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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, January 03, 1941, Image 7

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3, 1941
I JSsHCHAMPS OF THE
I ,E LAST DECADE
I Although the 1940 sports jam-
Mnree did not wind up with as ma
m! Jewish champions on top of the
Ee as we would have liked to see,
m retrospective glance over the
Kies for the last ten years reveals
Kat the 1931-1940 sports carnival
■L the greatest period of pros-
Eritv for Jewish athletes in or-
Kuuzed athletics since the first
Eat carrying a Hebrew immigrant
Knched these shores some three
Endred years ago. The last dec-
Ee provided thrills in sports ga-
Ee and set a mark for the num-
E r of Jewish boys and girls who
Erticipated in sports that will be
K* long time being equaled. Per
■ r the brilliant achievements
Etched on the sporting record
Eay be duplicated in the next ten
Ears—but what a fight it will be
Ed what a sight for the specta
tors.
I perhaps the celebration for the
Ew decade has dimmed your
■nemory? In that case we’ll men-
Kon but a few of the top-notch
Ejebrew Heroes who have graced
Ke headlines in the sport pages
Eince the day when A1 Singer won
Ee lightweight championship back
A 1930 to become the second
Eewish lad to hold the world’s ti-
Ee in the 135 pound class. The cal
endar is so crowded, we really
Eon’t know where to begin. Foot-
Egii provided such headliners as
Ered Sington, Marchmont
Schwartz of Notre Dame, Harry
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JEWS IN
SPORTS
by Morris Weiner
Newman of Michigan, Aaron Ro
senberg of Southern California,
“King Kong” Klein of N.Y.U,. A1
Hessburg of Yale, Barney Mintz
of Tulane, Dave Smukler of Tem
ple, Marshall Goldberg of Pitt and
last but not least, the kid who pro
vided the greatest thrill in foot
ball for us—Sid Luckman. Maxie
Rosenbloom and Maxie Baer set
the boxing stage with laughs while
Barney Ross, also a champion,
lent a lustre to the lightweight ti
tle that may never be dimmed.
Hank Greenberg and Hank Dan
ning broke into big league baseball
this past decade and the 1930-
1940 period also introduced such
new faces as Morrie Arnovich, Phil
Weintraub, Buddy Myer, Jonah
Goldman, Milt Galatzer, Willard
Hershberger and Jack Grossman.
Os the names mentioned only
Greenberg and Danning and Ar
novich are still connected with the
majors—but what an enviable rec
ord this trio has compiled.
A survey column such as this
could go and on for columns
and columns to tell you of the
thrills and spills, fights and flops
we’ve seen during the last decade
but we haven’t the space nor the
time to do so. Suffice it that we
give you some of the greatest
thrills in sports that we’ve seen
during the 1930-1940 period.
FOOTBALL:
A packed Yankee Stadium is
watching a highly touted Army
team twist the tail of the Colum
bia Lion. The score is 13-6 in fa
vor of the Cadets from West
Point. The Mule has just scored
and the Blues have elected to re
ceive the kickoff. A slender dark
haired kid is way back on his own
goal line waiting for the pigskin.
He grabs the ball and shoots
straight down the middle. He stiff
arms an Army player and squirms
and spins up the field. Interfer
ence is forming for him. He’s past
the mid-field stripe . . . down past
the forty—the thirty—-he’s over.
One of the more dramatic touch
downs scored by Sid Luckman in
his brilliant career at Columbia
and surely one of our greatest
thrills in sports . . .
BOXING:
The scene is the Polo Grounds.
Poison Jimmy McLarnin, the Irish
kid from the Pacific Coast whose
terrific lefts have ended the pugi
listic aspirations of a score of Jew
ish fighters, is battling against
another Jewish kid and has him
on the ropes. The bell clangs to end
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THE SOUTHERN JEWISH WEEKLY
Dan Frohman
Bows Out
(Continued from Page Two)
That is what we find in Shake
speare. Every young man and wo
man places himself in the posi
tion of Romeo and Juliet. In Mac
beth there is the element of am
bition forced forward wrongfully.
“In the drama we must always
find vice overcome by virtue. This
is a first essential. It is the same
in life.”
Uncle Dan deplored rising reli
gious prejudice—in fact, any divi
sion between man and man. “There
were no signs of religion in the
Bible,” he said. “The only religion
mentioned was humanity.”
He himself had been a victim of
religious prejudice the year be
fore. He laughed as he recalled the
incident when he was barred from
the swanky Lido Club because he
was a Jew.
He recalled that once before he
had been excluded from a leading
hotel at Lake Saranac. “I was al
lowed to rehearse, but not to sleep
at the hotel. Lately I entertained
those who had barred me. I told
them they could dine here in my
studio, but they could not sleep
under my roof.”
To the end Uncle Dan main
tained his interest in the Actors’
Fund of America, which he found
ed. The Actors’ Home in Engle
wood, N. J., is a monument to his
love of the theater and every per
son connected with it. In past
the seventh round and some thir
ty-five thousand Jewish fans ot
the sixty-odd thousand spectators
raise a mighty plea to young Bar
ney Ross to come through .•. .
And the fight—for the next eight
rounds was the most exciting ring
battle this corner has ever seen.
The two gallant scrappers—Bar
ney Ross, the dapper scrapper
from Chicago and Jimmy McLar
nin, gentleman gamecock, stood
toe to toe in the middle of the ring
and actually lambasted each other
beyond recognition . . . The nod
went to Barney Ross who thus
earned the lightweight champion
ship of the world. What a fight!
BASKETBALL:
There were some mighty thrill
ing games we’ve seen on the bas
ketball court whether at the Penn
Palestra or the Garden in New
York—but none has ever matched
the intensity and the sheer inspi
ration that dogged a game between
the University of Pittsburgh and
C.C.N.Y. almost at the beginning
of the sports cycle we’ve been talk
ing about. The City team was
playing without the services of its
great coach—Nat Holman. It was
playing listlessly, missing shots,
and committing* blunders that a
school kid would have been
ashamed of. Pitt was leading by
some fifteen points. The game was
in its final ten minutes. Some of
the crowd were already filing out
when someone spied Nat Holman
coming on the floor. He was re
turning from the sick-bed of his
brother who was critically ill. He
walked to the players’ bench, sat
down and watched the game in
tently without saying a word of
greeting to the fans or players.
But somehow the lads on the court
sensed the presence of the Master.
City came to life. In the final ten
minutes C.C.N.Y. —a really in
spired team if ever there was one
—scored twenty-two points—Pitt
scoring nothing. Said Pat Mur
ray, the referee of the game, “I’d
never have believed such a thing
possible. In all my thirty years of
officiating I’ve never seen such an
electrical inspiration provided a
team by a coach as we’ve just seen
done by Holman.” . . . From a
spectator’s point of view—it was
simply terrific simply thrilling.
We’ve only scratched the sur
face . . . We’ll go on in the next
ten years and remind you of some
of the high spots of the years just
gone by. We only hope for the
sake of the younger generation —
that such feats can be duplicated.
As a matter of fact, we know they
will be sports have away to
make the past seem old fashioned
and the gigantic records of today
will fall by the wayside as mere
child’s play for the athletes of the
next ten years.
LOOK AT THE OTHER END! ***
years hundreds of actors had come
to him for aid and advice. It is not
for nothing he was called “the ac
tor’s friend.”
Uncle Dan, from his retirement,
saw tastes in the theater chang
ing. The florid drama of his age
was giving way to stark realism.
The theater was speaking a dif
ferent and more earthly language.
But one basic element remained.
Human plays were always the best
ones, he said.
Last month Uncle Dan fell and
broke his hip in his hotel apart
ment. Shortly afterward he con
tracted pneumonia. He felt it was
his last illness and had been tell
ing callers for several days before
his death that “the final curtain
is about to fall.”
....Like the systematic producer he
was, he had arranged all his af
fairs. Two years ago he had even
sent his own obituary to newspa
per editors with a note saying
that “as I may soon pass away,
you may want these facts.” Re
porters rushed to Frohman’s of
fice to find out if he was ailing
and he said that he never felt bet
ter in his life, “but you can’t live
forever and I thought you mfght
want to have the facts.”
Uncle Dan didn’t die right. His
mind worked in a theatrical way,
and it must have been a disap
pointment to him that he met a
commonplace and undramatic end
in a sanitarium. But perhaps it
was better that Dan Frohman
bowed out quietly; his life in the
American stage was so rich and
full that any theatrical last scene
might have been an anti-climax.
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There's Always e Good Show et e
Sparks Theatre
Florida—Arcade—Empress—
Palace Capitol
San Marco Roxy —-
Imperial
Page Seven

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