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The Southern Jewish weekly. [volume] (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1939-1992, November 07, 1952, Image 1

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THE OLDEST AND MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED JEWISH PUBLICATION IN THIS TERRITORY .
VOL 29 NO. 42
BROADWAY
TALES
by Ben Feingold
A JUST QUERY
Funnyman Larry Best took his
grandmother to her first ball
game at Ebbets Field last sum
mer.
Just as they were seated, the
announcer said, “Gladys Gooding
will now play The National An
them.”
Everyone arose. When the song
was finished, everyone sat down
but Larry’s grandmother.
“Bubba,” Larry said. “You can
sit down now. It’s all over.” But
she persisted in standing. “Why
don’t'you sit down?” Larry asked.
“What’s the matter?” she
haughtily snapped. “ ‘Hatikvah’
they don’t play here?”
FOR SHAME
Lew Tendler, the former light
weight contender, now a Phila
delphia restauranteur, unveiled a
plaque to the late Benny Leonard
in his restaurant the other day. A
GREAT CROWD WAS PRES
ENT. •—^
However, when Benny’s stone
was unveiled in Old Carmel
Cemetery in Ridgewood, Brook
lyn, a few years ago, outside of
his immediate family, a few re
porters, his old loyal manager,
Buck Areton and Sammy Dachs,
a boxing handler and an old
friend—NO ONE ELSE WAS
PRESENT.
TIMES SQUARE BECOMES
HADASSAH SQUARE
Menashe Skulnick claims he’s
a tremendous hit with the ladies,
particularly when it comes to
kissing. “Whenever I go to a
party,” Menashe explains, “the
women all scream, ‘Look at the
kisser! ’” . . . The famous men’s
clothing house of Robinson &
Roberts, in Pa Knickerbocker’s
Towne has such a vast clientele of
comedians that wrestler Abe
Stein, a customer, was constrain
ed to note, “Here’s a twist. In
stead of these comedians buying
material from gag writers, they’re
buying it from a clothing house.”
. . Manhattan Borough President,
in connection with Hadassah
Week, temporarily proclaimed the
Times Square area between 43
and 44th Street, as “Hadassah
Square.” ... A radio program
that has become a tremendous hit
with the Jewish people of New
York and environs, is called
“Songs Os The Synagogue.” It
features leading cantors in folk
and liturgical melodies, over
WEVD every Sunday afternoon
at 2 . . . Many of you no doubt
know that Myron Cohen, the
great dialectician, was a silk
salesman before he became a
great comedian. But how many
of you know that he owned a
Kosher delicatessen called “Hy
mie's,” in the garment district,
where he picked up his vast re
pertoire of dialectic didoes? ...
Comedian Danny Davis saw a
new Bronx television set on the
market two days ago. In case you
get hungry, you can eat it ... It
has halvah knobs . . .
Eban Rebukes
Arabs al U. N.
- ~
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.
(JTA) Ambassador Abba Eban,
head of the Israel delegation at
the United Nations, told the U. N.
Ad Hoc Political Committee this
week that if the Arab countries
did for the Arab refugees what
Israel has done for its new immi
grants, there would be no Arab
refugee problem. He emphasized
that the Arab countries had far
more resources than Israel.
The Israel diplomat sharply re
buked the Arab delegates for
their attacks on Israel during the
debate on the Arab refugee prob
lem. He said that it was Arab
politics ’fohich had prevented the
re-integration of the Palestine
refugees in Arab countries.
In Israel’s view, Mr. Eban
stated, “regional settlement”
would be in the interests of the
refugees, would be just, and
would lead the way to an Arab-
Israel peace. He pointed out that
in the meantime Israel was doing
the‘best it could, with its limited
resources, to help solve this prob
lem of international scope. He
emphasized that Israel’s past
commitments with regard to com
pensation “stand fully valid-”
Mr. Eban said that the Arab
refugees were “in the truest
sense, at home in the Arab coun
tries,” particularly in those with
a shortage of manpower. There
could have been “spontaneous re
integration,” but it had been
“consciously prevented,” he
charged. The Arab governments,
he declared, had initiated “an ill
considered military adventure”
and bore primary responsibility
Chief Participants, National Conference for Israel
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Abba Eban
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Rabbi Irving Miller
frnldtiH, Zionist
Organisation of Amorico
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1952
Israel Conference
Set for Sunday
Top-ranking leaders of
American and Israel Jewry
headed by Abba Eban,. Israel
Ambassador to the United
States, will be among the
principal participants at the
forthcoming National Confer
ence for Israel, Sunday, No
vember 9th, at the Commodore
Hotel, New York City. (See
picture bottom of page.)
The conference will be de
voted to helping develop an
over-all program for the re
habilitation and resettlement
of more than 240,000 recent
immigrants still living under
extremely difficult conditions
in the maabaroth.
Rudolf G. Sonneborn, na
tional chairman of the United
Israel Appeal which is conven
ing the conference, declared
that ‘the delegates will seek to
chart a system of techniques
and procedures to help Israel
expand its absorptive poten
tial.
for the refugee problem. “You
cannot let loose a war and wash
your hands of all responsibility,”
he stated.
Mr. Eban announced that Israel
would support the resolution
submitted by France, Turkey and
the United Kingdom and the
United States, authorizing the
United Nations Relief and Work
Agency to increase its relief bud
get for the present year to $23,-
000,000. He said that this was an
expression of confidence in the
United Nations Relief and Work
Agency. The resolution was car
ried by a vote of 50-0 with seven
abstentions including Iraq.
£■« JL/Jif
Oved Ben-Ami
Mayor
of Natanya
BSiiflß '^>f
||f
Julliet N. Beniamin
Fund-Halting
Coordinator, Hadottoh
' (A' 1 •
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Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz
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Unltod Jowith Appeal
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Ralph Wechtler
Iroa tutor, labor
Zionist* of Amorico
ELECTION RESULTS FORCAST
EARLY McCARRAN LAV ,
REVISION
BY MILTON FRIEDMAN
(JTA Washington Bureau Chief)
WASHINGTON, (JTA) One of the most significant develop
ments to emerge from the presidential campaign is the agreement
by both major parties and their presidential candidates that the
McCarran-Walter Immigration Act, passed by two-thirds of Congress
last June, was a major mistake. The act was vigorously opposed by
national Jewish organizations, minority groups and liberal elements
which considered it discriminatory.
President Harry S. Truman,
who had vetoed the measure in a
stinging condemnation of its
clauses, introduced the issue into
the election and made it one of
the top issues. Gov. Adlai Steven
son and Gen. Dwight Eisenhower
both attacked the law and later
stages in the campaign showed
the issue was one on which many
voters hung. The Perlman Com
mission, appointed by President
Truman to tour the country and
seek popular views of those who
testified favored revision of the
%
WINS AWARD FOR VOICING
FAITH IN UNITED NATIONS
NEW YORK, (JTA) Clara
Shapiro, fourteen-year-old junior
high school girl, who asked “how
can one human being be perfect
ly content, knowing another per
son suffers?” was adjudged the
winner this week in an essay con
test on “Why I Am For the Uni
ted Nations.”
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt and
John Golden, theatrical producer,
were the judges in the contest
conducted by the Board of Edu
cation. There were 27,000 entries.
Clara was presented with her
SIOO prize in a special ceremony
at City Hall.
i fHH
Ir
Sii6/ guglgpßß
Rudolf O. Sonneborn
National Chairman,
Unitod Itraol Appoal
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Or. Pinkhot Churgin
Protidont, Misroehi
Organisation of Amorico
“racist” principles.
Many of the candidates elected
to the Senate and House of Rep
resentatives are pledged to work
for repeal or amendment of the
act. Indications in the capital
were that action for repeal may
be sought in Congress early in
the new session.
McCarran -and Walter
Repudiated by Stevenson
In the course of the campaign,
the act’s author, Sen. Pat. McCar
ran of Nevada was rejected by
President Truman and repudiated
by Gov. Stevenson who consider
ed not only the McCarran im
migration act but also the Mc-
Carran Internal Revenue Act of
1950 as travesties on the liberal
principles espoused by the Demo
cratic Party.
Governor Stevenson also point
edly refused to endorse the can
didacy of Rep. Francis E. Walter,
co-sponsor of the immigration
measure. Although the Pennsyl
vania congressman was on the
platform of the campaign train
with him in the congressman's
home town, the Democratic
standard-bearer refused to ask his
audience to vote for Walter. Wal
ler had complained to news
papermen that Stevenson had
been "ill-advised" on the immi
gration situation and said he had
boarded the train to "straighten
out" the governor.
Gen. Eisenhower, in speeches
also denounced the McCarran im
migration measure and his run
ning mate, Sen. Richard Nixon,
who had voted for the bill and to
override the president’s veto, also
came out for revision.
During the campaign, the Con
troversial immigration act was
defended by the Daughters of the
American Revolution, the Ameri
can Legion, the Japanese-Ameri
can League, the Steuben Society
of America, the Ladies of the
Grand Army of the Republic, the
Society of the War of 1812, and a
few other groups.
Both Parties Agreed on
Israel Aid
Friendship for Israel was ex- 1
pressed by both candidates in y
conformity with the platforms of
their parties. There is no indica
tion that any major change will »
occur in the area of Mutual Se
curity Assistance for Israel. De
spite of the new faces in Congress
and the new occupant in the
White House, every indication
points to the continuation of Fed
eral assistance for the State of
Israel.
$3.00 A YEAR

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