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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, September 19, 1947, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000090/1947-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. 23 NO. 34
18 Refugee Teachers
’repared for Posts
Throughout Country
A group of 18 refugee religious
teachers have just completed a
course in "American Teaching
Methods and Philosophy" at Yesh-
Iva University in New York City
which was especially arranged by
United Service for New Americans
to prepare them for teaching posts
at American Jewish religious
schools.
Most of the teachers formerly
attended renowned Yeshivas in
Poland and other European coun
tries. They are among the hund
reds of religious leaders and rab
binical students who have arrived
In this country since the end of
the war from European countries
and the Far East with the aid of
United Service, whose work is
supported by the $170,000,000 cam
paign of the United Jewish Appeal
for 1947.
Completion of the course, which
was conducted at the University
by Dr. Pincus Churgin, will enable
the teachers to adopt their Euro
pean Jewish training and experi
ence to the needs of religious in
stitutions in American Jewish
communities.
Three of the teachers have al
ready obtained positions in the
states of New York, New Jersey
and Connecticut with the aid of
United Service. The rest are ex
pected to find positions in the near
future in communities throughout
the country.
UPA Meets on Oct. 11th
The United Palestine Appeal
will meet on Saturday evening,
October 11 and Sunday, October
12, 1947, at the Shorejiam Hotel,
In Washington, D. C.
The first such assembly con
vened by the United Palestine
Appeal since 1944, the National
Conference for Palestine will be
a momentous occasion to deter
mine the further progress of the
fund-raising instrument of Ameri
can Jewry for the rebuilding of
the Jewish National Home in Pal
estine. The outstanding figures in
world and American Jewry will
®hare in the program.' Among
e many distinguished personal
ties who will participate will be:
Hon. Henry Morgenthau, Jr.—
Chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal.
Dr - Abba Hillel Silver—Chair
man, American Section, Jewish
Agency f or Palestine.
Hr. Chaim Weizmann—Former
resident, Jewish Agency for Pal
estine.
C ep Heh S. Wise—National
0 airman, United Palestine
Appeal.
The United Palestine Appeal is
this conference for a two-
UK f Ur P°se: to evaluate the vast
esti . ilTg effort of modern' Pal
" 6 fought into being with the
at fi, aid 0f Ameri can Jewry, and
e same time, to chart the
th P t course of our labors for
2 f Wish National Home, the
, vin ;r ier of ho P e for the sur
je g , eWs of Eu rope. American
that f Pan g^uard and extend
comes UntU hope be "
firmly and fully realised.
THE OLDEST AND MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED JEWISH PUBLICATION IN THIS TERRITORY
JAX CAMPAIGN TO RAISE $350,000
TO OPEN ON SUNDAY, SEPT. 21st
Sam Wolfson, President of the. Jacksonville Jewish Com
munity Council, and Samuel Kipnis, General Chairman of the
local 1947 United Campaign, have invited hundreds of Jaxons
to a gala opening dinner for Sunday, September 21st, at 6
P. M., at the air-conditioned auditorium of the George
Washington Hotel.
Guest speaker will be Rabbi Herschel Schachter, former
Chaplain, who is famous as the first Rabbi to enter Buchen
wald. It is said that under General Eisenhower’s orders, he
supervised the rescue and transportation of hundreds of Jewish
children from this infamous concentration camp to Switzer
land.
Other officials of this year’s 1947 local campaign include:
P. N. Coleman and Ben Stein, speoial gifts; Ben Yoffee, Harry
Gendzier, and Ike Witten, Men’s Division; Dr. Roy Sloat, Louis
Safer, and Jerry Kipnis, Junior Division; and Mrs. Saul Kurlin,
Mrs. Ben Stein, Mrs. Marx Baker, and Mrs. Joseph Hackel,
Women’s Division. The new executive director of the Council
is Ben Stark.
Jacksonville is expected to do its share in raising the na
tional quota of $170,000,000 for the United Jewish Appeal.
Balfour Declaration, Mandate Did Not Bar
Jewish State, UNSCOP Says
LAKE SUCCESS (JTA) —“Neither the Balfour Declaration nor
the Mandate precluded the eventual creation of a Jewish State,” the
U. N. Special Committee on Palestine says, in a 105-page report to
the General Assembly, made public by the U. N. Secretariat.
"The mandate in its preamble
recognized, with regard to the
Jewish people, the grounds for
reconstituting their National
Home, the report says. By pro
viding, as one of the main obliga
tions of the Mandatory, the facili
tation of Jewish immigration, it
conferred upon the Jews an oppor
tunity, through large scale immi
“Her First Free Rosh Hashonah”
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City Shelter of the Hebrew Shetering and
Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), Rabbi Ezechiel Landau expains the
Tkiath Shofar (commandment to celebrate the New Year) to four
year-old HIAS protegee, Ima Brandsttater, whose family was torn
apart by the Germans when SS troops seized her father, forcing her
and her mother into hiding in the cellar of friendly Christians. Re
united after liberation, the family was brought to the United States
by HIAS, which suppled corporate affidavits and transportation.
They will remain at the HIAS Shelter until they can be resettled.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1947
gration, to create eventually a-
Jewish state with a Jewish ma
jority.
"Both the Balfour Declaration
and the Mandate involved inter
national commitments to the Jew
ish people as a whole,” the report
continues. "It was obvious that
(Continued on Page Nine)
Jewish Leaders Find Refigees
Help itmerican-Jewish Life
JOHANNESBURG (JTA) —Recent Jewish refugee immigration
from Europe to the United States should help to invigorate American
Jewry, and deepen the Jewish content of its life, it was stated here
by Joseph Milne, well-known South African Jewish leader, who has
just returned from a two-and-a-half months’ visit to America, where
he established contact with all major Jewish organizations.
To Address JDC Meeting
In Savannah, Sept. 21
■ t
i
t
i
i

!
t
SHOLOME MICHAEL QELBER
S. Michael Gelber, dynamic
young Canadian who returned re
cently from Bergen-Bc*sen, Ger
many, will be a featured speaker
at the Savannah zone meeting of
the Joinst Distribution Committee,
major American agency aiding
distressed Jews abroad in the
Hotel De Soto, Savannah, on Sun
day, September 21, it was an
nounced yesterday by William P.
Engel of Birmingham, Chairman
of the JDC South East Region,
and Sidney Rosensweig, Chairman
of the Savannah Jewish Council.
The meeting, which will be open
to the public, will be attended by
representatives from Albany, Au
gusta, Columbus, Macon and Sa
vannah, Georgia. No funds toll
be solicited, Mr. Engel pointed
out, since the JDC receives funds
for its overseas relief, resettle
ment and reconstruction programs
from contributions to the $170,-
000,000 campaign of the United
Jewish Appeal.
(Continued on Page Four)
YOM KIPPUR - DAY OF ATONEMENT
SEPTEMBER 24, 1947
The great Day of Atonement of the Jewish religion falls on
Tuesday evening at sundown, September 23rd, and continues until
sundown, Wednesday the 24th. For thfe Jews throughout the world
it is a day of fasting and prayer to stress the value of directing our
daily conduct into finer and more spiritual channels. It is the con
clusion of the ten Penitential Days during which people may find
forgiveness for their sins of omission and commission. The first
step in this process of winning God’s forgiveness, however, is to
make peace with one’s fellow men for any dereliction of conduct of
which one may be guilty.
The afternoon of the Day of Atonement consists of an impressive
Memorial Service during which the names of the departed during
the past year are recalled. The entire congregation then joins in the
memorial prayer to show its spiritual fellowship with all of Israel.
The afternoon scriptural reading is particularly noteworthy. It
consists of the Book of Jonah, the prophet who only became great
when he learned that God’s'forgiveness extends even to people in
far off Ninevah who had never heard of God but were still ready both
to repent and to amend their ways when their sins were pointed out
to them.
"American Jewry was beginning
to lose some of its original vigor
through assimilation," Mr. Milne
declared, "and in the younger gen
eration particularly, many were
drifting away from Jewish life.
The Nazi persecutions, and the
destruction of European Jewry in
the war have re-kindled a strong
er Jewish consciousness, and
brought many young people into
the fold of Jewish 1 activity who
were previously taking no part
in Jewish life. With this awak
ened Jewish consciousness, the im
migrants who have been coming
over from Europe will act as a
Jewishly stimulating force. Some
of the great European Yeshivahs
are now re-establishing themselves
in America. Some of the famous
surviving rabbis and teachers of
European Jewry are in America.
All these will strengthen Ameri
can Jewish life.
“In general,” said Mr. Milne,
“American Jewry is an integral
part of the American scene. They
are Americans, and they share in
all aspects of American life— •
trade, industry, professions, arts
and politics. American Jews
fought throughout the war, and in
every way pulled their weight as
Americans. Many of the refugee
immigrants were most useful in
the war effort. Their specific tal
ents, and knowledge of European
languages and conditions, proved
invaluable.”
HSU
$3.00 A YEAR

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