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The American issue. [volume] (Westerville, Ohio) 1912-19??, March 15, 1912, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2008060406/1912-03-15/ed-1/seq-5/

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Speaking of Taxes and Taxpayers
The brewery agents who are working for the return of saloons to our “dry” towns have a good deal
to say about taxes. It would be interesting to scan the “wet” petition in your town and not how many
taxpapers have signed it. This hue-and-cry about no-license increasing taxes doesn’t come from the
fellows who are paying the taxes. The probabilities are that their tax receipts show a decrease rather
than an increase.
The tax-books of Carbondale, “dry” since 1908,—show some interesting facts in connection with
the “wet” petition.
IN CARBONDALE.
The “wet” petition was signed by 376 citizens.
Among these 376 there are but ninety-five taxpayers paying taxes in 1911.
The total of taxes for 1911 is over $53,000.
These ninety-five are paying a total of $1,115.95 °f this amount less than three percent, distributed
as follows:
Sixty-five white citizens (city residents). $7168?
Twenty-three colored citizens (city residents). ttoT.
Seven white farmers . 4
. “49*49
_
The 281 others (104 colored and 177 white) do not pay a penny of tax.
Taxes Have Decreased in Carbondale with Saloons Gone. <
The tax rate in Carbondale for: !
d
. , . All Purposes
1905 (ten saloons) .9 per cent
1907 (ten saloons) .9.8 per cent
T909 (one year after saloons were abolished).6.5 per cent
1910 (no saloons) .6 per cent
1911 (no saloons) .6 per cent
City *j
3 per cent \
3 per cent .
1.9 per cent
1.6 per cent ^
1.6 per cent 4
i
many saloons, but how few. We are in favor of a con
tinuance of the anti-license territory for Jacksonville.
HILLERBY’S DRYGOODS STORE.
SCARCELY A BUSINESS MAN WHO WANTS
THE SALOON.
Jacksonville, Illinois, March 7, 1912.
There is nothing at all to this “wet” and “dry” talk
■except from the standpoint of the “drys.” Just how any
business man can say that a saloon town is better for his
business than a non-saloon town is more than I can figure
•out.
In the case of our business we have always done both a
•cash and a ledger business and we can say that both show a
bigger balance than ever before. The man that invests his
money over the counter of a saloon is just the man that will
complain because he hasn’t the cash to pay for his harness
repairing or enough to buy the new saddle that he wants.
This puts the burden of the saloon on his horse, which may
not have the proper equipment to do his best work.
No, we have been here in business since 1838, and believe
that we ought to know something about business conditions
in our city. There is scarcely a merchant here that down in
his heart believes that the saloon is a good proposition, and
gradually those that were once “wet” are seeing that the
town has lost nothing, in fact gained, since the saloons were
voted out. And many of these men will vote “dry” the next
time the question comes up.
RAPPS’ HARNESS STORE,
Rapp Bros.
-o
ONE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR
FARMERS SAID KEEP THE SALOONS OUT.
Jacksonville, Illinois, March 7, 1912.
The loss of the saloons has not hurt us a bit. They
have been out for five years now, and if the loss of their
revenue, etc., was enough to bankrupt us all it is about time
that some of us were going under. Another thing that the
■“wets” predicted has not come true. They said that the
farmers would not drive into town if the town went “dry.”
Instead of this, 1,134 farmers and others, their wives, etc.,
signed a monster petition last fall asking the voters of this
city to keep the town free from saloons. And we did this
and we are going to do it again, and some day the liquor
bunch will realize that we mean to keep the saloons out for
all time.
SNERLY & TAYLOR, Groceries,
L. W. Snerly.
WE ENDORSE A “DRY” CITY.
Jacksonville, Illinois, March 7, 1912.
It is with pleasure that we endorse the business condi
tions as they exist in Jacksonville as boozeless in comparison
with being “wet.”
We find business conditions to be much better. Not only
are collections better, but customers buy a better class of
footwear and we have more customers.
We are thoroughly convinced that if the booze is taken
away it leaves more money to be spent on the family. This
means more business. So as a business proposition, we
endorse a “dry” city against a “wet” city.
HOPPER & SON, Footwear.
SATISFIED WITH THE NO-LICENSE REGIME.
Jacksonville, Illinois, March 7, 1912.
In answer to your inquiry will say that I have been in
business here while our city has been both “wet” and “dry,”
and find that my business is steadily improving and am well
satisfied with result of the “dry” regime so far as my busi
ness is concerned.
GEO. H. HARNEY,
Harness, Trunks and Hand Luggage.
-o
FOUR BANNER YEARS.
Jacksonville, Illinois, March 7, 1912.
As per your inquiry as regards our business in the past
four years, will say that we were favored with the biggest
business in that period, our collections, etc., being up to the

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