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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, November 07, 1941, Image 7

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Friday, November 7, 1941
%
EjdJ JEWS IN I
S\ SPORTS
" by Morris Weiner
meet lou oshins . . .
Benny Friedman isn’t the only
Jewish head coach of a football
team in this country. We know
of one other. He’s.. Lou.. Oshins,
head coach and athletic director
of Brooklyn College and strangely
enough., traditionally bitter rival
of the gridiron eleven coached by
his confere Maestro Benny Fried
man. But all this is a story in
itself.
But let’s meet Lou Oshins. Lou
is a dapper chap, dark, handsome,
though not very tall. He still
gives the appearance of a young
ish 35 despite the fact that some
of his problems at Brooklyn Col
lege would be enough to make any
other man prematurely gray and
senile. But not Lou. He can take
a beating more ways than one and
he possesses that resilient quality
to come back for more.
Oshins is a graduate of C. C.
N. Y., and an old Varsity man.
After his graduation he entered
the health education department
of Brooklyn College, then an an
nex of City, and summarily pro
ceeded to become head coach of
the Brooklyn teams. Os course,
he was handicapped from the
start. Most of his athletes would
transfer to the uptown division af
ter two years of schooling at
Oshins’ institution and Lou would
have to begin all over again.
What is more, Lou would have to
hold his practices on a catch-as
catch can basis since he would
never lure really good athletes to
the buildings amid the hub-bub of
the roaring Brooklyn traffic, his
teams were really patch-quilt af
fairs and never outstanding. How
ever, the important thing is that
Lou was never discouraged and
kept on plugging.
If virtue is its own reward along
with perserverance and wishful
thinking, then Oehina’ dream came
true. We should say—part of his
dream. Brooklyn College became
an independent unit. Moreover,
ground was broken for regular
academic buildings and Lou was
appointed athletic director of the
new school. Nonetheless, he still
held on to the coaching reins of
many of the college’s teams.
Brooklyn College is part of the
collegiate division of the Board of
Higher Education financed by the
money of the world’s richest city.
It spared nothing in building the
new collegiate center and its gym
nasium and playing field and prac
tice grounds were really the last
words. Many a privately owned
and wealthier institution would
turn green with envy at the equip-
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ment of this ten year old learning
center. However, the one thing
necessary was omitted. The col
lege provided everything for the
athletes except the athletes them
selves. And Oshins still insisted
on making the most out of nothing
and keeping the old college spirit
going in a school where spirit and
sports were secondary to studies
and textbooks.
Brooklyn College draws from
some thirty high schools and its
registration is numbered high in
the thousands but high pressure
prosylitization and lucrative offers
from the big name football schools
draws the top-notch athletes away
from the home grounds, provided
that the boys had the terrifically
high average to get into Brooklyn
College in the first place. And,
scholarship standards are never \
relaxed. Another headache for a
valiant coach.
When one reads of a squad of
75 or a hundred training for
football at Notre Dame or Minne
sota or Pennsylvania or Southern
California, he is not at all sur
prised. But if you had the job of
creating a football team out of a
handful of some nineteen or
twenty youngsters—some of whom
never held a pigskin in their
hands —and attempting to mould |
a workable machine out of this
nebulous mass—you would be able j
to gather some of the formidable
tasks confronting a coach. And,
suppose that a boy comes out for
football and then learns that it is
impossible for him to play any
more because of financial reasons, i
A coach would easily be forgiven
if he threw up his hands and said
“To hell with it.” But not Lou
Oshins. He goes out and finds
jobs for the boys.
What is more, as athletic direc
tor, Lou is the man who books fu
ture teams on the schedule. This
too he does very shrewdly. He
books clubs in the same football
division as Brooklyn but he does
so with an eye to the guarantees
offered. He accepts the most lu- j
crative and so a sport that is sup- :
ported but slightly on its home
grounds, pays for itself year after
year. As a matter of fact, there
is but one game that is a sell-out.
That is the annual classic between
Brooklyn College coached by Lou
Oshins and City College, coached
by Maestro Benny Friedman. The
rivalry is bitter. And not even
the highly touted opposition be
tween Notre Dame and Army,
Pennsylvania and Cornell and
Michigan and Minnesota nor the
colorful tradition of a Yale-Har- ■
vard or a Princeton-Columbia tilt
can match the bitterness and the
keenness es play between these
two small time football institu
tinons. And more times than not,
Lou’s teams have taken their old
er brethren into camp.
The chances are that until this
minute, you sport fans in the
Southlands, in the Northwest and
on the Pacific coast—no matter
where you are—you never have
heard of this gallant, perservenng,
hard-working coach. Chances are
you never will despite his coach
ing acumen and his astute ways
of handling a difficult athletic di
rectorship, Lou is content to re
main at his own Brooklyn College.
The spirit of the school itself is
the only small time affair Lou
works with. His athletes who
perform under the most adverse
conditions and under the very
jeers of their own students are a
tallant lot. The very fact that
these boys even play is d "f 5?
Oshins* indefatigable BP irit
So it’s hats off to a gallant band
of athletes and to an untm g
coach.
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THE SOUTHERN JEWISH WEEKLY
Sholem Alechem
As I Knew Him
(Copyrighted)
Especially written for the Southern Jewish Weekly
BY JENNY ROBERTS
Part VIII
Conclusion
Shclem Alechem wrote many
stories in which he pictures the
poor people of his native land.
These poor people Sholem referred
to as the little people. In his
short stories he attempts to show
that no matter how poor and
downtrodden. these little people
are they maintain above all a
sense of humor, a sense of humor
which serves as a bulwark against
adverse conditions and thus makes
life a little bit easier—when they
have nothing with which to sus
tain themselves it is their wit
which nourishes them. From their
starved and embittered hearts
Sholem was always able to draw
a laugh. Often Sholem’s little
| people have been forced to
believe that they are the forsaken,
I but if they do question their God
it is only to themselves.
Sholem died in New York City
on May 13, 1916. He was laid to
rest in Mount Nebo Cemetery,
in Brooklyn. This was only a tem
porary resting place for him. Be
tween 1916 and 1921 many discus
sions were held among his admir
ers as to where Sholem’s final
place of burial should be. To re
turn his remains to Russia was out
of the question because, at the
time, the world war was raging.
It was finally decided that his
remains should be placed with
those of the working people, the
little people of whom he wrote and
loved.
In 1921 Sholem Alechem was in
terred in Mount Carmel Cemetery,
Cypress Hills, Brooklyn, N. Y., a
land indeed strange to him, but
to a Jew who is accustomed to
strange lands and strange circum
stances, what does it matter, so
long as he is with his own people ?
, Sholem Alechem’s will was a
very short one. Besides mention
ing the few bequests to his imme
diate family, his one outstanding
| wish was that on every May 13 —
'many of his friends and his little
people should gather in an audi
torium and read of his stories and
they should laugh and forget their
worries.
On May 13, 1917, the first an
niversary of Sholem’s death, a
tremendous memorial was held in
the Manhattan Opera House in
New York City. On that occasion
many of the outstanding artists
from the Yiddish speaking stage
and several from the Metropolitan
Opera House took part in an ef
fort to make this a memorable
! affair. Several tremendously large
gatherings have been held since.
Every year on May 13, many
homes as well as literary circles
and organizations gather in the
atres and in community centers to
honor Sholem Alechem’s memory.
Again they read his word aloud
and laugh just as he had wished
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they would.
When discussing the Jewish
problem with Sholem Alechem, he
once said, “Jennie, unfortunately
the Jewish people have only too
frequently received sudden jolts,
or awakenings from a period of
peace which are intermittent and
of short duration. But we must
laugh at those fools who make
trouble for us—we will not be ex
terminated.”
Answers To The j
Quizmaster
(Questions on Page Five)
1— The Mufti has finally been |
located in Italy where he arrived ,
after an airplane trip from Teher- j
an. His escape from the British
has aroused much criticism in the
British press and apprehension in
Zionist circles.
2 Berthold Jacobs is the Ger
man-Jewish journalist who was
kidnapped from Switzerland by
Gestapo agents and taken to a
Nazi prison. He was detained for
several months until world-wide
protests and Switzerland’s threat
to take his case to the World
Court at The Hague forced the
Nazis to release him. His kid
napping was fictionalized in a
novel “Paris Gazette” by Lion
Feuchtwanger.
3On Oct. 28, 1941 the Czecho
slovakian Government celebrated
the 23rd anniversary of its coun
try’s independence. On Oct. 28,
1 1918, Thomas Masaryk
the independent Czechoslovakian
i state.
4 Hillel, president of the San
hedrin from 30 b. c. e. to 9 c. e.,
, was the greatest of Jewish teach
. ers. He was the advocate of the
• famous Golden Rule: "What is
. hateful unto thee, do not do unto
, thy fellowman.”
& —Rabbi Meir Berlin is honor
[ ary president of the World Miz
■ rachi. Berl Katznelson is the
editor of the Labor Daily Davar,
. the largest newspaper in Pales
tine. Dr. Gravanovsky is the
L present managing director of the
i JNF.
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VICHY, (JTA)—The trial by
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Page Seven

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