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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, August 03, 1951, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000090/1951-08-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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AN INDEPENDENT WEEKLY SERVING AMERICAN CITIZENS OF JEWISH FAITH '
“ THE OLDEST AND MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED JEWISH PUBLICATION IN THIS TERRITORY
VOL. 28 NO. 28
PLAIN TALK
By Alfred Segal
MAN ON WAY TO ISRAEL
My friend, Mr. Eli Elias, the
merchant who resides at 835 War
ner Avenue in Los Angeles, drop
ped in on me, as he has been do
ing annually when he is traveling
East on business. He sits at my
desk and we talk of this and that
going on in the world—and
there's plenty of that to talk
about nowadays. Invariably what
Mr. Elias says prompts a column.
This time business was a mere
incident of his journey East. Mr.
Elias’ heart was much more eager
than his mind. His mind practi
cally had dismissed cloaks and
\ suits, underwear, nylons and all
the other things ho sells in his
department store at Huntington
Park, California. .
Mr. Elias' eyes were bright with
a dazzling gleam that was coming
' up out of his heart.
“We are on the way to Israel,”
he said. “My wife and I, that is;”
There would be a couple of
weeks of annoying business in
New York before he would be
starting for Israel: The dreary
business of going around among
the jobbers and manufacturers
and buying things for the fall line.
This no longer seemed to have
the importance that it used to on
Mr. Elias' annual visits to New
York. In New York it would be
only a matter of Mr. Elias' mater
ial affairs, but in Israel it would
be poetry.
Mr. Elias’ feet already seemed
to be dancing to the poetry. He
1 was boyish in his eagerness, like
son starting back to the old
£>mestead to be with mama and
gfpa awhile. The son is grateful
c £ everything that has come to
- in the far-off place to which
Htrneyed in his youth but his
strings pull toward thfe old
® au J where his people lived. It
been like that for Mr. Elias
a !o had come from overseas long
?o and he was grateful for the
mndant goodness of America; it
vas lovely to be going back to
mama’s house.
To the place where it all began:
To Israel and the beginning of the
Jewish religion . . . the temple
. . . the prophets . . . the soul of
' the Jew which grew out of this
50i1... the place where the singer
sang his Psalms. Not to love Is
rael was like despising the old
father and mother whose teach
ings made you the man you are.
, Without being angry with them,
Mr. Elias couldn’t understand
some of the Jewish neighbors who
feel aloof from Israel, almost like
sons ashamed of their parents.
These neighbors are nice, worthy
gentlemen and ladies whose main
lack seemed to be the heart Which
loves the homes of forefathers,
loves to trace familiar footsteps
in old soil.
No, Mr. Elias wasn't quarreling
with these people. His joyous
heart had no room for that as
he made ready for IsraqL He and
these others were all children of
Israel, all brothers together. He
could feel sure the time was com
(Continued on Page 8)
Jewish Grandma Tries Channel Swim
I
u
Mrs. Betty Cohen, 51-year-old Jewish swimming grandmother
from Brooklyn who hopes to ctoss the English Channel received a
warm send-off from her two grandchildren and son before departing
for London. The 5' 5." 164 lb. Mrs. Cohen, believed to be the first
grandmother to make the Channel swim attempt, is shown holding
her granddaughter, Zen a (4) while her grandson (7), and her son Pvt.
Bernard (22) looks on. Her son was given a special furlough to see
her off. Her husband Dr. Harry Cohen is her trainer and coach.
Jewish Leaders Worried:
Iran Blocks Visas For U. 5. Jews,
Isolates JDG Chief; Leaders
Fear Big Exodus
NEW YORK (AJP) Reports
that American Jews have sudden
ly encountered serious difficulties
in getting visas for Iran was add
ed this week to a mounting list
of developments pointing to Iran
as the next Arab state likely to
expel its Jews.
Any mass expulsion of Iran’s
80,000 Jews would pose a tre
mendous new threat to Israel’s
already strained immigration pro
gram.
Another development was the
disclosure that Stanley Abramo
vitz, Joint Distribution Commit
tee official stationed in Teheran,
has ben virtually isolated in' the
Iranian capital. Abramovitz, the ,
American Jewish Press learned,
can no longer leave Teheran with
out police permission.
Both Jewish Agency and Uni
ted Jewish Appeal leaders in the
United States were frankly wor
ried.
The Damascus radio for the
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1951
past month has been steadily pre
dicting that Iran would be the
next Arab country to institute
what it termed “compulsory re
patriation” of its Jews.
Another development which in
creased the worries of Jewish of
ficials about Iran was that state’s
action in closing its consulate In
Jerusalem on July 7. Iran was one
of the few Moslem states which
did not participate in the 1948
invasions c f Palestine.
The effect of a sudden mass
exodus of almost 100,000 Iranian
Jews into Israel was viewed here
as serious. Any such heavy migra
tion added to the steady flow of
refugees now jamming
the Jewish State’s absorbtive re
sources would pose a serious
problem, Jewish officials here ad
mitted.
They expressed hope that any
such mass expulsion by the na
tionalist-pressed Iranian govern
ment could be averted.
U. S. State Department in Rift
Over Aid to Israel
BY MILTON FRIEDMAN
(Copyright, 1951, Jewish Telegraphic
WASHINGTON—
A rift has developed between the economic and political branch
es of the State Department over the question of aid to Israel. The
economists favor aid to Israel and are squarely behind the $150,000,-
000 grant-in-aid bill now pending before Congress. The political sec
tion is fearful that such aid to Israel may offend the Arabs.
%
i
Israel Representative
At U. N. Parley Hits
Policy on Germany -
GENEVA, (JTA) The policy
of “forgive and forget” which
member states of the United Na
tions are carrying out with regard
to Germany’s annihilation of 6,-
000,000 Jews was severely criti
cized here by Dr. Jacob Robinson,
Israel representative at the Uni
ted Nations conference of pleni
potentiaries called to deal with
the status of refugees and state
less persons.
Speaking at the conference, Dr.
Robinson said: “Hitlerite Ger
many waked' two wars—one for
world domination, the other for
the destruction of the Jewish peo
ple. Six million victims, two
thirds of European Jewry, perish
ed. With the division of the world
into two opposing blocks one part
of Germany was gradually drawn
into one camp, the other into the
opposite.
The Israeli representative re
minded the conference that six
years ago Hans Frank, the former
Governor-General of Poland and
one of the major Nazi war crimi
nals, exclaimed—standing at his
trial before the Allied Military
Tribunal—that thousands of years
will pass and the world will not
forget the crime committed by
the Germans against the Jewish
people. *
MAPAI POLLS 39 PERCENT,
GENERAL ZIONISTS 20
AMID COALITION *
GOVERNMENT REPORTS
TEL AVIV (AJP) The
rocketing rise of the middle
class General Zionists to Is
rael's second largest party and
the refusal of Israel's voters in
the second national election
this week to give the Socialist
Mapai an absolute majority
pointed to another uneasy
coalition government for the
.Jewish State.
The General Zionists rose
from fifth place to second, col
lecting about 20 per cent of
the turnout on the basis of in
complete returns from Israel's
military personnel. The soldier
vote will not be tabulated for
several more days.
The left-wing Mapam drew
11.8 of the accounted vote; the
right-wing Herut, an out
growth of the extremist Irgun
Zxai Leumi, accounted for 7.5
per cent; Hapoel HamizraehL
6.3; Progressives, 3.5; Commu
nists, 3.3; Agudah. 2.2; Mix
rachi, 1.2, and Poale Agudah,
1.7 pet cent.

$3.00 A YEAR
The rift is now new. State De
partment economists recall the
opposition of the political section
to the Export-Import Bank loans
to Israel despite the fact that Her
bert Gaston, head of the Export-
Import Bank, strongly recom
mended the loans as good risks
and in the best interest of Amer
ica. It is recalled within the De
partment that Stuart Rockwell,
an official formerly with the Near
Eastern division, vigorously op
posed economic aid to Israel in
more than one intra-departmental
fracas.
State Department economists
are aware that it has been subtly
pointed out by others in the de
partment that there are some
Jews in the economic section.
Williard L. Thorp, Assistant Sec
retary of State for Economic Af
fairs, has stood firmly behind his
economists. They are faithfully
seeking to apply the Truman Doc
trine to the Near East through
the bolstering of such reliable de
mocracies as Israel.
The poor judgment of State De
partment advocates of appease
ment of the Arabs has been
underscored in recent weeks.
There is developing throughout
the Near East a retrogression
from peaceful stability, a reckless
zenophobia accentuated by anti-.
western hysteria. Any Moslem
guilty of such heresies as modera
tion or a desire for peace may
expect assassination. The killing
of King Abdullah of Jordan was
the most recent example of the
spreading of anti-peace activities
instigated throughout the Near
East by Haj Amin el Husseini, the
pro-Hitler agitator who was the
Grand Mufti of Jerusalem.
Haj Amin recently visited
Pakistan, Iran, Syria and Egypt.
His Pakistan visit was followed
by Pakistan-Indian troubles. His
Iranian visit was followed by the
assassination of the Premier of
that country. His Syrian visit was
followed by Syrian aggression
against Israel's northern frontier
and the later shooting of Riad el
Sohl, ex-Premier of Lebanon. His
Egyptian visit was followed by
an intensification of Egypt's Sues
Canal blockade aimed against Is
rael.
The fundamental purpose of
Haj Amin’s organization seems to
be the prevention of peace. The
source of his finances is unknown.
However, Haj Amin’s .adjutant,
Mohammed Dawalibi, is noted for
his Soviet connections. The same
State Department people who ap
peased Arabs like Haj Amin still
grunt and groan when aid is pro
posed to Israel, the most stable.
~~ (Continued on Page 8)

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