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The labor world. [volume] (Duluth, Minn.) 1896-current, July 03, 1909, Image 3

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That Hat
Wf:
'iMv
Our new Spring blocks and
flapges are here, and now is
your opportunity to buy the lat­
est styles and shapes In Union
Made Hats.
DONT WAIT—ORDER NOW.
C. VOLLAND, Sz?,
24 First Avenue East.
Both Phones.
GEO. G-. MOOSBRUGOER.
SUCCESSOR.
IF YOU YE
NEVER WORN
SLICKER
you've yet
to learn tHe bodily
comfort it gives In
the wettest weather
MADE FOR——
HARD
——AND
GUARANTEED
WATERPROOF
*322
AT ALL GOQD STORES
CATALOQFMt
NEW
THEATER.
^•BHaBaSBSSK
•sm *r R«ftm4 Vaiderilk.
ILLUSTRATED
tones,
•ovine
PICTURES.
a SHOWS DAILY a
PRICItmiUITTHI MA88BI
mm\m
ELECTRIC COMPANY
Furnish Electric Currents
for
LIGHT AND POWER.
UNION MADE BEER
OF AMERICA,
TRADE ilARK REGISTERED
Bears This Label on
the Keg.
s-
U.
A.
L.
Marshaijl
Weujs
Hardware CO,
Whole- Hard-
sale VWRE
tUIiUTHi
First National Bank
PRINTING
BANKIlff PRINTING 00.
SUCCESSORS TO
A.
J. LYLE PRESS.
221-228 West Superior St
AXA BUILDING-.
Tie Uptoa Iabel Fualahcd oa a
Work.
OilF Strictly Blcbt-Hon
U| Office tm Dnlatk.
Hour PrtMt-
SmoKe CLUB ROOM
Union Label Fire Cent CIGARS.
DULUTH CANDY CO.
Distributors.
ta Follette's
Weekly Magazine
Tbis publication is devoted to pub­
lic interests, upon broad and progress­
ive lines. It will discuss Men and
Measures fearlessly, and publish the
records of public officials and politi­
cal parties impartially.
Senator R. HI. La Foilette, Editor
Price $1.00 a year
You can get the Magazine and
The LABOR WORLD
Both One Year
OfDuluth.
Capital $500,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits $1,300,000.
For $1.25 In Advance
Send In your order to the
The LABOR WORLD
AND NOT TO
La Follette,s
Weekly Magazine
FIRST ISSUE JANUARY 7th, 1909.
GOVERNMENT DEPOSITARY.
ORDEAN, Pra. W. J. JOHNSON,
David Williams, Vice-Pies. W. W. Wells, Ass*t Cashier.
J. H. DIGHT, Cashier.
3 per oent interest paid on Savings and Time Deposits,
/TOE'
CITY NATIONAL BANK
of duluth
Invites your patronage of any or all of tlid following
named departments of the institution:
Saving's Department Gbxnmar^
Ladies' Department. Safety Deposit Department*
UNITED STATZ^GOVlSBNAlKirr DEPOSITARY.
9
McCALL PATTERNS
Celebrated for style, perfect fit, simplicity and
reliability nearly 40 years. Sold in nearly
every city and town in the United States and
Canada, or by mail direct. More sold than
any other make. Send for 'free catalogue.
McCALL'S MAGAZINE
More subscribers than apy other'-'fashion
magazine—million a month. Invaluable. Lat
est styles, patterns, dressmaking:, millinery,
plain sewing, fancy needlework, nairdressing,
etiquette, good stories, etc. Only GO cents a
year (worth double), including a free pattern.
Subscribe 'today, or send f$r sample copy,
WONDERFUL INDUCEMENTS
to Agents. Postal brings premium catalogue
and new cash prize offers. Address
THE MeCALL CO.. 238 to 348 W. 37th Sfc. HEW TOIK
AM
Cashier.
arthiiht for
if WOMEN FAIL
11 POUTt SOCIETY
'7
To Talk Well Is of More Import­
ance Than to Sing
Well.
Women Should Give More Atten­
tion to the Modulating
tof
Their Voices.
A woman who, after years of hum­
ble living' In the Middie West, was
wafted unexpected to Newport on the
wings of sudden wealth, and there
succeeded in "making good," is said
to -have done so with the aid of a
trainer—a social trainer, of course.
This trainer, when asked what was
the first thing he taught the invader,
said:
"To be quiet. She had a habit of
calling her servants, her children—
whomever she wanted to speak to.
She is of an energetic, bustling dispo­
sition the first thing she had to learn
was to make no more noise than was
absolutely necessary. Then' I en­
gaged an elocution teacher for her.
You wouldn't believe the improvement
he made in her voice."
In commenting on the circumstances
Harper's Bazar points out the fact
that women can have, free elocution
lessons by taking some thought and
trouble about it. "When we go to
church or to a lecture, to a club meet­
ing or a political meeting, we can lis—
•teen attentively to the men 'and wom­
en who speak well and try to learn
from them what qualities to cultivate,
while from the bad speakers we shall
learn to be on the lookout for the
same faults In ourselves and try to
overcome or at least to modify them.
'It is far more Important for the
average woman that she should talk
well than that she should sing well.
People are not forced to listen to your
singing, but your friends, your family,
your fellow citizens have -to hear you
talk.
'Avoid making unnecessary noise.
Be as nearly noiseless in your house
as you can be, so shall your neighbors
bless you and your landlord refrain
from raising your rent..
"Never call to your children or your
servants. If they are In another part
of the house, either ring for them or
go and find them. A screech is an
offense against humanity. If you are
In a hotel or train, or in any public
place, maintain that golden silence
whioh should be the Ideal of every
traveler."
PROPER METHOD OF
SWEEPING A ROOM
To sweep a room Is little, but to
get it ready for sweeping takes Some
time. Each upholstered piece of fur­
niture should be carefully brushed
and the plain polished surfaces wiped
with a: slightly damp cloth, then
rubbed with a dry one and moved out
of the room. A paint brush is excel­
lent to remove the dust that will lodge
In carved parts, or If hi the crevices a
very tiny brush or a wooden skewer
can be used. If there are moldings
at the top erf the wall, use a loqg
sandled brush, if it is perfectly clean
if it isn't, tie a dusker over it. Treat
the celling and walls in the same way,
says "Woman's Life."
Do not open the windows till the
actual sweeping is finished, or the cur­
rent of air will scatter the dirt over
the room again.
Sprlnk salt or tea leaves on the
floor and work from the the corners
to the center of the room. The stroke
should be long, the broom always on
the floor pushing the dirt before it,
not setting it in motion by swinging
It around.
The Treatment of Carpets.
Carpets that are often taken up can
be cleaned in the following way,
which raises no dust and leaves the
carpet looking very bright and fresh:
Get a "bucket of lukewarm water, to
which liquid ammonia in the propor­
tion of a tablespoonful to two gallons
has been added. Dip a clean house
flannel in this, wring It as'dry as you
can and wipe' the carpet with the
grain. The dirt and dust will collect
in lumps before your flannel. The
cloth needs further frequent rinsing,
and the water must be changed as
soon as it gets dirty.
After the room has been' swept and
any dust there may be has settled,
the woodwork should be wiped with a
damp cloth, using a little whiting on
the cloth for dirty places in the case
of paint, or turpentine on a dry cloth
for varnish.
Don't forget that the pictures need
dusting, the badks as well as the
fronts.
See that everything is moved for
dusting. Dusty rims around orna­
ments proclaim a careless housekeep­
er. The best plan is to have the first
duster slightly damp, and finish oft
with a dry one.
WASHING RUGS AND' CARPETS.
A preparation, for washing'rugs and
can&ts is made of four ounces of
good white soap dissolved in four
ounces of boiling water when cool
add five ounces of ammonia, two and
a half ounceB of alcohol,
A
f.wo
and a
half ounces of glycerine and two
ounces of ether or chloroform. Bottle
and cork tightly..
To clean a carpet, add a teaspoon
ful of the preparation to a- pall of
tepid water and wring the soap from
this. The sam epreparation will also
clean men's clothes.
Two tablespoonfuls to a pint of wa­
ter will remove the most obstinate
stains.
Matting should be washed wlthh
strong salt water to strengthen the
fiber.
If a white or cream-colored mat­
ting has become faded, wash with
strong soda water and, while this-will
turn it a dteper Shade of creamy yel­
low. It will'be all one-color instead of
Variegated. /.
yatHng iftoiiM tttagje be- swept V&'
'IFrf-
way of the weave, not across It,
If some of the figures in the pattern
have become dingy, A' they v* can hi
brightened by rubbing dye' lnto the
matting with an old toothbrush, fol­
lowing the lines of the figures, which
can be strengthened with a pencil be­
fore applying, the. dye.
SEWING HINT8.
When making buttonholes In mate­
rial always choose a. thread twenty
numbers coarser than that which you
would naturally use in that material.
For instance, if you are sewing a piece
of material with No, 80 cotton, you
can worlt the buttonholes with No. 60.
To prevent the thread from knot­
ting when doing hand sewing always
make a knot In the end last broken
from the spool. This done, stretch the
thread by taking the ends and giving
several quick pulls.
A little tin ruler is much easier to
use than the tape measure for the
measuring of little things, such as
bands, hems and tucks.
If you sew a. waistbone up the back
of a' tape measure for the first ten
Inches you will have a means at hand
to rapidly measure skirt lengths and
lines for trimming.
few paper clips are invaluable in
the sewing basket,' for' they may
hold together scraps, pieces or pat­
terns and bits of lace.
Some thumb tacks," such as artists
and draughtsmen use will be found
an Invaluable help in the sewing
room, You will-need them to fasten
long gores of /slipper silk to your lap
board or cutting table.
CH0IC2 RECIPES FOR
THE HOUSEKEEPER
Selected, Purloined and Gathered from
the Best Culinary Authorities
of the Day.
Virginia Mixed Pickles.
Take half a pint of green tomatoes
sliced and chopped, twenty-five cu­
cumbers "chapped, fifflteen .large
onions chopped fine, two large heads
of cabbage cut up as for slaw and
•mix al ltogether thoroughly. Put a
layer of this in a jar, sprinkle with
salt, and do this until the pickle is all
used up. Let it stand twenty-four
hours, then drain and put in weak
vinegar as will cover your pickle, and
also one pint of scraped horseradish,
hal fan ounce of powdered cinnamon,
two ounces of tumeric, a quarter of a
pound of black. pepper, half a. pound
of mustard seeed, one pound of sugar
and one ounce of celery seed. Mix all
together, then put in the pickle and
let come to a good boil. Put in jars
and cover well.
New England Tomato Pickle.
Chop a peck of gr^en torhatoes and
arrange in layers lh a stone crock,
sprinkling each layer with Salt, using
in all not more than a cupful of salt.
Let stand overnight, and in the morn­
ing strain away liquet* and add to
•the tomatoesyahoutL quarts of /ln
egar, to which' ha^foeen added a fcable-£
spoonful jgaeh of cloves cinnamon,^
ginger and allspice and six Chopped"
green peppers, the- seeds and white
pulp having been removed. Bring all
this to a boil, then simiper s!prwly far
foUr or five hours, adding a few min­
utes before it done two and a.half
pounds of brown. sugar. You ..'may
obtain a different, result by substitut­
ing ripe tomatoes for green. In con­
sistency it will be. a little thicker and,,
a little rougher than the ordinary cat­
sup.
Pickled Spanish Onions.
English recipes: Choose the small­
est onions, and peel them carefully, re­
moving the two outer layers of skin
then cover them well with cold salted
water (see that the salt is well dis­
solved before adding to the onions).
Let them soak for twelve hours. Add
to the vinegar black peppercorns,
mustard seed, horseradish and brown
sugar let boll and then add the
onions. Skim while- boiling, then let
it get quite cold. Take out the onions
and darln them, placing them in Jars
pour the vinegar over them, cork
tightly and tie down. They n$ed quite
a long keeping before they are fitfl for
the table.
Pickled' Damsons.
English recipe: Take one quart of
Damson plums, wipe them dry and
prick with a needle and put them in a
Jar. Boil one gill of vinegar and onev
pound of sugar together and pour
over them. Let them stand twenty
four hours then boll them, (but do not
let the skins burst. Season with
cloves,, cinnartion and other slices.
Close the jars tightly. They will be
ready in about six weeks. Close the
Jars tightly. They will be ready In
THE CHERRY FAD.
HE ^uhSon wrinkle of the moment ls^ to wear
cher||«s aii^ a bunch the aiyaM^^M
/.^ a.,.,.-
Pickled PsaohoJ®^
To elglit pounds of ratfieF "small,
firm' peaches, allow three pounds of
sugar, one quart of viiiegar, three tea
spoonfuls of cinnamon,, the same
amount of mace and allspice mixed
and twice as many whole cloyes as
you have peaches. Rub the down off
the fruit and stick two whole cloves
in each. Heat the spices, sugar and
vinegar to 'the boiling, point, drop in
the peachep and cook ten minutes.
Remove the peaches with a skimmer
strain the syrup, return to the fire
and cook down to a thick syrup. Pack
•the peaches in a glass or stone jars,
cover with the boiling syrup and' seal.
Pickled Pineapple.
Pick the pine from the center with
a fork and cover with a syrup made
in the proportion of two pounds erf
sugar, two cupfuls of cider vinegar
and half a cupful of mixed whole
spices^ Tie the spices In a bag and
boil them iip in the syrup, removing
all scum fro *ithe top. Then turn .the
boiling syrup over the fruit and leave
overnight. The next morning, and
for three consecutive mornings,- repeat
the process, reheating the syrup and
turning it back and boiling hot over
the fruit each time. The syrup should
be allowed to boil two or three min­
utes each time that it goes on the
stove.
pickled Nasturtium Seed.
These make an excellent substitute
for capers. The seeds should be
picked green, with a bit of their stents'
left on them. Soak them in weak salt
and water for a couple of days, and
then in clear water for twenty—four
hours. Drain them, and put them in
jars and cover with boiling vinegar.
They will be ready for use in five Of
six weeks.
Green Grape Catsup.
Select grapes just beginning to turn.
Stem, scald and strain. To five
pounds of grapes allow two and a
half pounds of brown sugar, one pint
of vinegar, one tablespoonful each of
salt, pepper, cloves, cinnamon and 'all­
spice. Tie the spices in a little, piece
of muslin. Boil uritil rather thick and
seal immediately.
Peach Catsup.
Pare and quarter eight quarts of
ripe peaches. Simmer the parings for
thirty minutes in one pint of water.
Then strain, add the peaches to the
liquor and simmer for thirty minutes
longer. Add one and a half cupfuls
of best cid^r vinegar, h£lf a cupful of
sugar, two teaspoonfuls of ground cin­
namon and half a teaspoonful each of
cloves, mace and pepper. Simmer
slowly until rather thick and seal hot'
in pint jars.'
Spiced Cranberries.
Boll three pounds of brown sugar
•jvitai two cupfuls of vinegar, two ta—
bdespoonfuls each of whole allspice and
cinnamon and one tablespoonful of
whole cloves. Simmer them gently
for thirty minutes, and then strain
them and return to the fire. Add five
pounds of, cranberries and slinmer
gently for two hours. If they are put
in a covered jar. and kept in a cool
place they will keep a long time.
Cranberry Marmalade.
Stew two cupfuls of cranberries in
three cupjDuls,. of ^euterJuntil they are
veiry soft. Rub them through the, col­
ander and return to the fire, with two
Quarts, of apples' (pee&d, quartered'
ahd cored) and 'one* pound of' seeded
raisins.- Stew them, very gently for'-«n'
hour, stirring them frequently,' and
then add four cupfuls of sugar, ahd
continue the gentle cooking for an
hour longer, with frequent stlrringb.
Pack In small Jars and store in a
cool, dry place.
StufFed Apples.
Select large, tart apples, core them
neatly and pare them, and then fill the
cavities with he following: Stone a
dozen dates, and, with half a cupful of
nut meats, put them through the food
chopper, or simply chop' them 'fine.
Mix. well and fill the cavities in the
apples. Arrange them in an earthen­
ware baking dish distribute a lemon
in "thin slices over them and add .a
cupful of sugar.- Put In a moderate
oven and cook until they are tender
without losing their shape. When
ready to serve, arrange thean carefully
on a glass dish, pour the syrup over
the mand send to table*
Citron Preserves.
Pare the rinds and cut them into
shapes. Boil in weak alum water
until tender and green, then lay In cold
water. If not tender and green enough
repeat this arid boil in clear water to
extract -the taste of the alum. Then
lay agdln in cold., water. To every
pound of rind allow one and a quarter
pounds of^sugar and one pint of wa­
ter. Add a little orange and- lemon
peel and a little ginger. Boil all to­
gether one hour, or until the inside of
the rind Is transparent and covered
with blisters. If the syrup is too
thick, add water.
Peach Sherbet.
Boil one quart of water and two
a
white hat wtA
National
Bunting 5c a
yard at wash
Goods Dept.
Our $2
9 SEND YOUR MAIL ORD
&.A HT-11B WEST SUPERIOR STREET, UULUTH, MINN.
FOR QUICK, SATISFACTORY SERVICE.
mm
cupfuls of sugar together then add
one quart of peach juice and the juice
of one lemon, and also the well-beaten
whites of t^ro eggs. Freeze.
FEDERATED TRADES ASSEMBLY—Xee
second and fourth Friday of each month
at Kalamazoo Hall, 18 W. Superior street.
President, S. S. McDonald Vice president,
Bdw. Blackwood financial apcretary-treaa
urer, Wm. Perry recording-secretary, R.
Jones, 224 2nd Ave. E. reading Clerk, Oeo.
Northfleld..
STRUCTURAIi BCODINO TRADKS A Us­
ance—Meets first and third Monday at
Kalamazoo Blk. President. Jaa. H. Power
Vice President, W. A Hunt recording
secretary, William Harouor. Smithvllle
financial «ec.trtea.. Geo. 7. Walter*.
It OS W. Fourth St. Business Agent, M. J.
Harney, Residence, 919 B. Sixth St. Office,
Kalamasoo Blk.. Office-hours 8 to I a.
BREWERY WORKERS' UNION, No. 18&
—Meets the fourth Saturday of each
mbnth at Sloan's Hall, Twentieth avenue
west and Superior street. President, Ben
Buchell vice president, Adam Stengleln
recording and financial secretary, Frank
Nichols, 4108 West Fifth street treasurer,
Axel Gafoert.
CIOABMAJKKRS* DKIOS JIO. «M—l(eete
fir§t and third Wednesdays of each month
at Kalamazoo BIdg., Is W.:Superior street.
President, H. Pereault vice president.
Frank Heldeman financial 'sacretary-treas
urer, Jacob Patskowski, 611 B. Second St.
recording-corresponding/ secretary, John
Oakes, care llon-Fernandes Cigar Co.
CARPENTERS' UNION—Meets every Tues­
day evening at Rowley Hall, 112 Wi. 1st
St. President, Peter T. Marandaw, 522
Garfield Ave. -Vice President, Severt John
sen Recording Secretary, W. M. Pearson,
829 E. Sixth St. Treasurer, Paul* Bolts, 311
E. First St. Financial Secretary, J. C.
Johnston, 21 Palm St.
LATHERS' UNION, No. 12, W. X. L.
F.—Meets on the second and fourth Fri­
day of each month at Kalamazoo Block.
President, James Oatman vice president,.
Hurley Olson secretary/ Albert Meldahl,
607 N. Fifty-ninth avenue W. treasurer,
A. J. Meldahl, 920 West Fifth street.
LICENSED TUGMEN'S PROTECTIYR As­
sociation, Zenith IJodge No. 1.—Meets 1st
and 3rd Tuesday of each month during
the winter season at Marine Engineer's hall
604 Manhattan President, M. Glockle
first vice president. Chas. MoEachen sec­
ond vice president, Andrew Carroll Finan­
cial Secretary Jas. Walsh, 26 Fifth avenue
West recording and corresponding secre­
tary, Albert Jones, 710 E. Sixth St. /treas­
urer, C. H. Green, 1515 £1. Fourth St.
IIARINB KNGINKERf BENEFICIAL AS
soclatlon. No. 78.—Meets every iTrlday
of each motith during the winter months
at Marine Engineers' Hall, 604 Manhattan
Bldg. President, Chas. Hector first vioe
president Guy Webb treasurer, A. Harvey.
P. O. Box 288 corresponding secretary. J.
P.- Burg, 3722 Minnesota avenue.
MACHINISTS' tNlOJi ZENITH tODOl
N« 347 I. A of MV—Me«t» seooad and
fourth Tuesdays of each month ac the, Asa
building. 221 West Superior street. Presi­
dent,
s.
S. McDonald, *3* XL Seventh. St.
vice president. B. W. Nelson. COS (1st Ave.
West. L. Ewald. financial secretary, UN
East Third street recording secretary,. W.
F.' SulUvan, 109 37th AT*. W.
MUSICIANS' UNION No. 18.
Meets first Tuesday of each
their headquarters, 27 West Suj
3
Buy Flags at
theDrapery
Department
on 3rd Floor*
Cotton Flag $1.69
Fast col6r Flags—fine cotton—the large size for the house—a reg­
ular $2.00 leader—special at only $1.69.' ~r"'
SMAMi Fl/AGS FOR
.DECORATING
4 %x73£-incli. ...... 10c Dozen
6 9 1 5
llxl8-Inch.............. 5c Each
Large sizes on sticks at 10c, 15c
and 25c Each!
"REGULATION" BUNTING
FIJAGS
3x 6 feetV .. •... .' %|2.7S' Eacb
5x10 feet «. .$5 00 Each
6x12 feet ....., .. .$8.00 Each
7x14 feet .$10.00 Each
RAILROAD TIME TABLES.
THE DULUTH ft IRON RAXC&
RAILROAD COMPANY.
"The Vermilion Route.'* I
Leave Duluth.
Knife River, Two
Harbors, Tower,
*7:30pro] Ely, Aurora, Bi
•3:15 ml wabik,' McKinley,
1? :45 a mj Sparta, Bveleth and
•Dally except Sunday.
3
1
ol,
1 to 2 p. m. and to 6 p. m. Zenith phons
m-Y.
BLACKSMITH'S UNION, No. 498, nyMti the
.first and third Thursdays of each month
•t the Victor Carlson Hall. 6528 Grand Ave.
West. President, P. G. Phillips Vice Presi­
dent, Louis Haley Recording Secretary, I*
Chapman Treasurer, B. Smith Financial
Secretary, R. W. Cummings, 1204. Winter
St., Superior, Wis..
..|tl0 40|Ar..Mtn.
t-*0 37
•6 46
I
18. A. P. of M.
ich month .at'
their headquarters, 27 West Superior street.
President, L. F. Berger vioe president,
Chas. Helmer financial secretary, I* c.
Coffin treasurer, N. Sudahl sergeant at
arms, E. J. Simpson recording secretary,
W. J* Dutcher, 316) E. First St.
PLUMBERS' AND GASFITTKRS. Local
Union No. 11—Meets on the second and
fourth Thursday of each' month at Kala
mazoo hall. President, Oti. Blackwood
vice president, Marion Haynes reoordlna
secretary-treasurer, H. R. Tlnkham finan­
cial secretary, J. E. KlbblK 1413 Jeffersoa
at./
PAINTERS** DECORATORS AND PAPRR.
HANGERS—MeeU every Tuesdky at
kiUamaUo Block, 13 W. Superior Street
President, W. P. Porry, 13 S. lfth St.
vice pres. W.,H. Brooks, 1513 Minn. Ave.
treasurer, B. rJ. Saltaut financial seerotanr,
D. M. Robinson recording secr^taiVi Jaa
SL Powers. 613 B. Flfjh St.
PLASTERERS' UNION, N0. M, O. P. A.
.meets on second and fourth Wednesday
of each month at, Kalamisoo Bile Presi­
dent, Sam. Maghan vice president./C. Por­
ter financial secretary, ®. Perrott Du­
luth Heights qorrettondlng secretary, c.
Tunauest trustjies, & BlssonetU aad
WUson.
SHEET M«RALVJROBSWMR UNION NA
83, A. 8. M. W., A^-Meeti• tbm first
and third W*^a**4ar of eaah month Kala
masoo Block, at 8^ m. President. Arthur
Moore vice president, Chas. Gause finan­
cial secretary, 'M. 'J. HtnMn §1$ East Sixth
street oorresponding Ind. ntedlng secre
tary, ft Little, 517, lii avtaue East
treasurer, Sly Duoharna.
STEAlOTTTBBS'~UOTtN IN©, 43UL—Meets
second and .' fourth Mondays of «aeh
iponth /kt 33 West SupSrlor St. PresldSnt
Chas...Adams vice president, L. Kochler
Cor.'.T.'.otl6ert Fin. 8ec.-Tr«as.,
it Sanson, tlS B. B&peHrn 8tt Xmmector,
T. Olson.
toooMW(S4i ,raij»K «a I8t nms
ftfit 8dnday. W each month at Kalama
Charles Klene vice
worschak recording secre-
spo. B1
sresideh
BO&-?setoetfM-ttiaainumt,
til 20|Ar.. Blwablk
Arrive
•12:00 Jjfj
6:20pm .J
6:45
Virginia.
DULUTH, MTKSABE NORTHERN.,
I Duluth to Missahe| 3
Range. am
am
*3 50
4 26
4 63
5 18
6 43
14
6 22
6 30
•7 40|Lv.. Duluth .Ar|*10 301 *3 20
8 16|Lv.. Proctor ..Ar| 10 00| 2 50
8 48|Lv. Saginaw .Arj 9 33) 2 25
9 08 Lv.. Alborn ..Ar| 03f 1 58"
9 33|Lv.. Kelsey ..Ar| 35| 1 35v
10 04|Lv,. Forbes ..Ar| 8 06) 1
10 12|Lv..Iron Jotn..Ar| 7 68| 1 00
10 20|Ar... Wolf .Lv| 46| 12 501
Iron..Ar|......
|fl2 20
Ar.. Virginia ..Lvl 66|tl2*35^
($12 10'
Ar.. Eveleth ..Lvl 32Jtl3 43^
ItlO 56
flO 291
(10 24
flO 56|Ar.. Sparta
t« 40
"|tl3 20
a
...|tU o7
•7 06 •10 66|Ar. Hlbblng ,Lv| *7 10
3
I
1
Difluth to Cole
ralne Line.
a'm
•8~'50
5 18
6T 42
6 26
44
64i4
7 04
1 10
7 12
"•7 40
,9 08
9
10 20
10 39
10 49
10 69
11 06|
11 07
Lv.. Duluth .,cA| 10
S
Lv Meadowl'ds Art 8
Lv. 1 Calyx ..Ar| 7
Lv. Pengtily .Ar| 7
Lv.... Marble- Ar| 7
Ar.. Tiaconlte ^Ar| 7
Lv... Bovey ...Arj 7
Ar. Coleralne .Lv[ *7
•Daily... tB*Mpt Sunday. fSqnday only.
Duluth to .Winnipeg and Wwttn
6 "Stations: 8 K'„
7 10 pmjLv.... Duluth ....Arj* 7 30 am?
9 35 pmjLv... Virginia ...An 5 10 ato,
D. B. L. a W. By. J?
10 25 pmlLv'...^ Angora' ....Ar. 4 33 ai%
10 38 pmjLv..... Cook .....Ar| 4 10 anu^i
10 66 pmjLv.... Gheen ....Ar| 3 63 anl^
11 08 pmjLv...... Orr .....^Arj 8 40 am*
11 48 pmjLV.. Klnmount' .'.Arj 8 03 ams -'i
12 17 am|Lv...... Ray ......Arj 3 38 am^
12 86 am|Lv... Brlcsburg .. .Arj 2 16 amt^
13 66 am|Lv.... Rainier ....Ar| 1 t6 ualS
Can. Nor. Ry.
1 10 am|Ar. ..Ft. Frances...Lvl 1 40 am^
8"T0 amILv.. Ft. Frances .Arj li~16"Vm?
10 30 am|Ly..Mine Centre..|Ar. 9 15 pm*~U
12 80 pmjLv... Atlkokan ~.Ar| 6 45 pra^A
23 pm|Lv West Fprt »,.Arj 1,20
6 45 pm|Ar.. Port Arthur ..Larj OO^n^s'
1 25 am|Lv.. Ft. Frances ..Arf* 1 25 ani
3 20 am|Lv.. Rainy Rlyer .Arj 11 is pro.
3 33 amjLv... Beaudette ...Ar| 11 07 pmV
4 33 amjLv... Roosevlt ...Art 10 09 pm
4 58 am|Lvm.. Warroad .M.Arj 9 38 pm
9 18 am|Lv.. St. Bonlflaco 5 15 pmSf
9 35 am|Ar... Winnipeg ...Lv 8 10
It MaUnQ
SUMMER SUITS
To Ordat' For
$18.00.
COnAVDSllTHtBAt
8 Lake AtenvievSoath.
It*t
General
.¥M

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