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The Warner sun. (Warner, Brown Co., Dakota [S.D.]) 1885-1???, August 24, 1888, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2001063565/1888-08-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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VoL 5. No. 52.
The Bottom Price Store i
Dry Goods, Clothing, Notions, Hats and Caps
Boots and Shoes, Groceries, Crockery,
Glassware, Stoneware, Hardware,
Tinware, Stoves, Nails, Paints,
Brushes, Oils, Glass,
Putty, etc., etc.
You are Invited to Examine Goods and Prices.
:D- F. Collins,
WARNER, DAKOTA.
WILLIAM GARDNER,
MANUF’R AND DEALER IN
Harness, Saddles, Whips Robes, Etc.
HOME MANUFACTURED COLLARS A BPECIALLTY.
ALL umm OF REPAIRING RONE NEATLY and PROMPTLY!
MAIN STREET,
I Still To The Front!
With the Finest and Cheapest Line of
Clothing and lients Furnishings
- West of Chicago. Call on us when in need of Anything an our
line and we will guarantee to give you good satisfaction.
i IHKCIIC/.POSQUAAE DBAUMGCLOTHIO HOUA
ABERDEEN, DAKOTA.
Charles Appell, Proprietor.
- - C. L SEAMAN, ■ -
—KEEPS A COMPLETE STOCK OF—
" t'tt
Hardware, Stoves, Tinware
Paints, Oils, Glass, Cutleiy, Etc.
At as any in Central Dakota.
• ty/x-NER, - - DAKOTA.
The St Croix Lumber Company,
. inter ai all Ms of Biig Material
FULL ASSORTMENT CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
[ '
. ggye you Money* Give Us a Call and See*
I -FT"'' T L. a TURNER, MANAGER,
WARNKR. DAKOTA*
■fit.
k.:..x & £Wmi
■ •
ft BUY YOUR
M . -
ml JLJI »■ w
if AT THE
ilPlf ~>
• .'V'- ■'<
: -
Wututt
WARNER, DAK.
Warner, Brown Co., Dakota, Friday, August 24, 1888.
Entered at the Warner, Dak., postofUee u
•econd-claaa mail matter.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF IIBOWS COUNTY
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
For President—
BENJAMIN HARRISON,
of Indiana.
For Vicepresident—
LEVI P. MORTON,
of New York.
The republican convention now in
session at Watertown is the largest
political gathering ever held in the
territory, nearly five hundred dele
gate* being present in person. Cen
tral Dakota organized Wednesday
morning and captured the prelimin
ary organization after the hardest
and closest battle known in territorial
politics. At the present writing it is
impossible to predict with accuracy
who the nominee will be, but it can
safely be said that no one can be nom
inated without the consent of Central
Dakota, which stands solid except
Edmunds, McPherson, Potter and
Walworih counties, who want to be
with the “band-wagon” and think the
vehicle is being driven by Mr. Gifford.
That gentleman has more delegates
than any other candidate before the
convention, but, as we said before, he
cannot*be nominated without the con
sent of that portion of Central Dakota
that has displayed sufficient back
bone to assert its individuality.
Melvin E. Stone, editor of the
Chicago News, which supported
Cleveland in 1884, is nowon a visit
to Ireland and writes a$ follows to
bis paper concerning the manufactur
ing interests of that country. More
covincing argument, that of actual
demonstration, cannot be produced.
“Of all places I have ever visited I
think this town abounds in people of
high spirits, cheerful dispositions, and
Urge intelligence. I do not mean,
of course, the lower classes, nor the
higher, but the middle. There are
splendid scholars here —public, re
ligious and private—and the percent
age of illiteracy is said to be smaller
in and around Clonmel than in any
district of proportionate population
in the south of Ireland. There is
one very sad feature about the town,
and that struck me before I had been
here a day. I have never seen so
may silent factories. There are great
buildings along the quays, immense
structures on the back streets, build
ings rising to six stories in the rear
of private houses, all vacant. They
tell roe here that previous to the
union the linen and woolen factories
of Clonmel gave employment to
15,000 or 30,000 people. The entire
population of the town now does not
amount to over 10,000. It was one of
the busiest towns in the three king
doms; no*-, sc far as manufactories
are concerned it is one of the dullest.
Inimical legislation on the part of
England drove one after another of
the great mill owners put of business,
to emigration or poverty. before
the union Irish industries were pro
tected and fostered by the Irish par
liament. The country was pros
perous, if discontented. After the
union foreign competition came in
and silenced the mills and factories.
Whatever it may have done for other
countries, or however wise it may be
to remove the protective tariff in thj
United States, Ireland stands to-day
a terible example of the workings of
free trade.”
Prices Under a Protective Tariff.
The attorneys for free trade, who
seek to create prejudice against the
policy of protection by charging that
it enhances the cost to consumers,
can best be met by a comparison of
prices of a few articles in common
use. *
In 1860 salt, then on the free list,
sold to consumers at an average
prlc. . f. li rr
between this price and that paid by
consumers wentfortransportation and
profits of middlemen.
The manufacture of plate glass
was established in tß6ft when the
foreign-made article sold ior $2.50
per square foot. The tariff on a
similar quality of glass is now 50
cents per foot, and the price has
steadily lowered until it is now 75
cents per square foot.
Pig iron, in IS6O, sold for $22.75
per ton. With a tariff of $6.75 per
ton, it now sells for $lB.
Steel rails were first made here in
1867, when the price was $ 166 per
ton. The tariff has been as high
as S2B per ton, and is now sl7.
Steel rails are now quoted at s3l,
and have sometimes been lower.
A favorite plea of free traders is
that with wool and woolens on the
free list ‘'the poor man’s blankets"
would be sold for one-haW its pres
ent price—when the fact is prices
for blankets of equal quality ate
about the same in the United States
and England. Here is the proof.
Last year the secretary of war in
vited bids for supplying army
blankets at four pounds weight, and
allowed foreigners to complete on
the same terms as American manu
facturers, that is, without paying the
tariff. The lowest British bid was
only thirty cents per blanket less than
that of an American. The tariff, if
it had been charged, would be
about 81.50. Our free trade cabi
nent officers gave the contract to
the foreigner who pays no taxes
and buys nothing in this country,
instead of favoring the American,
who supplies work to hundreds of
people and otherwise adds to the
wealth of our country. The money
from our national treasury went to
a foreign country, and American
soldiers are to sleep under British
blankets, because they can be maue
in England for thirty cents less than
in this coublry.
Ar.d there is'seme testimony from
the other side: Matthew Arnold,
the eminent English scholar, states
man and free trade advocate,
recently deceased, last year made a
tour to this country', and afterwards
gave his conclusion in the Nine
teenth Century Magazine, (April,
1888.) In this paper the writer ad
mits that conditions in the United
States are favorable to “that im
mense class of people" whose in
comes are less than ${,500 a year,
while in England the advantage “is
greatly in favor of those with in
comes above that sum. Of wages
he says, “the humbler kind of work
is better paid in America than with
us, the higher kind worse. Luxur
ies are, as l have said, very dear —
above all, European luxuries; but a
working-man’s clothing is nearly as
cheap as in England, and plain food
is on the whole cheaper.
SOUTH CENTRAL
DAKOTA FAIR
AT COLUMBIA,
SEP 18. 19 A 20. 1888.
’ 9 ’ •’ • Sf
Magnificent Premiums Open to All.
$250 on Cattle.
$350 on Horses.
SSOO on Sheep,
Swine, Farm and Household Pro
ducts.
Speed Pra»i<™«. «50
Special premiums 300 and upward.
$35 for best exhibit from one
township of grains, grass and vege
tables. Grain and grass to be in
bundle with roots attached.
Address by HON. A. B. MORSE,
member of the Supreme Court of
Michigan.
Write for Premium List to
F- H- Townsend, Secretary.
Jay Jennings,
DENnSTIJ
Truth Extracthd Withow w»,
'1 Gil BFRT
I I witl ?A\akv jk> u a l>ouu at ten p€i
THE SUN.
yon
TUK CAM PAIGN OF IHMN.
Tho Great Demoerutle und
lnduiMMulent Nowmjhiihsi’.
Thk Sun can afford to be independent,
for its Democracy is sound to the core.
That is why Tim Huh, with the truest
loyalty to Democratic pHndpto# and the
Democratic cause, is accustomed to apeak
out its honest convictions with absolute
fearlessness and in language that can be
understood.
Thrs TH* Sox is the People’s News
paper.
From now until November brings the
triumph of the United Democracy and
the election of the Democracy's candi
dates,
CLEVELAND and THURMAN-
Thk Key will print the most truthful,
instructive, impartial, and entertaining
history of the campaign of 1888. Its
ample resources enable It to ge.t all the
facts, and to present them in inenmpur
able compact and interesting style; while
a good-nutmed philosophy and a tolerant
hibit of view in the minor affairs of man
kind do not check its earnertuess in
woraing with all its heart for the cause
of honest government, to l>« ensured by
the lasting prevalence of the political
ideas held by Jefferson, Jackson, ami
Tilden.
Thij Bcir has six, eight, twelve, six
teen, and twenty jMges, as occasion re
quires, and is ahrad of all competition In
everything that makes tt newspaper
worth rending.
Daily, ja*r month $0 HO
Daily, jier year (> 00
Sunday, p-r year 2 00
Daily and Sunday, jhji- year.... ... 8 00
Daily and Sunday, per month 0 70
Weekly Sun, one year 1 00
Address THE New York.
JOHNSON’S
Universal Cyclopedia.;
Is it whole library of universal ksew j
ledge from tho )>ens of tho ablest schol
ars in America and Europe. It i.s ac
cepted as high authority in our leading
colleges. It is not for the few, like
Appleton’s, the Rritannica, or the
“International,” but for nil. It has
just been thoroughly revised at a cost
of over SOO,OOO, and three years’ labor
by forty editors, and over 2,000 renown
ed contributors. It is in eight eovenient
sized volumes. No father can give to
his child at school or his son or
daughter just entering the arena of life
anything that will be of more per
manent benefit. It is aa education
supplementary > that of the schools.
iW Men Wanted.
Address for particulars, terms, and
circulars.
A. J. JOHNSON & CO.,
11 Great Jones hi
NEW YORK,
/MiimimLlJ
H
Fast Mail Line with Yes tlbided j
trains between Chicago, Milwau
kee, St. Paul and Minneapolis.
Trans-Continental Route be
tween Chicago, Council Bluffs,
Omaha and the Pacific Coast
Great National Route between
Chicago, Kansas City and St.
Joseph, Mo.
6700 miles Of Road reaching all
principal points in Illinois, Wiscon
sin. Minnesota, lowa, Missouri and
Dakota.
:■ .
For MAI’S, time tables, rate of pass
age and freigtt, etc., apply to the nearest
station agent of th« Chicago, Milwau
kee ft Sf I’acl Railway, or to any
Railroad Agent anywhere in the World.
ROSW ELL MILLER, AvY, H. OAKI'ENTEU,
Ccoira! Manager, Owl F*i>. and Tkt •Agt
par For information in reference to
Lands and Towns owned bv the Chi
cago, Milwaukee & St. Pace Rail
wav Comi’AN v, write to It. G llai ges ,
Land Commissioner, Milwaukee, Wis
consin
W. L STEERE,
Notary Public 8 Land
Attorney,
One hundred thousand dollars to loan
upon improved farm and city property.
Large loans at lowest rates. Applications
mode tree. Ayply uo where else before
eeeiugme. I. bTEKRK, llondellG
I c. J. U. MACLEOD
I TfimimtifiA 'fi'ann T nfma
Notary Public, I
$1.50 Pe
THE BEST OF ALL.
THE WEEKLY
PIONEER PBESS.
If you want all I he iifws *«hseribo for t!.*/ 5;
Weekly Kieancu Pm».
Six Months for 40 Cent
Ukmkmuek, this is a Svkcial Offer,
and will hold good only till August loth.^
The Weekly Pioneer Press J
Contains the most reliable. -jjj&SpS
POLITICAL NEW3*
THK
BEST EDITORIALS,
The greatest
G. A. R. DEPARTMENT,
And more attractive features f»>e tfco-o,
old and young than any other weekly .- 1
paper in the West.
Send 441 cents to the Pioneer
Co., St. Paul, Minu., and receive
great weekly for six months. fi
One Dollar jv-il secure the Weel-lv I
Pioneer Press for one year, together ]
with a splendid History of the Coiled 1 f
Suites.
THE CHICAGO*" 0 I
NORTH-
Wi SffSSri** 'M
W»JS* *
Penetrates the Centers of
Population in
ILLINOIS, IOWA.
WISCONSIN.
MINN KSOT A ..JgM
dakotIMMM
NEBRASKA AND WYOMING m
Its Train Skrv Ick i* carefully arrange*)' If
to meet requirements or local trave;, jia j
well os to furnish the niosi attr#«tiv<*yiSl
routes for through travel between liri
{Kirtaut
TRAD* CKNTKUB. |
Its Kquip.mk.vt of Dny and Parlor Or*, i
Dining ami Palat e Sleeping Curs is with
out rival.
Its Roar Bki> is jwrfectlon, ot stone tml
lasted steel.
The Nouth-Wkstkhn is the favorite '"•£
route for the commercial traveller, the
tourist and the seekers alter new botnet* ;;
in the Golden Northwest
Detailed information cheerfully fur- v
uished by
Lightning !
PRO TEC7 YO UR HOMES ANOmk
FAMILIES FROM
STRUCT ION WITH A
Stir Copper Covered*
Lightning Rod. Sgl
This rod is the veif®!
best# in the entire £
northwest and
guaranteed to givJJ
entire satisfaction. M
H. C. HARTSOK, Agent!
■ IStm
Warner, Dak* " '‘Matt
LIVERY, FEED and SALE j
»T AULK.
E. L. 3UNGERI.AND, PKot- R ‘
1
%. T TACBHAN , ll.lt porri it.
TAUBMAN A POTTEi 1

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