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The American issue. [volume] (Westerville, Ohio) 1912-19??, January 09, 1925, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn2008060406/1925-01-09/ed-1/seq-3/

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RATIFICATION OF ’ I8TH AMENDMENT
Vote of the States and the Order in Which They Approved the
Prohibition Amendment
1. Mississippi—Ratified by Senate, January 8, 1918, vote of 26 to 5
Ratified by House, January 8, 1918, vote of 93 to 3
2. Virginia—Ratified by Senate, January 10, 19’8, vote of 30 to 8
Ratified by House, January 11, 1918, vote of 84 to 13
3. Kentucky—Ratified by Senate, January 14, 1918, vote of 28 to- 6
Ratified by House, January 14, 1918, vote of 66 to 10
4. South Carolina—Ratified by Senate, January 18, 1918, vote of 28 to 6
Ratified by House, January 28, 1918, vote of 66 to 29
5. North Dakota—Ratified by Senate, January 25, 1918, vote of 43 to 2
Ratified by House, January 25, 1918, vote of 96 to 10
6. Maryland—Ratified by House, February 8, 1918, vote of 58 to 36
Ratified by Senate, February 13, 1918, vote of 18 to 7
7. Montana—Ratified by House, February 18, 1918, vote of 77 to 8
Ratified by Senate, February 19, 1918, vote of 35 to 2
8. Texas—Ratified by Senate, February 28, 1918, vote of 15 to 7
Ratified by House, March 4, 1918, vote of 72 to 30
9. Delaware—Ratified by House, March 14, 1918, vote of 27 to 6
Ratified by Senate, March 18, 1918, vote of 13 to 3
10. South Dakota—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, March 19, 1918, vote of 43 to 0
Ratified by House, March 20, 1918, vote of 86 to 0
11. Massachusetts—Ratified by House, March 26, 194.8, vote of 145 to 93
Ratified by Senate, April 2, 1918, vote of 27 to 12
12. Arizona—Ratified by Senate, May 23, 1918, vote of 17 to 0
Ratified by House, May 24, 1918, vote of 29 to 3
13. Georgia—Ratified by Senate, June 26, 1918, vote of 34 to 2
Ratified by House, June 26, 1918, vote of 129 to 24
14. Louisiana—Ratified by Senate, August 6, 1918, vote of 21 to 20
Ratified by House, August 8, 1918, vote of 69 to 41
15. Florida—Ratified by Senate, November 27, 1918, vote of 25 to 2
Ratified by House, November 27, 1918, vote of 61 to 3
16. Michigan—Ratified by Senate, January 2, 1919, vote of 30 to 0
Ratified by House, January 2, 1919, vote of 88 to 3
17. Ohio—Ratified by Senate, January 7, 1919, vote of 20 to 12
Ratified by House, January 7, 1919, vote of 85 to 30
18. Oklahoma—Ratified by Senate, January 7, 1919, vote of 43 to 0
Ratified by House, January 7, 1919, vote of 90 to 8
19. Maine—Ratified by Senate, January 8, 1919, vote of 30 to 0
Ratified by House, January 8, 1919, vote of 120 to 20
20. Idaho—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, January 7, 1919, vote of 38 to 0
Ratified by House, January 8, 1919, vote of 60 to 0
21. West Virginia—Ratified by Senate, January 9, 1919, vote of 26 to 0
Ratified by House, January 9, 1919, vote of 78 to 3
22. Washington—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, January 13, 1919, vote of 42 to 0
Ratified by House, January 13, 1919, vote of 90 to 0
23. Tennessee—Ratified by Senate, January 9, 1919, vote of 28 to 2
Ratified by House, January 13, 1919, vote of 81 to 2
24. California—Ratified by Senate, January 10, 1919, vot# of 24 to 15
Ratified by House, January 13, 1919, vote of 48 to 28
25. Illinois—Ratified by Senate, January 8, 1919, vote of 30 to 15
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 84 to 66
26. Indiana—Ratified by Senate, January 13, 1919, vote of 41 to 6
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 87 to 11
27. Arkansas—Ratified by Senate, January 14, 1919, vote of 34 to 0
Ratified by House, January 13, 1919, vote of 93 to 2
28. North Carolina—Ratified by Senate, January 10, 1919, unanimous without roll c
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote 93 to 10
29. Alabama—Ratified by Senate, January 14, 1919, vote of 23 to 11
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 64 to 34
30. Kansas—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, January 14, 1919, vote of 39 to 0
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 121 to 0
31. Oregon—Ratified by Senate, January 15, 1919, vote of 30 to 0
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 53 to 3
32. Iowa—Ratified by Senate, January 15, 1919, vote of 42 to 7
Ratified by House, January 15, 1919, vote of 86 to 13
33. Utah—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, Jcnuary 15, 1919, vote ot 16 to 0
Ratified by House, January 14, 1919, vote of 43 to 0
34. Colorado—Ratified by Senate, January 15, 1919, vote of 34 to 1
Ratified by House, January 15, 1919, vote of 63 to 2
35. New Hampshire—Ratified by Senate, January 15, 1919, vote of 19 to 4
Ratified by House, January 15, 1919, vote of 221 to 131
36. Nebraska—Ratified by Senate, January 13, 1919, vote of 31 to 7
Ratified by House, January 16, 1919, vote of 98 to 0
37. Missouri—Ratified by Senate, January 16, 1919, vole of 22 to 10
Ratified by House, January 16, 1919, vote of 104 to 36
38. Wyoming—Unanimous in both branches
Ratified by Senate, January 16, 1919, vote of 26 to 0
Ratified by House, January 16, 1919, vote of 52 to 0
39. Wisconsin—Ratified by Senate, January 16, 1919, vote of 19 to 11
Ratified by House, January 17, 1919, vote of 58 to 35
40. Minnesota—Ratified by Senate, January 16, 1919, vote of 48 to 13
Ratified by House, January 17, 1919, vote of 92 to 36
41. New Mexico—Ratified by Senate. January 20, 1919, vote of 12 to 4
Ratified by House, January 16, 1919, vote of 45 to 1
42. Nevada—Ratified by Senate, January 21, 1919, vote of 14 to 1
Ratified by House, January 20, 1919, vote of 33 to 3
43. Vermont—Ratified by Senate, January 16, 1919, vote of 26 to 3
Ratified by House, January 29, 1919, vote of 155 to 58
44. New York—Ratified by Senate, January 29, 1919, vote of 27 to 24
Ratified by House, January 23, 1919, vote of 81 to 66
45. Pennsylvania—Ratified by Senate, February 25, 1919, vote of 29 to 16
Ratified by House, February 4, 1919, vote of 110 to 93
46. New Jersey—Ratified by Senate, March 7, 1919, vote of 14 to 2
Ratified by House, March 9, 1919, vote of 33 to 24
SAM SMALL IN FLORIDA
Will Conduct Speaking Tour in Behai!
of Anti-Saloon League of Amer
ica and Florida League
Beginning at Jacksonville, January 11,
Dr. Sam W. Small will deliver a scries of
addresses in Florida cities, under direction
of the Anti-Saloon League of America,
with the co-operation of the Anti-Saloon
League of Florida.
In the schedule as now arranged, are
tlx: following cities:
Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Daytona
Beacli, Cocoa, West Palm Beach, Miami,
Ft. Lauderdale, Ft. Pierce, Melbourne,
Titusville, New Smyrna, Tampa, Lake
land, riant City, Tarpon Springs, Clear
water, Palmette, Manatee, Bradentovvn,
Sarasota, Arcadia, Ft. Myers, Wauchula,
Ft. Mead, Haines City, Winter Haven.
Lake Wales, Orlando, St. Cloud, Winter
Park, Winter Garden, Eustis, Lake Helen,
Daytona, Ormond, DeLand, Green Cove.
Other dates will be added to this list.
Though Sam Small is a bit older than
he was in the days when lie and Sam
Jones carried on evangelistic work all
over America and in other countries, his
eye is not dimmed nor his natural force
abated. He is the same eloquent fighter
of the liquor traffic he always was.
GOOD WORK IN NEVADA
Federal Officers Are Effective There as
Shown by Their Report of Activ
ities in October
Federal prohibition enforcement offi
cers arc doing effective work in Nevada
as revealed by their report for the month
of October which is typical of work done
by the officers every month of the year.
Nevada is one of the few states of the
Union without a state enforcement code
and of course for that reason all the work
of hunting down and prosecuting the
all booze criminals falls upon federal offi
cers.
The report for October which covers
the activities of the district, including not
only the state of Nevada but five counties
of California, comprising a total area of
125,000 square miles, shows that there
were 32 arrests made and 47 convictions.
The jail sentences averages 95 days and
fines levied totaled $11,730.
There were 32 temporary injunction
cases; six places were closed for one year
and one. for less, than one year. The offi
cers destroyed seven stills, seized 67 gal
lons of whisky, 80 gallons of beer and
102 gallons of wine. They destroyed in
addition 1,770 gallons of mash. All this
work is done with an average of five men.
During the month these men traveled in
autos a distance of 4,231 miles and by
raii 807 miles.
BUSY YEAR FOR SEIZURES
More Than $10,000,000 Worth of
Property Used for Violation
Taken by Government
Automobiles to flic number of 5,214 and
valued at $3,226,339 were seized by prohi
bition authorities in the last fiscal year,
according to information furnished the
House in a tabic inserted in the report of
the Treasury-FostofTice appropriation bill
by Assistant Prohibition Commissioner
Jones, says a Washington dispatch of
December 20. Boats and launches seized
during the year numbered 236, valued at
$279,198.
The total appraised value of properjy
seized and destroyed under the prohibi
tion laws was $3,097,929 and that seized
but not destroyed was $7,745,952. Pro
ceeds of sale of seized property amounted
to $57,071, and expenses incurred incident
to seizure and sale totaled $12,323.
Two agents were killed in the perform
ance of duty and 28 were injured. Per
sons arrested numbered 68,161.
The table showed that the south led all
sections in seizures. In Tennessee 1,141
distilleries were seized with 819,590 wine
gallons of mash; in Georgia 1,472 stills,
16,389 fermenters ,and 1,798,136 wine gal
lons of malt liquor; in Virginia 630 still
worms; and in Louisiana 29,089 wine gal
lons of pomace.
Missouri led all states in spirits seized,
amounting to 939,582.39 wine gallons.
New Jersey was first in cider seizures,
with 15,311 wine gallons, and California
first in the amount of wine confiscated
with 61,084 gallons.
GETS THE LIMIT
James Emmett, aged 54, of Columbus,
Ohio, was fined the limit, $100, for intox
ication after he had struck his 81-ycar-old
mother, Mrs. Cornelia Emmett, during
the progress of a drinking bout at their
home, in which Mrs. Emmett also was
intoxicated, according to charges of the
court. Judge Berry said lie regretted
that the law did not permit him to impose
a more severe sentence.
POLICEMEN ARE CONVICTED
Five persons, including three police
men, one a sergeant, were convicted by a
federal jury in Cleveland, Ohio, on De
cember 15 on charges of violating the pro
hibition laws. This is the first case in
Cleveland in which policemen have been
convicted, according to a statement by
United States Attorney A. E. Bcrnsteen.
All except one of the defendants were
convicted on a charge of conspiracy.
The man who throws bricks at the
prohibition law is aiming at the govern
ment itself.
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG OF THE UNITED
STATES AND THE REPUBLIC FOR WHICH IT STANDS, ONE NA
TION, INDIVISIBLE, AND WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.

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