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The American issue. [volume] (Westerville, Ohio) 1912-19??, March 22, 1912, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2008060406/1912-03-22/ed-1/seq-6/

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io Galesburg were submitted to our student body and to their parents, t<>
*ay nothing of the faculty and the board of trustees, it would be voted
Inwn emphatically and with practical unanimity
TITOS. McClelland, President.
10 per cent, in 1910, 28 per cent and in 1911, 6 per cent over any preceed
ing year since the commencement of our business. We are well satisfied
with present conditions. WAGONER PRINTING COMPANY,
By S. A. Wagoner, President
LAST FOUR YEARS THE BEST YEARS.
TELEPHONE BUILDING
F. H. REARICK & SON,
Hardware.
Galesburg, 111.,
March 11. 1912.
The past four years, dur
ing which Galesburg has
been anti-saloon territory,
general business conditions
have, according to our ob
servation, been satisfactory.
Our firm has been in busi
ness in this city about thirty
eight years. The four y<
just past, taken together,
have been our best years.
We note especially an im
provement in collections and
a larger percentage of cash
business.
F. H. REARICK & SOX.
A SALOONLESS TOWN MEANS GOOD BUSINESS
FOR THE GROCER.
W. A. JORDAN COMPANY.
Wholesale Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables.
Galesburg, 111., March 11, 1912.
Will state that our business in the city of Galesburg under the local
•ption laws is far superior to any time previous. We have never had
better collections in the city than we have had for the past two years.
Our merchants are all ready to pay their bills, which demonstrate to us
that they get their money promptly from the consumer. When the
retailers get their money promptly, the wholesaler is sure to. I am glad
to say that we have not lost a dollar on a credit account during the last
two years in our city. I would regret exceedingly to see the town go
back “wet” like it was a few years ago. A local option town is the only
town for me to do business in, and all over our territory, when we
strike local option towns, we get good business and prompt pay.
W. A. JORDAN COMPANY,
By W. A. Jordan, President.
# * * *
BEST THAT THE CITY REMAIN “DRY.”
HINCHLIFF LUMBER COMPANY.
Lumber, Lime, Sand and Coal.
Galesburg, 111., March 7, 1912.
Since Galesburg went “dry” our business has been better each yeat
than any year preceeding that event. We feel that from a business stand
point, as well as a moral it is best for the welfare of Galesburg that the
city remain "dry.”
HINCHLIFF LUMBER COMPANY.
* * # *
WELL SATISFIED.
WAGONER PRINTING COMPANY.
Galesburg, 111., March 11, 1912.
I do not consider that the absence of saloons in Galesburg has been
r injury to our business: on the contrary, our increase in 1909 was
LAST TWO YEARS BEST.
DOYLE FURNITURE CO.
Home Outfitters.
Galesburg, III.,
March 11, 1912.
Business conditions under
local option have continued
very satisfactory. In fact the
past two years have far sur
passed anything in our past
experience, and we hope to
have Galesburg continue with
out saloons.
DOLYE FURNITURE CC
# * * *
THE GALESBURG
LABOR NEWS.
March 13, 1912.
DOYLE BUILDING
The business of the Labor ,
News Company has during the past year increased wonderfully. Our su'
scription list shows an increase of 150 per cent and our advertising
business has increased proportionately.
I believe the “dry” regime is largely responsible, because of the fac
that the spare time of the worker is now spent at home reading, while
his business is worth a great deal more to the merchant. Let’s not onH
keep what we have toward a "dry” city, but make it really "dry.”
GEO. PALMER Editor and Manager
* * * *
WANT EM BACK? NO!
Galesburg, 111., March.
In response to your inquiry, do I wish the saloon returned to Gaie
burg, I answer emphatically NO. Why should I? The four “dry”
years have been the best of the thirteen years of my residence here foi
business. I have a right to attribute the better business to the “dry'
regime. From what I can learn from Commercial Traveling Men, bus1
ness interests here and the city in general, is in better condition than towns
of similar size that are “wet.” I can think of no legitimate reason why, I oi
any other man should consent to the return of the saloon. The city is *
better and safer place to live because of its absence. We do not wa-u
the saloon. T. L. COAD.
* * * *
FOR BUSINESS REASONS KEEP IT "DRY.” ’
R. W. RANNEY & CO..
Boots and Shoes.
Galesburg, Ills.
We wish to state that after four years of no saloons in Galesbu -g
we are for business reasons, anxious that the town remain “dry.”
R. W. RANNEY & CO.
• * « *
BIGGEST BUSINESS IN FORTY-EIGHT YEARS.
Sincere appreciation is briefly expressed to our many friends whose
encouragement by spoken words and by continuous patronage have con
tributed to the upbuilding of this business, and made the past year the
greatest in our entire history of forty-eight years.—From New Yea’- ‘
Greetings of The O. T. Johnson Co.
How to Vote For Representatives
Although the minority representative system has
been in vogue in Illinois for more than forty years,
there is still a vast amount of misunderstanding with
respect to it. Under the general election law, and also
under the primary law, a voter in voting for members
of the house of representatives at Springfield has the
privilege of casting three votes for one candidate, or
a vote and a half for each of two candidates, or a vote
each for three candidates.
In this present legislative campaign, it is of very
vital importance that the voter bear in mind that on
the question of representatives in the general assembly
be has three votes to cast. In some of the districts
the party committee has decided to nominate but one
candidate, which means that but one name will go on
the ballot at the election in November. There may, of
course, be many candidates at the primary, but in that
case jnly one will be chosen. In other districts the
(tarty committee has decided that two shall be nom
inated, which means that no matter how many candi
dates there may be at the primary, only two of them
will have their names on the ballot in November. In
other districts the party committee has decided to
nominate three candidates, and in that case three
names, those receiving the highest number of vote>
at the primary, will go on the ballot in November.
Now it will be seen that if the voter “cumulates"
his vote, “plumps” it, in favor of any one candidate,
that candidate will stand a better chance of nomina
tion. If you are a local option voter, and only one
local option candidate is to be nominated at your party
primary in your district, you should cast all three votes
for him, which you may do by placing your cross in
the square in front of his name, and by not voting for
anybody else for that office. If. two local option can
didates are to be nominated at your party primary in
your district, you should vote a vote-and-one-half for
each, and you will do this by putting a cross mark in
front of the names of each one, and not otherwise
marking your ballot for that office.
The victory at the primary on April 9 will depend
very much upon the ability of the temperance people
to concentrate their vote upon the right candidates.
It will depend on whether the local option voters give
their votes to the candidates who are endorsed by the
Anti-Saloon League. Don’t waste your vote. Get to
gether. In division there is defeat—in united action
there is victory.

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