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The labor world. [volume] (Duluth, Minn.) 1896-current, September 12, 1903, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000395/1903-09-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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ISSUED
REGISTERED
Onion
LABEL HATS
an£
SMOKERS
SaPS. union
...ARE YOU AFTER...
IIHUN LABEI CUTIUNt
This Stm9 is where you will find the largest assortment of Uoktn
Label gc&Js at popular prices. Made by the largest and test
manufacturers in the country. We were the first firm ia the
city to ic^roduce the Union Label" on clothing.
Splwlid Spring Suits, $10, $15, $18, $26
Nest, Snappy, Up-to-date Spring (for­
es®1!$ $10, $12, $15, $20
HAVII you TRIED THEM DO SO AND BE CONVINCED THAT THE
La Verdod and La Linda.
CWGAR9 ARB THE FINEST THAT MONET WILL BUY, AND THAT
SKILLED LABOR CAN PRODUCE.
MANUFACTURED BY
Ron Fernandez Cigar Company.
UNION LABEL. HOME HIADE.
WE ARE LEADERS IN
Union Label Cigars
FoSiowlng Are Some of Our Choicest Brands:
Epict o, La Cuba, Leaders, White Ash, Red Cross, Union
Hade Union Hade (hand), Turf Queen, Union Boquet,
Duh £i, Free Cuba, Emblems, Coronation, Navy Pride.
J. J. CULLEN
ana
ffilu? TWthf&tirseaiMiwdiMintailw
I a uttiara cicab makers MmtRwnowL trnioiw am
I vinctmrnt of ttie MORAlAWTtRWuallitUlICIIMlHllfARtOf ....
1
ClMI1,8 411
OTOfcw* throughout tkt MxW.
lfllwgiiM«w#pwtJus UM MtTb* mmM *ceqrdifi« to Mb
Full Set Best Teeth
moo
Zenith Phone 168.
it
srsrery
LABEL GLOMES and/SHOES
W. ERICS0I, S5K
219 West Superior Street.
Two Floors. Perffeet Daylight.
•f
WEST
STREET,
pMIOHIOAN
UMCLE IKE
HAS
Barrels of Money
to Loan
On Watches Diamonds
and Jewelry
524W. Superior St.
See that this label antear« on the box
from which you are served
pt.iftafi—i.—rri ..
noniyoi the Ci(ar Makets' International Unionot AmericaT
Union-made Cigars.
»wi MMtijf* fictCbssMlm
—tateat
CKtuZi
CJfJ t/.fjbmrt*:
OOOS
PITROMIZE HOME INDUSTRY.
SMOKE HOME-MADE CIGARS THAT BEAR THE ABOVE LABEL.
Call and Be Convinced
That we can give you first-class dental
work at reasonable prices.
Gold Crowns. $7.00
White Crowns $5.00
White Fillings 75c
Gold Fillings, up from $1.50
Silver Fillings, up from. 75c
Painless Extracting 50c
JOHNSON& KAAKE,
Mesaba Biock—409-11 W Superior ,Street, Duluth
OLDING
..FOR If
•THE
Xw
YOUR Own
Is a pleasure, when you can hold It
In the brewing of beer that will com­
pete with the best breweries in this
country or Europe in the manufacture
of i»ure, rich and creamy. bottled beer,
that possesses the qualities-of all with
the palatable flavorrand strengthening
qualities of the best beer. Try it .as
an appetizer and tonic—4t is good.
Duluth
CO.
EITHER PHONE 241.
J*-
Twilight was falling, and the village
seemed to awake, from the sultry heat
of the summer day. A horn sounded
the signal for watering: the horses, and
a few minutes later numerous hoof
beats were heard. The dragoons were
taking their horses to the watering
place. Then silence fell on the little
hamlet again.
Outside the village, at the post, the
sentinel Walkow stood under a. little
wooden roof and was bored to death
while watching over the strong box of
the regiment.
'The devil take the service." he
thought, "and this strong box. and the
day which I decided to put on a uni­
form! And why should I keep guard
over this box? The Colonel should take
it into his own room, and then every­
thing would be in order and I should
not have to stand here."
The Full of Constantinople
(From the Russian of Ivan
'JVaschioin.)
His eyes traveled indifferently from
one object to another. At times they
followed a bat. circling over the gran­
aries then two cats sitting on a fence
and miauing pitifully attracted atten­
tion. Then again he admired the won­
derful play of the clouds on the dark­
ening sky. One of them looked like a
dog. another like a walrus, and a
third—Oh marvel—reminded him of the
Colortel of the regiment. And while
Walkow regarded his Colonel, sitting
between the dosr and the walrus, he
hit upon the thought how cood to be a
colonel. In the first place he never
need stand sentinel: in the second
place, the colonel always rides into the
city at thfe head of the regiment, and
all the young women see him: in the
third place it is only a step from col­
onel to general, and besides a colonel
can allow himself a tandem of three
dappled horses: whereas he. Walkow.
would only be lieutenant In a year, and
the tandem was verv. very far in the
future. Well, the pleasure of wearing
a uniform and clinking his spurs in
order to win the hearts of women is
quite extensive.
While these thoughts were going
though Walkow's mind, the dog and
walrus and the commandant had netted
together and formed a dark shapeless
mass, which was by degrees trans­
formed into a fantastic city, with high
towers, cupolas, and minarets. "It looks
exactly like Constantinople.'* thought
Walkow. who had never seen Constan­
tinople: and his thought carried him
into the capital of the Turks.
Suddenly in the twilight he heard the
hoof-beats of many horses, and a few
moments later a whole cavl?ade halted
before him. At the head was his col­
onel and behind him a brilliant crowd
of generals. Walkow saluted. "There
he is!" the colonel said, pointing to
him. The generals saluted Walkow re­
spectfully and shouted "Hurrah!"
"Great God! what is the meaning of
this?" wondered Walkow. and stared
at his commander-in-chief, who was
dismounting.
The grey-haired officer, whom Wal­
kow had seen but once before, was the
first to come toward hi.m carrying in
his hand a golden sword set with pre­
cious stones. "I congratulate you. my
dear sir." said he. "Your heroic deed
of yesterday has not its like in the
whole history of the world. All these
Napoleons. Alexanders, and Hannibals
are in comparison with you. nothing.
You are the pride of the army, the
glory of the czar's dominions. This
golden sword is the reward of your
heroism. Besides, you are promoted to
field marshal, and made governor-gen­
eral of the city, which vou have taken."
The general pointed to far offx Constan­
tinople whose minarets werex glittering
in the rays of the noonday sun,
"Aha! It's all on account of yester­
day," Walkow reflected. "To be sure!
How could I have forgotten?"
Yesterday something quite extraor­
dinary had. taken place. His regiment,
together with others, had been standing
A NOVELIST FOR THE
LABOR MOVEMENT
(By Herbert N. Casson, "in Boyce's
Weekly.)
The great need of the labor move­
ment at the present time is for a novel­
ist—an American Zola—who can des­
cribe in the form of a story the great
struggle for better conditions that is
being made by the wage-working
masses of our large cities.
In 1851, before "Uncle Tom's Cabin"
appeared, there were very few who real­
ized the horrors of slavery. The average
human mind works about as fast as
cold molasses in getting a new idea,
and there were even in the South thou­
sands of tenderhearted men and women
who took slavery as a matter of course
and a divine institution.
But Mrs. Stowe's book woke up the
nation. For the first time the American
people heard the crack of the lash and
saw the wife torn from her husband's
arms. Every one recognized the moral
superiority of Uncle Tom to Legree.
"Why, these negroes are human "beings
like ourselves," said the surprised read­
ers. Thus the novel succeeded where
the other books failed. Everybody read
it, and in a few years it had created
anew public opinion which made eman­
cipation inevitable.
However much we may lecture and
editoralize, it is the story which reaches
people after all. It was Sir Walter
Scott's stories that did more to interest
the world in the Scotch Highlands than
the volumes of all the learned histori­
ans. It was Washington Irving's story
of Rip Van Winkle that first gave ro­
mance to the Catskills. The stories of
Charles Dickens did most of all in his
generation to reform the schools and
law-courts, and to awaken an interest
in the lives of the common people of
England. All the prospectuses and pam­
phlets of all the land-boomers and .min
in gagents have not done as cuh to
advertise the eWstern states -as the.
stories of Bret Harte.
If the fair-minded American people
could once realize what a ten per cent
increase means to the home of a fac­
tory worker who has five children and
his aged parents to support if they
could see in a series of moving pictures
the gradual breakdown of a beautiful
young girl in an unhealthy cotton fac­
tory if they could see from the insile
the heroic struggles of a body of work­
ers to maintain their union against the
united opposition of almost a whole
city, our industrial system would soon
be put upon a different footing.
No writer ever had better material
for a story than that which can be
found in any large factory city. A force­
ful story teller like Kipling, but with a
heart as well- as- a brain,-, could. go to
Paterson or Lowell or Fail River,.-re-"
main "ior a year, and write, the mo^t
powerful book of the century!" He could
be a maker of history, an uplifter of
nations, a moulder of civilization.
The difficulty is not in finding the
material, but in finding the writer.*
None of the smart flippant pen-pushers?
who regard ideas as marketable com-»
11L-."'.IJ. ....J1
for several months before the walls of
Constantinople. The cannon growled
incessantly from the: sea came the re­
ply of- the Russian squadron, but all
in vain the. city would not capitulate
in spite of. the fact that the inhabitants
were dying of hung6r. Fnally the
Turks had resolved to make a last des­
perate sally, and to6k advantage of the
exhaustion of the Russian army, which
in a beating rain, had Spent two sleep­
less nights in constant "skirmishing
with the enemy.
Yesterday, then, at daybreak, the
Turks burst out of the city. But Wal­
kow was prepared for them. He had
hardly perceived the head of the col­
umn before his sword was drawn, and
in spite of the remonstrances of his
captain, had thrown himself upon the
enemy, carrying his whole squadron
with him. When the Turks saw this
haiu'ftil of dare-devils" they began to
tremble and retreated. Walkow took
advantage of the confusion and rushed
straight into the midst of the enemy's
army. Fifty thousand to the left, fifty
thousand to the right, and in the mid­
dle. WalkoW. cutting and slashing and
shouting. Five minutes later the Turks
fled like sheep in all directions.
The.v implored WalkoW to spare them
but he no longer paid attention to them.
At the head of his- squadron he flew for­
ward into the city. Ten minutes later
the flag with the crescent came down,
and in its place the Russion colors
proudly unfolded themselves.
In an instant Walkow had remem­
bered all this. Suddenly he heard soft
foot steps and a woman in a rustling
silk dress approached Him smiling. "I
congratulate you, Marshal," she said
to him. "I was so happy when I heard
that you were the inimitable hero of
yesterday. I have always believed that
there was a genius hidden in you. In
your eyes, in ^our moustache, there is
so much intrepidity, force, and courage,
I have always loved you, as if you
were—my son!"
In a dignified attitude, he replied: "I
thank you, gracious lady I am very
happy
A beautiful, snow-white Arab in rich
trappings, was then led forward. Wal­
kow sprang into the saddle, and bow­
ing gracefully, to the lady, he rode off,
accompanied by the generals, to Con­
stantinople, where the Russian army
was drawn up before the walls. To
the right, on a hill several ladies were
standing. One of them stepped for­
ward and came up to Walkow with a
golden wreath in her hand. The beau­
tiful lady bowed to the Field Marshal,
and said. "For the^-fjreat hero, in the
name of the Russian women." Wal­
kow dismounted, took off his shako,
and she placed the wreath on his bow­
ed head. A loud hurrah went up from
the army, the* regiment bands played,
and the cannons roared: the ladies
waved their handkerchiefs and kissed
their hands: the Colonel himself salut­
ed respectfully with his sword, rode
up to him, and shouted in fury:
"What the devil! How he snores!
In arrest, for a week—a'month—a year!
To snore by the strong box!
The Field Marshal could not under­
stand why the Colonel was shouting
so. The latter, took him by the should
er and shook him furiously. "Go to
the devil with your snoring! Walkow!
Wake up, or
Walkow drew himself up proudly.
"Is that the way to sneak to a field
marshal?" Then he shouted sternly,
"To the whipping post with him at
once!"
"Who? What? Whipping post?"
screamed the Colonel. "In arrest at
once, or the devil take you."
At last Walkow ooe'h'ed his eyes. Be
fore him stood his Colonel, purple with
wrath, and the sentinel who was to
replace him.
.. ,• ..
a true book-must-himself be true. To
do justice to his- task he must be as
sincere and fearless as Zola, as sym­
pathetic as Dickens, and as open
minded as Whitman: For a while, at
least, he must become a worker him­
self in one of the great modern fac­
tories. He must go through the ordeal
of a strike side by side with the men
and women whom he describes.
To write such a book would not be
easy, but it would be to all otfier Ameri­
can navels what Niagara Falls is to a
stage rain storm.
The Automobile and the Cart Horse.
From the Smart Set:
A Swift Automobile once swept
proudly past a. Tired Cart Hor&e.
"Hello, Old Sti.ck-in-the-Mud!" it
called tauntingly. "Pack to the Bone
yard, you Dead One." So saying, it
disappeared in a cloud of steam.
A little further down the Pike, the
Tired Cart Horse came upon the Swift
Automobile, now busted.
"Aha!"-said the Steed, with a Horse
Laugh, "who is 'Stick-rin-the-Mud1
now? You are indeed far from your
Happy Home."
While the Cart Horse was thinking
up other Biting Sarcasms of this Na
ture, they hitched him up to the Dam­
aged Vehicle and he was compelled to
yank it. laboriously to the stable, four­
teen miles away on an Up Grade.
This fable teaches us that it is
Wrong to gloat over the Downfall of
our Enemies, until we are sure they
can no longer injure, us.
Giving Up.
From the Washington Evening Star:
"Does your husband take your ad­
vice?" said the" inquisitive relative.
"Yes, indeed," answered young Mrs,
Torkins. "I told him months ago
that he ought to give up playing the
races, and he informs ihe that he has:
been giving up ever since."
The Cry on Deaf Ears.
From the Washington Post
TM5ss Stone has heroically resisted
that Mai edonian appeal for help.
For Tillmanites.
From-the Hartford Post:
We should think that. South Carolina
would yearn to be operated on for Till
manitis.
As Most of Us Have Found Out.
From' the Philadelphia Ledger:
The ansas definition "of a gold mine
is "a hole in the ground owned by a
man who is a liar."'
Kenturck Economy,
From, the Chicago News:
When a Kentucky man -wants- to
practice ecpnomy he takes three 10
cent drinks instead of two 15-cent Ones
New York's Opinion Not Sought.
From the'Kansas City Star:
New theatrical productions are num
6rous/ at this time 'of the year and it
Is quite notable that very few of them
are being made in New York, this sea
son. Every ?year the tendency to sub­
mit new plays' and operas to other
cities rather than New York has grown
stronger. "The New-York stamp of ap
H'oval neA er was particularly reliable
and a Ms begoin^ le&s sp in. recent
aUo\vy(i^^ ctJbns.'^L"i:i,
WS* tv, S1
THE HIGHER COURAGE!
(From address of Moorfield Storey to
•the American Peace Society:)
'We are told that those' who recog­
nize the. brotherhood of man, who do.
riot consider it a proof of5 lofty soul to
use a giant's strength like a giant
against our weaker neighbors, are
'weaklings' and 'cowards.' Was the
man who wrote the 'Farewell Address'
coward, and are- the sentiments of
that address those of a weakling? Is
the man who believes that Washington
was right a coward
"Three is a higher courage than that
Which is the common property of the
bulldog and man.
"It is the courage which John How­
ard showed when he risked his life in
the foul jails of Europe for the pur­
pose of bringing relief to the poorest
and meanest the world knew. It ds the
courage shown by the district attorney
of St. Louis against all the powers
financial, political and social in that
community, who is bringing the bribers
to justice.
"It is not the duty of a mighty nation
to dominate the ocean, which is the
common highway of all nations. No
nation, and no man, ha sa right to con­
trol that which is the common property
of the race. No man, and no nation,
has a right to force his ideas by arms
or by brutality upon an unwilling peo­
ple Simiply because they are weak and
he is strong. We may easily read in
the ruins of Rome, in the sands which
cover Palmyra and Carthage, and in
the prostration of Spain, the fate of
Other nations just as mighty in their
day as the United States is now, who
are Wthe sword of aggression and per­
ished by the sword.
"It is undoubtedly true that there are
occasions when nations, like men, must
defend themselves, their liberty, and
their national existence.
"But it is the man or group of men
who engage great nations in war to win
power or to retain it, to achieve per­
sonal distinction, to make money by
extending commerce, or to force their
social or religious or political ideas up­
on their weaker neighbors, against
whom enlightened public opinion must
always be directed.
"There is no greater criminal than
the man who for his own advantage is
willing to expose thousands of his fel­
low creatures to death and wounds, to
subject their wives and children to be­
reavement and sorrow and all the suf­
fering that follows war and its inevita­
ble attendants, pestilence and famine,
and who then points to the rank or the
office which he has won.
"We know that General Sherman
spoke the truth when he said, 'War is
we cannot understand how any can
justify themselves in seeking directly
or indirectly to bring hell on earth."
Of Course!
From the Des Moines Register and
leader:
Jupt when all the fraternity was re­
joicing over the fact that in Boston
an editor had been able to live in such
a way that he could enjoy the luxury
of death from gout comes the news
that he inherited it.
Sub^ctr*ibe forvthe Lajhwr WprJ.$1^
THE ONE CAUSE
Nature originates and destroys.
The destructive process begins with the fermen
tatioa and decay of blood corpuscles.
The cause of this fermentation is from Bacteria
or microbes In the system.
"I he fomentation does not take place without
air, heat and moisture—for the germs or
microbes are living organisms, that multiply
in myriads with greai rapidity.
These microbes when fully developed, colonize in
great numbers and attack the various vital
organs of the body by feeding on die tissues
thus producing inflammation which is sick­
ness.
If there were no microbes there would be no fer­
mentation* hence there would be no sickness
life would continue indefinitely} suffering
brought about by ill-health would cease and
the processes of nature would stagnate.
To tikis law man Is no exception, and in it is the
secret cause of ail disease.
No sickness can come on without microbes In
the blood.
THE UNIVERSAL CAUSE OF DISEASE IS MI­
CROBES WHICH PILLAGE AND DESTROY.
It Kills the.
Microbes
s4#«K.fcrttl«,tt.
of the Thro*t and cure*
of the Lungs and cures
of the Kidneys and cures
AT FONDULAC.
Most Beautiful Spot in Minnesota.
TAKE THE
NEWSBOY M. day
Grounds Free to Patfdns of Newsboy. Others will be
charged 10 cents.
NO LIQUOR SOLD ON GROUNDS.
Refreshments setved on grounds at reason­
able prices. Free nursery for children. No
worry for mothers. Come and have an out*
Let Yoar Money Work in the
Human Blood to Health Bo*
larged 1,000 Timea.
Mil
Hnmau Blood Fall of Germi
Enlarged i,oo* Timet.
Enlightened Science Admits that aH Sickness is Caused by
GERMS OR BACTERIA
Poisoning: and Wasting the Blood, the Tissues and Vital Organs.
THE ONLY UNIVERSAL REMEDY, FOUNOED ON THE GERM THEORY OF DISEASE,
AND FULLY PROVEN BY TWENTY YEARS OF SUCCESS, IS
RADAM'S MICROBE KILLER
A PLEASANT TART DRINK ABSOLUTELY HARMLESS.
mm
A
of the Skin and cures EvZcMA*
BRONCHITIS.
CONSUMPTION.
JAS. SIMPSON, Mgr.
SAVINGS BANK
Open Saturday evenings from 6 to 8.
Novel Theory of Marriage.
From the Indianapolis Journal:
During the hearing of a divorce case
before Judge Leathers, in which Lola
De Wire sought to have the existing
relations between herself and her hus­
band, Charles, severed, a novel reason
for marriage was given.
During her testimony she was asked
by Attorney Leach: "Did you not love
your husband when you married him?"
"No. sir: -I didn't." was the emphatic
reply,, of" Mrs. .De Wire, "^piya.did?ypg
IE CAUSE AND CURE
OF DISEASE EXPLAINED
THE ONE GURE
BRIQHT'S DISEASE.
kk™»«S^WCATARRH,RHEUriATISM,
A uuid all other Blood
WYlNCfclK «nd Ctarwrfc Dbcwe
Full particulars with reports of Scientific Experiments and
^Convincing Testimoirtals of Wonderfiil Cttres malled free to
•ny address on application.
RADAM'S MI0R0BE KILLER CO.
1698. Canal Street,/ CHICAGO. On? Qal. Jug, *3.
And Make Money for You
'JQCL Interest paid on
Savings Deposits.
Our "Home Savings Banks" will help you save. Why not try it?
Dulttth Savings Bank
No. 2J6 West Superior St.
marry him, then?" asked the aTtorn«»y.
"Well, you see," said the plaintiff, "ha
just kept comin' around every night
and botherin' me so that Anally I mar­
ried him to get rid of him."
The two could not, for various rea­
sons, get on well together, so the court
granted a legal separation.
S. I. Levin, importer of wines and li­
quors, at 501 West Superior street,
carries the very best stock i- the city
toe
family smd, medicinal purposes.
As the cause of all diseases is conclusively proven
by every authority to be fermentation in the
blood, produced by germs and microbes,
common sense dictates that if the microbes
were destroyed &e caw xmdibt removed.
The only known iidpk powerful enough to
destroy the microbe in the bta**, harm­
less as water to the
tissues, wa«
discovered
.H
if
by
the learned scientist and microscopist, Prof.
Wm. R*dam. Its peculiar character is that
of a true antiseptic and germicide, and its
fame is world-wide under the name of
"Radam's Microbe Killer."
It has withstood the most critical scientific exam­
inations and is endorsed by every eminent
medical authority.
As all disease originates from the same source,
microbcM Radam's Microbe Killer prevents
and cures EVERY DISEASE by destroying
Bacteria the organic life that causes fermen­
tation and decay of blood corpuscles. Kills
the germs, and nature, through rich, red
blood, kills the disease.
THE UNIVERSAL CURE FOR
DISEASE IS TO KILL
THE MICROBES WHICH PR0DUC& IT.

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