OCR Interpretation


The Seward gateway. (Seward, Alaska) 1914-1917, October 12, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2008058232/1916-10-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Great ™® ®
ALASKAN ALA5KAN
L-- pitot ishfti T>All Y FYPFPT SUNDAY LARGEST ALASKAN CIRCULATION
ADVERTISEMENTS BRING RESULTS PUBLISHED DAILY EXCEPi SUNiJAi_____—
SEWARD, ALASKA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1916 Ten Cents the Copy
^ ol. 10, No. 2<9 _ _______—
BERLIN REPORTS SECOND ARMY
OF ROUMANIA BEING SMASHED
ORDERS SHIPS TO REMAIN
\E\\ YORK, Oct. 12.—it is reported that the com
mander of British tied in Halifax lias ordered all British
stops in American ports to remain there for the present.
It is now believed that the story ot the sinking ot the
Kingstonian was an error, loday experts are expressing
m tne newspapers their perplexity because of the sudden
cessation ot the attacks on snipping by the l -o3. No one
seems to have got the slightest inkling as to whethei the
submarine is still hovering around or has gone back acioss
the Atlantic. .. __
KANSAN STAYS AT HOME
BOSTON, Oct. 12. — The ship Kansan which has a
cargo valued at half a million dollars toi St. Nazaiie,
France, has decided not to sail and take chances ot being
sunk by a German submarine. The cargo is made up of
munitions of war and the sinking would probably be re
garded as legal.
ANN 1HILATE ROUMANIANS
BERLIN. Oct 12. — By irresistible attacks General
Falkenhayn is now rapidly annihilating the second Ron
manian army of the 1 raiisylvanian invasion. At Sinka
river they have been defeated decisively and are now flee
ing into the Alt valley with our troops following relent
lessly. At the same time the Bavarian army under Gen
eral Kraft has taken possession ol Red lower pass and is
making ready for the invasion of Northern Roumania.
The plan of campaign now seems to be a simultaneous at
tack by the Bulgars and Germans from Dobrudja across
the Danube and by the Germans on the northern frontier
iu the effort to squeeze in from both sides and eliminate
Roumania entirely if possible.
ROUMANIANS FIGHT ANI) FALL BACK
BUCHAREST, Oct. 12.—The Roumanians are retir
ing near Kronstadt, it is officially admitted, but in good
order and thev have repulsed several attacks on their rear
while continuing the retreat. South of the city our troops
have inflicted heavy losses on the enemy. It is not denied
that the invasion of Transylvania has practically come to
an end but the physical conditions on the border make a
defense against invasion of this country comparatively
easv.
%
GRABS GREEK FLEET
LONDON. Oct. 12.—Admiral Dufornet, commander
of the Anglo-French fleet in the Mediterranean, demand
ed the surrender of the whole Greek fleet yesterday and
also demanded the disarmament of the forts and ships at
Lemnos and Kilkis to make sure that the allied forces will
remain in control at Piraeus without danger of attack.
The allied general has also taken over the Lemnos rail
road and other precautionary measures have been taken
to safeguard our positions in Greece and the Balkans gen
erally.
%
FRENCH GAIN ON SOMME
PARIS, Oct. 12—It is officially announced today that
our troops made important gains south of the Somme last
night and captured fifteen hundred Germans in the as
saults. For the hirst time for several months fighting has
been renewed in the department of the \ osges. \ iolent
artillery duelling is proceeding there and the Germans
have been repulsed at Sehoenhatzen with heavy losses.
Military experts are at a loss to understand why the
Teutons have resumed activities in that region.
HAIG SAYS ALL QUIET
LONDON, Oct. 12.—General Haig reports that con
ditions on the Somme front are quiet and that no import
ant engagement was fought yesterday by his command.
Five raids were made on Messines, he reports.
BRITISH GAIN IN SOUTH
SALONIKA Oct. 12.—The British are still gaining on
■ the Struma river in Macedonia and have occupied Papa
lova and Prosenik. In that quarter the British have
brought their cavalry into action again and by that means
are able to advance faster than would be possible other
wise.
ITALIANS RESUME OFFENSIVE
LONDON, Oct. 12.—The Italians yesterday resumed
the Trieste offensive and broke the Austrian lines between
Lobar and Yertobia, taking six thousand prisoners. The
slowness of the advance is due to the fact that the front
in that region is confined and the Austrians are able to use
a comparatively small force for the defense.
SCORES Of DEAD TO
Bt tXIHIMtl) MtRt
Just as soon us the new cemetery
is platted and made ready the work
ot‘ exhuming and reburying the bodies
from all the other local graveyards will
be carried out. Mayor Myers said to
day that tile new cemetery must be
made ready before the snow dies and
he states it to be the intention to ex
hume every body now buried in the
live other places. It is estimated that
over a hundred people have been
buried in tile neighborhood of the city
so that the work of exhuming will be
a big one and rather a gruesome one.
The work on the new cemetery is now
proceeding.
HUGHES REFUSES TO SAY
WHETHER HE IS GERMAN
F1KESV1LLE, N. Y., Oct. 12.—
Judge Hughes has refused while here
to state whether or not he represents
the German-Ameriean vote. The
question was asked of him several
times.
i
NEW LABOR PAPER
The Alaska Labor News is the name
of a new paper which has just been
established at Anchorage. A copy of
the second issue has reached the
Gateway and it appears to be a very
good paper of its kind. It denies edi
torially that it is controlled by the
Socialists but admits its editorial
staff is Socialist. A paper like the
Alaska Labor News can do good if
conducted in a conservative manner.
It looks as if the reverse could not be
true of the new publication.
SEATTLE STILL DOING
BIG LIQUOR BUSINESS
SEATTLE, Oct. 12. — The Dry
Squad has made an estimate that a
liquor traffic of a million and a half
dollars has been carried on in this city
during the past five months.
BEVERIDGE IN SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Oct. 12.—Senator Bev
i ridge will speak here tonight as part
of the presidential campaign.
WILSON NAMES MEN
FOR NAIL. DEFENSE
HARRISBURG, Oct. 12. —While
enroute to Indianapolis President
Wilson yesterday named the members
of the advisory commission on nation
al defense. The members of the com
mission are Daniel Willard, Samuel
Gompers, Dr. Franklin Martin, of
Chicago, Howard Collin of Detroit,
Bernard Baruch of New York, Dr.
Hollis Godfrey of Philadelphia, Juli
us Rosenwald of Chicago.
ALASKA JAP TO
C,FT HIS FREEDOM
WASHINGTON, Oct. 4. —If Shun
Shimada, a Japanese serving a life
sentence for murder committed in Al
aska, will agree to return to Japan
and never visit America again, Presi
dent Wilson has agreed to order his
release from the federal penitentiary.
Shimada’s friends urged clemency
in his behalf owing to the fact that
he is suffering from tuberculosis.—Ex
MAD KING OF BAVARIA
DIES IN HIS CASTLE
COPENHAGEN, Oct. 12. — King
Otto, the mad king of Bavaria, died
yesterday in his castle of Fuersten
ried.
GIRLS PAINT LEGS
ORDER TO AVOID LAW
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Oct. 1.—
Bathing girls appeared here today in
new style stockings, consisting of
stripes of black paint, applied either
laterally or longitudinally, as the
wearer wished, to achieve the appear
ance of slimness or plumpness.
The girls are perfectly satisfied
with the contour of their legs, but the
authorities have msisted that stock
ings must be worn on the beach.
The life guards confessed that they
were deceived by the new ruse. Only
one of the girls with painted hosiery
ventured into the surf. Before she
was knee deep in the surf the colors
began to run. Rather than resemble
an Easter egg, she ran, too.—Ex.
ANOTHER SON COMES
TO MRS. J. J. FINNEGAN
A son was born to Mrs. J. J. Fin
negan last night about 11 o’clock at
Seward General Hospital. Dr. Baugh
man was in attendance. Mother and
son are doing finely.
NEW GERMAN LOAN COMING
BERLIN, Oct. 12.—A bill will soon be introduced in
the Reichstag for a three billion dollar war loan to be
floated in spring.
NOT TO USE SUBMARINES
NEW YORK, Oct. 12.—Bernstorff and Gerard, two
ambassadors, conferred for a long time yesterday after
noon and the German ambassador authorized the state
ment that Germany does not contemplate the resumption
of submarine warfare. He says Germany intends to keep
its promise to the United States in this respect. United
States ships arriving today report that neither Entente
warships nor German submarines were seen by them.
WHAT GERMANS WILL DO
WASHINGTON, Oct. 12. — Diplomats here believe
that Germany will grant the United States demands in re
lation to submarining ships near the American coast but
that Germany will insist on the right to operate submar
ines on the routes of ocean steamships far out to sea.
GERARD DENIES AGAIN
NEW YORK, Oct. 12. — Ambassador Gerard denied
positively today that he brought any message from the
kaiser to the president touching on peace proposals in the
slightest.
j , '
DESPERATE FIGHTING
PARIS, Oct. 12.—The Bulgars are now desperately
fighting the French and Serbs just south of Monastir but
the allied forces are gradually forging ahead and Mona
i stir appears to be closer and closer every day to capture.
(
BOSTON WINS FOUR OAMES AND
WORLD SERIES FROM BROOKLYN
RESTORE MATANUSKA
LANDS TO ENTRY

President Wilson has restored four
sections of land in the Matanuska
valley to entry ami notice of the fact
has just been recived by Manager
Christensen of the land department of
the engineering commission. Kach
section is (>40 acres so that the total
amount restored is slightly over twen
ty-five hundred acres. It is mostly
agricultural land.

SCHOFIELD EXPECTED
AT END OF MONTH
George D. Schofield, the regular
Republican candidate for attorney
general, is expected to arrive here in
the latter part of this month when he
will make a speech in furtherance of
his campaign. He is expected to wind
up his campaign in Anchorage.
Charles Sulzer, Democratic candidate
for congress, will also probably arrive
soon to address the Seward people.
Rainier Buffet to
Change Location
Messrs. -McPhail and McKenzie
have made arrangements to move the
Rainier Duffel to the Ashland build
ing, opposite the U. S. Commission
er’s office. The building will be re
modelled first and made one of the
finest houses in the territory. The
Buffet is now in tile Louvre building
and has been there aince the fire de
stroyed their old place after they
had been located there only a short
time. The work of remodelling the
new building will begin as soon as
possible.
ANOTHER STRIKE IS
REPORTED AT NOME
The Nome Nugget of the sixteenth
of September reports a new slnw ?
thus:
What is said to be a strike of some
magnitude has been made by Jensen
and son on the second bench line a
short distance below Fort Davis, ac
cording to reliable reports reaching
town yesterday afternoon.
From the statement of those who
are aware of the circumstances, the
ground is located about three-fourths
of a mile from the military post and
in the near vicinity of the place which
attracted some attention as a produc
ing section six or eight years ago.
The Jensen’s are reported to have
located the pay at a depth of eighteen
or twenty feet. The amount of devel
opment work so far accomplished is
slight but is said to be sufiicient to
show that the strike is of more than
passing value. The paystreak is
about two feet in thickness and is said
to carry exceptional values. Accord
ing to the statement of one party,
pans as high as six and seven dollars
are by no means unusual and the
average is out of the ordinary. A
number of parties are reported to
have left for the new discovery this
morning in the hope of picking up a
continuation of the pay.
WHITE PASS ENDS
A BUSY SEASON
The White Pass & Yukon Route
will this week send its last boats down
the river from White Horse, thus end
ing the most successful year the com
pany has enjoyed since the days of
the Klondike. The railroad and stage
route from Skagway to White Horse
| will be kept up and operated through
out the winter.—$x.
Boston won the fifth game of the
series which was played today, so get
ting four wins to her credit and with
it the World’s championship for the
year 11)16. The game was won today
by a score of 4 to 1. The victory of
Boston was the vindication of the
opinion of the fans who picked her
from the beginning.
LIN H I P
Itrook I \ n—
Johnson—m.
Daubert—lb.
Stengel—r.
Wheat—i.
Cutshaw—2b.
Mowery—2b.
Olsen—ss.
Meyers—c.
Pfeffer and Dell—p.
Boston—
Hooper—r.
Janvrin—21).
Walker—m.
Hoblitzel—lb.
Lewis—I.
Gardner -2b.
Scott—ss.
Cady—c.
Shore—p.
First Inning—
Both teams failed to score.
Second Inning—
Brooklyn: Cutshaw walked and
Mowery sacrificed him to second.
Olsen and Myers go out but Cutshaw
advances to third and scores a minute
later on a passed ball by Cady.
No hits, one run.
Boston: Hoblitzel goes out. Lewis
hits to left field for three bases and
, scores on Gardner’s sacrifice. Scott
^ goes out.
1 hit, 1 run.
Third Inning—
Brooklyn unable to score,
i Boston also fails to cross the plate.
Fourth Inning—
Both teams again fail to score.
Fifth Inning—
Brooklyn got its first hit of the
game in this inning, Myei making a
I scratch hit.
No runs.
Boston: Hooper singles and scores
when Janvrin hits for two buses.
1 run, 2 hits.
Sixth Inning—
No scores by either team.
Seventh Inning—
Brooklyn: Mowery singles, which
is Brooklyn’s first clean hit of the
game; gets to third but fails to reach
home.
Boston unable to score in this inn
ing.
Fighth Inning—
Brooklyn: Merkle batting for Pf**f
fer flies out to Lewis. Myers and
Daubert go out.
Boston. Dell replaces Pfeifer in the
box for Brooklyn. Janvrin singles on
the first ball pitched. Gardner sacri
fices Janvrin to second. Hoblitzel and
Lewis fly out to Wheat.
Ninth Inning—
Boston: Stengel singles. Wheat
fans. Janvrin retires Cutshaw and
Mowery and the game ends.
Boston wins the game 4 to 1 and
the championship of the world for
1916, defeating Brooklyn 4 games out
of 5.
BATTLE AT BAYONNE
AND LIVES ARE LOST
BAYONNE, N. J., Oct. 12. — The,
police tired on the mobs of strikers (
here last night and at least three lives,
were taken. A state of terror reigned
all day yesterday when the strikers
attacked Policeman O’Connor on the;
Lehigh railroad and after they'
thought him dead threw his body on
the tracks in front of a train. Last j
night it was reported that two police
men and two strikers were dying and j
soon afterwards rioting started again.
The mob was attacked by a force of
fifty police who decided it was neces-:
sary to use their guns. At the first
volley a woman spectator who was •
looking out of the window of her home
was fatally wounded. Two men are j
reported to have been fatally wound-;
ed in that attack also but the mob
was finally dispersed by the police.
Three thousand of the employees of
Standard Oil are out.
THIRTY SHOT
11 — —
BAYONNE. Oct. 12. — Thirty poo- j
pie were shot in the rioting yesterday,
it was learned this afternoon, and
conditions are still most threatening.
The strikers have gained possession of
the Hook district and are ruling it as
would an invading force in real war.;
One of the most reckless actions of I
the strikers was to burn down a i
saloon building because they saw the
proprietor talking to a strike Breaker j
in a manner that suggested a confer-1
rence on matters relating to the
strike.
Gabriel Santos, who formerly con
ducted a restaurant here, is visiting
the city again for a while. He has
been in the Talkeetna country.
The reception to Rev. Mr. and Mrs.
Patton will be on Friday evening, not
Friday afternoon.
1
Splendid Program
Saturday Evening
A splendid and original program is
about completed for the A. B. vaude
ville show on Saturday evening. Mrs.
E. E. Wright will play a violin solo.
Miss Lucille Hallett will give au ex
hibition of esthetic dances, which will
be something altogether new in Al
aska. Mrs. Christensen will render a
vocal solo, as will also Mrs. Sawyer.
Johnny Kacerosky will uphold the
comic end of the program, and Bryce
Howard and what Frank Ennis calls
“charming young ladies” will form a
most delightful chorus. Some of the
ladies iii this chorus will be the Misses
Romig and Mrs. Bigford. The affair
is now advanced far enough to give
assurance that the evening will be one
of unusual pleasure.
Russians Accuse Foes
Of Poisoning Food
PETROGRAD. Oct. 12. — It is an
nounced that enemy fliers are now
dropping poisoned food on Constanza
in Dobrudja in the hope that the in
habitants will eat it.
NORTHWESTERN COMING
The Northwestern left Juneau at 3
p. m. yesterday.
James Drennan, one of the lessees
of the K. A. G. mine, is visiting in the
city.
Jim Hamilton has come back to the
city from the Skeen-Lechner mine.

xml | txt