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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, September 06, 1940, Image 7

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■priday, September 6, 1940
I
By FRANK GRAHAM
fcst-starring for Morris Weiner
Editor's Note: Frank Gra
|ham, veteran sports scribe
|of the New York Sun, is
■considered one of the fore
most sports writers in the
■country. His daily column in
[the Sun, “Setting the Pace,”
[is a literary gem in the
[world of sports. Readers of
[this column will remember
[jtr. Graham’s splendid arti
cle on “The Hebrew and the
[irishman Joe Gould and
[jimmy Braddock.” Today’s
[release on Hank Greenberg,
[jewish slugger of the De
troit Tigers, is written with
[the typical Grahamesque
[flourish.
I TIGER IN THE YANKEES’
DUGOUT”
Hank Greenberg was on his way
f the clubhouse to change his
Urt after the Tigers’ batting
tectice before a recent game in
few York. The entrance to both
Lbhouses lies through one end
; the Yankees’ dugout and he
topped at the dugout and sat
tovn on the steps.
“Do you think it will be all
feht if I sit here for a few min
tes?” he asked.
“S u r e,” a reporter said. “I
low McCarthy personally and it
ill be all right.”
|joe McCarthy was sitting down
t the other end of the dugout. He
finned at Greenberg.
"How are you, Joe?” Greenberg
lid.
He sat there mopping the sweat
■om his brow.
“When are you guys going to
nne to life and knock those
leveland bums out of first
lace?” a reporter asked.
“Don’t ask me,” Greenberg said.
Im not a member of the board
MYRTLE AVENUE
LUMBER CO.
Lumber and Building
Supplies
Myrtle Ave. at Elm St.
Phone 5-4260
. . . checks
t A A MALARIA
J II in 7 days and
relieves
iquid - Tablets COLDS
ilve-Nose Drops s y m Pt° ms first
day
ry “Rub-My-Tism”-a Wonderful
Liniment
SANDWICH INN
MAIN AT 27TH
PARK AT GILMORE
MIAMI ROAD IN
SO. JACKSONVILLE
Ride Safely With Safety
Satet? (tabs, Inc.
"none ■■ /v
5-7800 w luc
Authorized and Bonded
_ BAGGAGE TRANSFER
= "” r |
Crippled Cripple
ShoesJf^pvFeet
I* pays to keep the Families'
shoes in 300 c! condition.
L«t us take care of them for
V°d» They won’t look repairedl
LOUIS SHOE SHOP
2028 Pearl St. Phone 5-2986
JEWS IN
SPORTS
ty Morris Weiner
of strategy any more. I used to be
in on all the conferences in the
infield when somebody on the oth
er club hit one but now I am just
the left fielder.”
“You’re more than just the left
fielder to me,” Jim Kahn said. “I
always say: ‘He’s more than the
Detroit left fielder. He is the best
left fielder Detroit has had since
Rudy York.’ ”
“HOW HANK BECAME AN
OUTFIELDER”
A reporter asked him how it
happened that he was switched to
the outfield in the first place.
“I’ll tell you,” Greenbferg said.
“Rudy York was playing out
there and a ball was hit to him
in a pinch one day. It was a well
hit ball but he charged for it.
And it went over his head and
hit the wall for two bases.”
“Well,” the reporter asked,
“what did that have to do with
you?”
“Why,” Hank said, “that’s how ,
I became an outfielder. I also
suspect some of my enemies had
a hand in it. They figured that if
I stood around in the outfield long
enough 1 would get hit on the
head. So far, however, I have been
lucky, although I have had a few
narrow escapes.” i
“You know the story about
Babe Herman when he was with
the Dodgers, don’t you?” a re
porter asked. “He said to some of
us one day: ‘You fellows have a
lot of fun writing about me being
in danger of being hit on the head
with a fly ball but I promise you
this: If I ever get hit on the head
with a fly ball I will walk off the
field and out of the park and I
will never come back.’ So one of
us said: ‘How about getting hit on
the shoulder?’ And the Babe said:
‘Oh no! On the shoulder don’t
count.’ ”
‘Well,” Hank said, “I will not
be as rash as Herman. I will not
make any promises.”
“WHEN HE GOT THERE HE
WAS WINDED”
“How do you like playing the
outfield —on the level, now?” a
reporter asked.
“I like it very much,” Hank
said. “Really it’s a great life. I do
miss being in the infield once in a
while, though. It gets a little
lonesome out there and you miss
all the rows. It’s too far to run
in just to have something to say
to an umpire.
RESILIENT
FLOORS CO.
Asphalt Tile Tile-Tex
Floor Coverings
148 Riverside Ave. 6-4995
Hedrick & Whitney Co.
Driveways
General Concrete Work
“Jax’s Oldest Concrete
Contractors”
564 Stockton Phone 7-2159
Rent a Car From
Royal Auto
Rentals, Inc.
430 W. Adams 5-0181
GARDNER’S
SERVICE STATION
BLUE SUNOCO GAS
& OILS
Washing - Polishing
- Accessories -
Main Street at Eleventh St.
Phone 5-9121
BONO
CLEANERS and DYERS
WE CALL AND DELIVER
hll Garments Fully Protected
By Insurance
Phone 3-9254 1005 Forest St.
THE SOUTHERN JEWISH WEEKLY
“I did it once. We were playing
Washington and Walker was on
first base and a line drive was
hit to me. He was running when
the ball was hit and he was about
twenty feet up the line toward
second base when I made the
throw. He saw he was trapped
and he put his hands up like this
—he was going to catch the ball,
first, and then changed his mind
and twisted around like this—and
the ball hit him here on the shoul
der and bounced away and he ran
to second. Giesel was the umpire
and he didn’t say anything or
make any move to send Walker
back and Tebbetts and all the in
fielders were squawking. I ran in
and as I pulled up, Giesel turned
around and saw me and he says:
“ ’What are you doing in here ?’
“I am out of breath and can’t
answer him and just stand there
panting at him and Tebbets says:
“ ’He ain’t out for interference ?’
“Giesel says, ‘No.’
“And Tebbets says: ‘ls that your
final decision?*
“Giesel says, ‘Yes.’
“And Tebbets says: ‘Well I say
it stinks.’
“By this time I have got my
wind back and I say: ‘That’s what
I say, too!’
“Giesel whirls on me and says:
“ ‘Another word out of you and
you’re going out of the ball game.
Get back in the outfield where you
belong.’
“So I haven’t run in since.”
THE BLEACHER INTELLECT
UALS—
“That’s right,” John Schulte
said. "Never charge an umpire,
ne’s liable to turn on you, no
matter how well he knows you. I
was with the Cubs when Doily
Stark broke in and he’s a good
friend of mine and I helped him
all I could. One day he made a de
cision against us, and I wasn’t
in the ball game but was sitting
on the bench and I got up and
walked out there. There were a
lot of our fellows standing around
Dolly arguing with him, and as I
walked up he said to me:
“ ‘What are you doing out
here?’
“I said: ‘I just came out to tell
you I thought that was a lousy
decision.’
“And he said: ‘ls that so? Well,
when you go back, keep right on
going to the clubhouse because
you are out of the ball game.’ ”
“There is one thing I like par
ticularly about playing the out
field,” Greenberg said. “It keeps
you in close touch* with the intel-
I lectuals in the belachers.”
“Do you hear from them much?”
“I hear from them all the
time,” he said. “You would be
surprised at some of the things
1 hear, too. They would make very
good reading—if you could print
them?”
“Hdw about some of the milder
things they say?”
“Well,” he said, “in the ninth
inning yesterday the Sox are ral
lying against us. I have just
thrown a man out at the plate
but the next hitter doubles, driv
ing in a couple of runs, and I am
chasing the ball into the left field
corner, and a fellow in the bleach
ers yells at me:
“ ‘lt serves you right, you big
bum! You lost the game in the
third inning!’
“Can you imagine that? I
didn’t get a hit with two men on
in the third inning and now it is
the ninth inning and they are
coming from behind to beat us
and I have just cut a run off at
the plate, but the way this fellow
has it figured, I lost the game in
the third inning and I am a big
bum.”
Lucielle Shop
Millinery Hosiery
ROSE JOEL
257 Laura St. Phone 5-6552
Hal Bodden’s
UNIQUE DRIVE-IN
Atlantic Boulevard
Specializing in
Poor Boy Sandwiches
New Orleans Style
Complete Fountain Service
Music To My Ears
By DANIEL SCHORR 1
I LOVE MOUNTAIN MUSIC |
Haines Falls, N. Y. i
We are vacationing at Andron’s <
Mountain House, with the world- <
famed view, among numerous oth- <
er attractions. Let’s get the “plug”
over with at the outset so we can :
get on to matters more musical. :
Our vacations led us to an in- i
vestigation of the general state of
music at Summer resorts, and we
were interested to find that (1)
many hotels boast first-rate musi
cians who play in symphony or
chestras during the Winter, (2)
interest in serious music has been
increasing rapidly at resorts, (3)
many of the musicians are persons
of amazing versatility.
To begin with the last point (on
vacation we can indulge in this
lapse of orderliness): the other
night, as we were repairing to
our room after a long and late ses
sion of hot dance music, we heard
strains of Bach issuing from a
closed door. Curious, we knocked
to inquire. It was the room of the
bass-fiddler player of the house
band; he was practicing for an ex
amination in the Fall for a posi
tion in a major symphony orches
tra.
He showed us his music and dis
cussed, with enthusiasm amount
ing to fervor, his love of Bach.
Fifteen minutes before he had been
slapping away at his bass-viol to
the rhythm of the Conga, and now
he was engrossed in the stately
rhythms of Bach.
“You’ll find many Jekyli-Hyde
musicians these days,” said the
musician whose name, by the
way, is Philip Epstein—“ You see,
there aren’t enough positions in
symphony orchestras to go ’round.
And musicians have to make a liv
ing. Also, the Summer is a dull
season for serious music, except
for the music festivals and the
Summer concerts, so many sym
phony orchestra men choose this
way to combine a vacation with
some extra earning. You’ll find,
surprisingly, that many fine musi
cians enjoy playing swing; it’s a
form of relaxation for them.”
The next afternoon we dropped
into the ballroom and found three
of the staff musicians, alone, play
ing little-known trios. It seems
that their nights of jazz don’t
spoil them for serious music. And
some are so versatile that they
excel in both fields.
Not only are there many seri
ous musicians to be found in the
hotel bands, but the guests seem
to be becoming more music-mind
| ed. This hotel includes a concert
every week as part of its regular
For Sales and Service
G. M. C. Trucks
Phone or Visit
GENERAL
TRUCK CO.
820 Forest St. Phone 5-3908
For Speed, Dependability and
Economy
use
GAS
The Perfect Fuel
for
Cooking Refrigeration
Water Heating House Heating
program—with great success. An
other hotel boasts a complete sym
phony orchestra, and one has a
string trio. Time was when a va
cation implied abandonment of ev
erything serious, including “seri
ous” music. But the awe in
which “serious” music was held
for generations is being dispelled,
and summer hotel guests are find
ing that good music can be a re
laxation as well as a duty.
Hotel operators say that sym
phonic music (usually the more
familiar classics) is receiving con
stantly greater attention, because
of popular demand.
And so, with music invading the
mountain resorts, we say, with the
hilbillies: “I love mountain music.”
For Grade A Raw or
Pasteurized MILK
Call County 0432
PERRET’S DAIRY
“Home of Better Milk”
DEVSMORE, FLA.
. Get This Bargain
| r«u< hm> ECSSB
fcmamm llesi
For a short time only, we include with each
purchase of o quart of Fuliustre o Fuller
opplicator both for only 99c.
Fuliustre, the famous quick drying floor
polish, is the easy way to bright shining
floors- no rubbing or polishing required
FULLER BRUSH CO.
W. H. LAV AN, Manager
SPIRELLA
FOUNDATION
GARMENTS
• Corsets, girdles, brassieres
or one-piece garments. . .
designed exclusively for your
figure at its best.
Miss C. M. Borcherding R.N.
556 OAK ST.
PHONE 7-6555
Order Your Fuel Oil
From
Simmons Ice Co.
412 Margauet St. Ph. 5-3776
Cold Alone Is Not Enough
See our new AIR CONDI
TIONED Ice Refrigeration.
This modern refrigeration
keeps your food fresher
longer—keeps their tender
flavor juicy.
Atlantic Ice & Coal Co.
Myrtle Avenue Phone 5-2500
Page Seven

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