this is the case.
TH'
For my own part, regardless of what I may have thought con
cerning the wisdom of declaring that a state of war exists, which is
equivalent to a declaration of war, I fail to -understand why men in
ft great republic like ours should not be willing to accord other men
the right of individual opinion up to the time when-the majority
declares what shall or shall not be done. After that, of course, in
such a great crisis as this* there slionld be but one
what you say in your letter to Mr. Dunham, as printed in
the press. Although we did not publish his letter to you, we are
going to reproduce a portion of yours to him.
i«Muem wnson nas said, ett^t, that this country needs
President Wilson has said, in effect, that this country needs
imlli .. ._j ... A
men under arms. If those Who have been writing rieht
training grounds! Conscription^would not have been neces-
Tiien, but because it was the propexvCthiiSg to do under the circum
stances.
..With Idndest regArds^ I ain.
The matter of financing the war is a problem that confronts the-, The Aberdeen News, speaking of the prohibition of gambling in
national (ingress.
1'1e
I
Let it be said at the outset that The Saturday News believes that tains views with regard to this matter in line with those held by
assaults upon capital, as such, are neither warranted nor wise. The The Saturday News.
public welfare cannot thereby bg^iibservcd, either during war or at
my other time.
.... bwtuuuinit «v/i. hoi |/uLi'uai a in vavtw win* cquiuaiuit^ tne iiiaxupuiciiiiig oi xne pziccs in tne inter
neurring no hazard whatever, excepting the far-fetched one of pos- ests of men who neither sow nor reap or do anything else save the
iible repudiation. lie is merely handintr his cash, or the use of his securing of a living for themselves at other people's expense.
"Stop the gambling."
„UJ11C
iUllu.
i_l A
me government tnan are
A1.V11J VSXJ. ltd lOO W
-I CU1J J-l till.' l/i. il IL ill) llgll W
1
to call attention to Congressman Royal
C. Johnson closing words in a letter to Mayor Dunham of Clark.
Mr. Dunham had written Mr. Johnson a very caustic epistle. In
concluding his reply, the congressman said, "Let us cease writing
and start fighting."
3
VIEW
as
YOU
if STOP THE GAMBLING."
wheat market at Winnipeg, our northern neighbor, savs, in partp
"The action taken in the Canadian eity is one which
the United States could follow with advantage in
Trading in futures is almost entirely a speculative' prop
osition."
"The difference between what the farmer, the pro
ducer of the wheat, sells his crop for," coninues the paper,
"and that which the grain speculator gets for it, is too
great.'"
•. uuacive uiai wur ^.uui-ueen cumemporniy enteri
We are glad to observe that our Aberdeen contemporary enters
But this paper would not confine the prohibition of gambling in
farm products merely to the period covered by the war. It would
It does prohibit it at all times. jfM
A VI AM ..l« A .^1.1.
The producers encounter too many risks in the raising of grains
to view with equinamity the manipulating of the prices in the inter-
It is too painfully evident that the German submarines are doing
much damage tQ shipping, to say nothing of the human lives lost.
America's proposed one thousand ships cannot be built and brought
into service any too soon.
The News
The Saturday News is distinctively for peace. It never was for
war. But it believes that we should fight in this instance as we have-«----Vri\
never fought before!
If Teddy ever actually told Bill that he (Bill) could lick the^
world,, he (Teddy) is probably now sorry for it.
"Well, we can now preceive what we escaped when he failed to
elect Champ Clark to the presidency.
The
Globe Wernicke
Line
Fills Every
Requirement
You will find a filing
device to suit your needs
—no matter what they are—large
or small—in a finish tofSnatch the
balance of your fixtures. They come in any
number, style or size of units—you can add
new units as needed, if you need them and as
you need them.
Watcrtown Printing & Binding Co
IHKS AND PASTES
v"U'
time.
1 1 1
Theodore Roosevelt is one of the most patriotic of American
citizens. It doesn't make any difference whether you admire Mr."
Roosevelt or whether you do not, you must admit that Mr. Wilson is
now doing what you were obviously afraid that Roosevelt would do
if you elected him instead of Wilson to the presidency. Mr. Roose
velt is now one of the warmest supporters the president has in the
United States.
*U:
For COMMERCIAL
PRINTING
and ADVERTISING
I
Are Your FiliENelds
fiLir 'W 1111 nv
Large or Small:
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