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The labor world. [volume] (Duluth, Minn.) 1896-current, November 05, 1910, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn78000395/1910-11-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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YOU MAY lAtE YOiER
son
mmi
tk*
WAS
K-
but that doesn't make him the
Father of his Country. Not on
your life.
Neither will a silk label sewed
on. the inside of your coat make
it worth $10.00 to $15.00 more.
When your have yous clothes
made to order from the Glasgow
Woolen Mills, you don't pay one
cent for our name, NO SIR!
Suit or Overcoat
MADE TO ORDER
$15
UNION MADE.
Figure this out and see if it isn't
grood common sense. The woolen
manufacturer gets .a profit on the
goods he sells to the wholesaler.
The wholesaler certainly gets his,
when he sells to the tailor, and the
tailor pays a bigger profit than
the wholesaler because he only
buys single suit patterns. You,
Mr. Consumer, pay the biggest
profit of the whole shootin' match.
Maybe you don't think so, but it's
a fact., Think it over,
Since we secure our woolens' direct
from the mills, thousands of yards at a
clip, for our big chain of stores, we are
therefore able to eliminate the profiis
of the manufacturer, the wholesaler, the
one store tailor and a few other profits.
The rssult is, we are today doing me
largest 'a.HT'uK business in the world
and wh.le our ricfit on each suit is
small, it's volume of business that
counts.
Pants to Order, $2.50 a Leg.
Seats Free.
UNION TAILORS*
333 WEST SUPERIOR ST.
Zenith Phone, 24S8,
J. H. McMULLEN, Manager.
The San Francisco Labor Council
is organizing a union label league for
the purpose of increasing the demand
for the union label.
VOTE
AT THE THEATERS.
It is not surprising that consider­
able curiosity should already have
been aroused by the announcement
that "The Nigger," Edward Sheldon's
race problem play of the South, is
to be seen here for four days com­
mencing Sunday, Nov. 6, with a spe^
cial matinee on election day.
It is probable that here, as else­
where, it will" be one of the most
discussed plays of the year. When
the play was originally produced at
the New Theater, in New York, it
made a sensation, and the New York
Sun declared that it was the New
Theater's "first real success." This
judgment was confirmed when the
play was "tried out" during the
spring tour of the New Theater com
pany, and proved to be the most
profitable play of the repertoire.
It was on the strength of this suc­
cess that Wm. A. Brady determined
to arrange a tour of the United States
and Canada, and give "The Nigger"
a wider hearing than was possible
with the New Theater company. The
results have justified the acumen of
this far-sighted manager.
"The Nigger" has been one of the
few' big dramatic successes of the
year. And this is not surprising to
those who have seen the play and
realize its tremendous dramatic pow­
er. It is a strong play, and at the
same time an intensely human one.
Philip Morrow, a young southerner,
has been elected governor of his state.
In the midst of his triumph, and
-when he Is shortly to wed the girl of
his choice, he learns that he has
negro blood in his veins. This meant
social ostracism. It meant giving up
his ambitions, resigning his office—
relinquishing his-sweetheart—truly a
terrific situation for a refined and
educated man, hitherto proud of be­
ing a white man. The play tells how
Morrow met this situation, and, in
doing so, gives occasion for some of
the most thrillingly-dramatic situa­
tions ever seen upon the stage. Guy
Bates Post, who created the role of
Morrow, will be seen in his original
character, with Miss Florence Rock­
well and an excellent company of
actors.
"The Golden Girl," written by that
invincible trio, Adams, Hough and
Howard, and produced by Mort Sing­
er last season, has taken to the road
and will be seen here within a few
weeks.
"The Chocolate Soldier," in which
FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 50TH
LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT.
An able, honest and efficient self-made man,
who will serve his district faithfully and well.
Men's
and Children's
We have 77 successful stores—
our own factory —a complete
organization taking care of the
Clothing needs of thousands of
satisfied customers. Don't you
think you ought to see for your­
self if we catn be of use to you?
Splendid stocks of Fall Styles
now ready. You'll enjoy seeing
them. Come.
E. C.. Whitney is said to have reached
an enviable mark as a producer of
true comic opera, is booked to appear
here soon.'
Clothing
Men's Suits, $15 up
Men's Overcoats, $10 up
Boys' Suits, $4 up
Ladies'Suits,
r$15
MENTER &AOM
up
Ladies' Coats, $12.50 up
Ladies' Hats, $3 to $12
Rosenb^CO.
122 Easi Superior Strait
Open Saturday Evenings.
1
"b
t*rit
!i&
NON-PARTISANS CONDEMN EBERHART
Distinguished Republicans and Donocrats Teil Story of His Enslavement by the
interests.—Ed. Smith Would Wild His Hold on People of tit State.
Four distinguished citizens of Minneapolis have performed a
public duty. They have issued a statement over their own signatures
running through the record of Senator E. E. Smith, who is chair­
man of the Republican state central committee and campaign man­
ager for Gov. Eberhart. These men are former Gov. John Lind.,
Democrat D. C. Bell, a prominent investment banker and philan­
thropist, Republican S. A. Stockwell, former state senator and'
civic leader, Democrat and A W. Rankin, head of the college of
pedagogy at the state university and widely known educator, Re
publican. These men are actuated solely by a sense of public service.
.! None is a candidate for office and one (Gov. Lind) only recently
declined a nomination which meant an election as governor. All these
are men identified with the state, its people and its future welfare.
They tell the story of the shame of Minnesota. They disclose
the existence of a pool or combination which has for at least four
years absolutely dominated and controlled the enactment of every
piece of legislation. They show beyond any doubt the existence of
this combination. They recite the record of Senator Smith, its
recognized head and guiding spirit, and trace his steps fronr the
management of this sinister organization to the enlarged field wherein
by the election of Gov. Eberhart he will fasten his hold upon the
entire people of the state. The story is told calmly, dispassionately
and with truth so convincing that no argument can successfully
assail it. The election of the present governor, surrounded as he
is by these influences which made him their willing servitor as
lieutenant governor, will bind the people of the state to predatory
interests for years to come.
The men who issue this statement do not suggest a remedy.
They but point out the danger that confronts Minnesota. The Dem­
ocratic state central committee believes in these men. It has faith
that they would not make these charges if they were not true. It
offers as its candidate for governor James Gray, a
whom nothing has been said in this campaign and nothing can be
said. Gray has taken the people of the state into his confidence. He
has told, them where he stands on every issue. Gov. Eberhart has
evaded every issue. If he has any views on any public question he
has not given them. The Democratic party offers Mr. Gray as a
candidate believing that with him as governor there will be no legis­
lative pool there will be no special service for special interests and
that popular government will be restored,
The statement signed by Gov. Lind, Mr. Bell, Senator Stockwell
and Professor Rankin is appended:
THE STATEMENT,
"For several sessions the Minnesota legislature has been dom­
inated by an organized band of most unprogressive politicians.
Through the manipulations of these men such special interests as the
Minnesota Liquor Dealers' Association, the railroad ring, a number
of public utility companies and other predatory corporations have eon
trolled legislation and prevented reforms, both •moral and economic,
"Believing that the great mass of the people were in ignorance
of these conditions, Lynn Haines, Secretary of the Minnesota Citi­
zens' League, published a book, 'The Minnesota Legislature of 1909/
which exposed the personnel and purpose of the politicians who had
so grossly misrepresented their constituents.
"This volume, together with other reform influences, so aroused
the people that at the primary elections they defeated, with few ex­
ceptions, the members of the old stand-pat machine who were can­
didates for re-election.
"Some whose pernicious political acts and affiliations had been
exposed did not dare to ask the voters for another term. Among the
professional politicians who thus retired voluntarily or were defeated
at the primaries are included practically every member who had been
a leader or lieutenant of the stand-pat nmchihe/ 'Shese eliminations
mean that thfe Aldrich-Cannon kind of machine has-been almost com­
pletely demolished in the Minnesota legislature
"But here is the rub. Hie recognized leader of all these special
interest-professional political forces in the legislature was Senator E.
E. Smith of Minneapolis. He and his organization have been driven
out of the legislature, but they ate now attempting to fortify and
perpetuate their reign higher up—in the governorship. Senator Smith,
the discredited legislative representative of the breweries and public
service companies, is in absolute control of the Eberhart campaign,
and, if it is successful, will undoubtedly be the guiding force of the
Eberhart administration.
SENATOR SMITH'S RECORD.
"In the chapter in which members of both House and Senate are
characterized, Mr. Haines says of Senator Smith: 'The recognized
leader of the corporation forces in the legislature needs no detailed
mention here because preceding chapters have shown his powers and
pernicious public character voted for the Hinton bill.'
"No informed person will dispute that Senator Smith commanded
and controlled the special interest machine in the legislature. His
vote on a few questions furnishes corroborative evidence that he was
an unprogressive politician who stood consistently for predatory
corporations:
"REFORMING THE RULES—Smith voted against the at­
tempt to change the Cannonized methods of legislation, the change
being designed to prevent the smothering and distorting of bills in
committees.
"ELECTION MEASURES—Smith voted to repeal the primary
election law and to repeal the corrupt practices act he voted against
extending the primary and against the direct election of United
States Senators.
"LIQUOR LEGISLATION—Smith voted with the organized
brewery influence on every proposition. He supposed the Alderman
bill which operates to give big breweries a firmer hold on communi­
ties, both commercially and politically.
"THE HINTON BILL—Smith voted for this infamous measure
which was framed in the direct interest of the breweries and railroad
ring as to make it a misdemeanor for any individual or reform organ­
ization to secure pre-election pledges from candidates.
"RAILROAD REFORMS—Smith voted against the people and
for the railroads as often as he had opportunity. He voted against
bills to regulate and prevent discriminations in freight rates he voted
against the 16-hour resolution he voted for aniendments to the two
cent fare bill which made it more favorable for the railroads he voted
against 'the full crew bill he voted against railroad employees also
on the bill providing for automatic couplers he voted against the
reciprocal demurrage bill.
"AGAINST ROOSEVELT—Smith voted in the negative on a
resolution endorsing President Roosevelt against the slurs and accu­
sations of Harriman and urging congress to support the president and
pass laws giving the government more control over the transportation
trusts.
"We believe that the voters of the state should understand about
the legislative life and influence of the politician whom Governor
Eberhart insisted should manage his campaign.
"Governor Eberhart is notoriously weak and pliauit in the hands
of such brewery representatives as Senator Smith. As lieutenant
Governor, Mr. Eberhart not only did nothing to oppose the operations
of the Smith machine, but be gave direct assistance to their schemes
by placing Smith and other reactionaries in charge of the important
committees.
"The signers of this are a self-cbnstituted committee whose in­
terest in the campaign is that of nonpartisan citizens who desire
that politicians like Smith shall be driven ©lit of control of the gov­
ernorship as they have been dxiven out of the legislature.
^S. A. STOCKWELW
"JOHN LIND,
"DAVID C. BEL& "A. W. RANKIN.
The International Typographical
union's feepefits last year amounted
to *30$,000. ,,
.3^
ci»?s»3S»A
.. ..
man
Qhicago, Hi., Typographical union
has voted 110ft for the striking coal
Quality
Store
against
Don't Take Your Choice
Between Good Looks and Good Service. Wear
FITWELL CLOTHES" and Get Both. Every
Suit and Overcoat
from this store carries with it the absolute
assurance that there is nothing better made
at an equal price of—
$15—$20—$25
AMERICA'S GREATEST
CLOTHING SPECIALISTS.
AH FITWELL CLOTHES Bear the Union Label.
3 WINNER
Overcoats
$15
We show 59 different styies of Over­
coats at the above Popular Price. Every:
new style and make is here for jou to
select from. Three-quarters Length,
with or without velvet collars, 52 and
54 inch lengths, with convertible or
Presto collars which can be worn either
plain or as a miltiary. Blacks, Greys,
Browns and Fancy Mixtures, and every
garment is pure wool and guaranteed
to hold the shape. The High Rent
•tores' prices for coats like these are
from $20 to $26, and we will prove this
to you if you will favor us with a, call.
O
30 DAYS FREE TRIAL
of Any Range or Heater
The Famous Detroit Jewel
or Monitor Radiator Heat'
ers Set Up in Your Home
For Free Trial.
*20
1 5
CLOTHING COMPANY (INC.)
115 K. Superior St. Opposite City Hall
People Who Know Have Their
SHOE
REPAIRING
DONE BY
NEALLY
THE SHOE SURGEON
Wo have the moat modern ma
ehlaefjr and employ skilled work­
men* Compare our work. Wear
DETACHABLE
KUBBER HEEl^
(Heimbach patent) for great com*
0*t and prevent yowf heels ftrom
running' over,' Double w*ar
same pride Thousands of people
in Dttluth wear them.
ERICE 50 CXSNTS.
.*» A".
Quality
Store
a
You can try it before you
buy it. You can't make a mis­
take—you take no chance. This
is the most liberal offer any
dealer ever made—we could not af­
ford to make it unless we knew
positively that no better heaters
were made.
The Monitor Radiator is a won­
der— it is the greatest heater made
—and it takes the least amount of
fuel—there is no other heater built
like it.
You know the famous Detroit
Jewel- heaters and ranges—-the fin­
est made goods in the worlds—give
a third more heat with a third less
fuel.
Ail Sold On
Easy Payments
FOR SALE
$500—Cash—-Sevan-room house 1191
Bast Fourth St. Balance of
93,500 in monthly payments.
A bargain. Will not need any
repairs.
$8500—New six-room house 1801
Bast Sixth St. Hot water
heating plant. $1000 oadh
—balance easy terms.
$3200—Two flats, five rooms eaoh.
2632 West Fifth St. $B00
cash, balance $30 a month.
$8900—New six-room house 4115 W.
Third St Water, gas, elec­
tric light, bath, hardwood
tJoorp. $1000 cash, balance
easy payments.
PVLF0RD, HOW ft COMPANY
800 jErchange Bonding.
B. ANGEMEIER.
v.
Discorerer of BobaqoeaiReadies
This hot weather puts one out of
commission and consequently the
bowels and system don't Just work
right. Why not let HERBAQUEBN
keep them in repair? They surely 4o
the work. If you are ailing with any
kind of disease come to
SI BAST SUPERIOR ST Upstalm.
•i Population and Advice Fra»,
SmoKe CLUB ROOM
iDfetoa Label Fin Cntt C1GASS.
DULOTH CANDY CO.
Dlstrllmtum.
Mwta
nwrehsaais* sfjwrty
an*
yi*m-
3KXSS
meats, ptS*0f- W*
ingvald Batata's
Hwf?.
AREYsmm?
If not, you arc not en
joying perfect health.
FOR THE
BUSY BUSINESS MAN.
THE TIRED EABOREK,
THE MOTHER WITH HER
MANY HOUSE BOJLD
CARES AND .DUTIES—
There is nothing so good,
pure yd nourishing as a
alius of
FITGER'S BEER
meals and at bed-
Before
tlm
Recommended by Promi­
nent Physiciana—
Used by nurses and hospi­
tals—
Bold at all food .places.
Fitgar Brewiag Co.
DULUTH.
C.C. STAACKE
OPTICIAN
106 West Superior Street
Saturday
Open Wednesday ana
evenings..
NEW
BIJOU
THEATER.
Raw «f ••Howl VwdnMt.
ILLUSTRATED
S0NQS.
I0YIR0
PICTURES.
3 SHOWS DAILY 3
(TBMIITTHBMAMM
am
Sealth
Telephone, 189S.
RU E. S E N
Jeweler and WathmaKer
988 WBST FIRST. STMSIST.
IMfla BldCs Dulnth, Mas
UNION MADE BEER
Bears This Label on
the Keg,
Zwitt Ci
talUns
'1
.'•'•X
~1
-Da
Vrt
OF AMERICA
Tf^DF'.WK REGISTERED
'(fain?
fti/Vua*
jnuftlvfgtf-t
PRINTING
BAmmr
oo.
PEnrrrao
SUCCESSORS TO
A. J. LYLE PRESS.
821-223 West Superior 8ft.
AXA BUILDING.
Label Fmiihtl as a*
Waik..
I
FHOHBi IQinH, 17AA
—SMOKE— S?
PURAD0RA and
6EQ.
TAYLOR
..Key Wast
gar Conpany
SHARTEL A,
He. Sa.
ETTINGER Pro*
Fll?t At^

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